November 12, 2018

4K Mirrorless Video Quality Comparison (EOS R, BMPCC 4K, Z7, A7III, X-T3)

Mirrorless Camera Comparisons
Comparative reviews of the major 4K Mirrorless cameras on the market.

As we’ve been continuously covering here on No Film School, the mirrorless camera revolution is in full swing with nearly every major camera manufacturer now in the game with some very sexy, and pretty similar offerings. The Canon EOS R, Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K, Nikon Z7, Sony A7 III, and the Fujifilm X-T3 are all considerations for filmmakers and video professionals looking to make an upgrade or new investment for 4K mirrorless video.

Let’s look at one in-depth comparative video to see which cameras shine and which cameras fall short in a variety of areas. 

4K Mirrorless Video Comparison

While there have been other camera tests done as well, this review done by Youtuber Max Yuryev is focused on comparing these five cameras to find which stands out for video and for films. Yuryev makes it clear that while he tried to use uniformality between lenses, because of the different mount systems he had to use several different (but similar) lenses to complete his test. (Note: this video review is of each camera's video quality, you can also find reviews comparing the following cameras' low light capabilities here and autofocus here.)

4K Video Quality Rankings

Mirrorless Cameras

Before Yuryev goes into comparing 1080p and 120fps recording between the five cameras, he does give some an interesting side-by-side split screen breakdown of the cameras in terms of 4K video detail. Based on the results in his study, Yuryev places the following ranks on the five cameras’ 4K video quality.

  1. Sony A7 III: $1,998.00
  2. Fujifilm X-T3: $1,499.00
  3. Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K: $1,295.00
  4. Nikon Z7: $3,396.95
  5. Canon EOS R: $2,299.00

What are your thoughts on this test and the results? Have any comparisons of your own to share? Let us know in the comments!     

Your Comment

12 Comments

Haven't watched the video yet, but just looking at the power lines in the split screen photo, the EOS-R seems to have the least amount of aliasing going on. This is more than likely because the image is soft. And when you look at the sign on the building, it is indeed soft compared to the A7. That being said, the aliasing on the A7 looks pretty darn bad in my opinion.

November 12, 2018 at 7:55PM, Edited November 12, 8:03PM

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Derek Doublin
Director, Cinematographer, Large Scale Artist
642

have you seen the power line in front of the blue sign on bmpcc4k ? is it moire ? no other camera in the test has this artefact.

November 14, 2018 at 5:02AM

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Max's review is flawed. He measured out-of-the-box resolution at 100% magnification and called it video quality. He knocked the Z7 because of its extreme sharpening and the EOS R because of its softness. In the case of the Z7, he might have considered turning down the sharpness in the Profile settings.
For video, resolution of fine detail is only a minor factor in image quality. More important is the overall subjective impression in the perception of the viewer.
It would have been better to present each camera filming a variety of subjects, including faces, moving subjects, and under low light.

November 13, 2018 at 5:08AM

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Curtis Polk
Principal
74

what do you mean by "out of the box" ? max also tested for skin tone and low light in another video.

November 14, 2018 at 5:00AM

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Are you serious? You excluded the GH5!

November 13, 2018 at 5:57AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
1139

Same sensor as BMPC4K just without the sharpening. Lots of comparisons between the GH5 and BMPC4K. I'm torn as a GH5 user myself. I wanted to perhaps upgrade to the GH5s for better lowlight and also no floating sensor that can get jossled. BMPC4k does this for half the cost but then I'm stuck with ProRes on a PC or raw when I've come used to DNxHR with atomos. As a single op I don't know that I want to spend money on a cam without great video autofocus.

November 13, 2018 at 8:33PM

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Keep your setup for all the reasons you just mentioned.

November 14, 2018 at 5:09AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
1139

First the GH5s and the Blackmagic don't have the same sensor. Do your homework. That was a rumor. The two sensors have different sizes.
Second, the test is totally futile. Any of this camera is more than enough to do the job if:
1-You have a very interesting story
2-First rate actors
3-High production value non related to camera.

What's going to make a difference is not whether you use the Blackmagic or the Fuji, but whether or not your story, concept is interesting and well executed, that's where the challenge is. Not in the camera.
I'll watch anything filmed and produced by the Coen Brothers if they film it in VHS.

November 14, 2018 at 1:16PM, Edited November 14, 1:18PM

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Correctomundo!

November 15, 2018 at 6:30AM

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Jerry Roe
Indie filmmaker
1139

The test wasn't for:

1-A very interesting story
2-First rate actors
3-High production value non related to camera.

Just because the test criteria was irreverent from your own doen't invalidate this particular test.

November 17, 2018 at 11:12AM

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Yeah, I have pixel peeped at Nikon Z6 footage and have seen none of these aliasing issues in those videos. Is Z7 really worse? Somehow I doubt it. From what I understand, there is a sharpening post process on the Nikon by default that can be easily disabled. I'd be interested in a comparison once that has been turned off.

November 16, 2018 at 3:41PM, Edited November 16, 3:41PM

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Christopher Kou
Production Manager
216

Are they tested with the same lens? Yes as mentioned the OLPF does affect the test result as well.

November 16, 2018 at 9:14PM

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