February 12, 2019
Awards

Oscar Telecast Will Not Feature Best Cinematography, Best Editing, and More Awards

And the Oscar goes to...we may not find out.

While there have been several complaints over the years about how the Academy Awards telecast is just too darn long (on average clocking in at about three-hours-and-40 minutes), the Academy has rarely done anything to shorten its length. Now without a host (for the first time in decades — thanks Kevin Hart), the Academy is committed to keeping this year's telecast to three hours tops. 

One additional way they've decided to do this is by eliminating several competitive award categories from the telecast, instead choosing to air them during commercial breaks. The four awards that will be handed out "off-air" will be Best Cinematography, Best Editing, Best Live Action Short, and Best Makeup & Hairstyling. Academy President John Bailey, himself a cinematographer, has experienced some backlash for this decision, with critics noting that it downplays the importance of the entire moviemaking process by choosing not to air those categories live on the telecast.

All hope is not lost, however. Bailey reassured Academy Award viewers that "with the help of our partners at ABC, we will stream these four award presentations online for our global fans to enjoy, live, along with our audience. Fans will be able to watch on Oscar.com and on the Academy’s social channels. The live stream is a first for our show, and will help further awareness and promotion of these award categories."

For an example of what we'll be missing on ABC when the ceremony airs, take a look at last year's moving speech by first-time winner Roger Deakins.

Will you be watching the Oscars this year? What do you think of the Academy's decision to not air certain categories? Let us know in the comments below.      

Your Comment

8 Comments

Well gee - thanks for the news! The news we all found out immediately from our main news sources and social media. NFS, you’re missing the point here. Do you have an opinion?? Does NFS actually have something interesting to say or offer about this that hasn’t been said already? We don’t need another click bait headline without any content, that’s a pretty hollow way to maintain a passionate and dedicated community. Where are the voices from the creators in this article? The directors and DPs who are speaking up right now about how weird and wrong this is? Speak up! Not everyone has as big an audience as you and it might help if you could just grow a pair, and be honest about something for once. Defend yourself. Have an opinion. Take a stand. You’ve been missing the mark on a lot of things, and it makes me feel like you’re out of touch with you’re own community.

February 12, 2019 at 10:35AM

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Devin Pickering
Cinematographer/Editor/Composer
246

I feel like the content has been on a downward trend for a few years now.
I joined maybe 4/5 years ago and then it was fantastic and there was a genuine discussion. Now it's just regurgitated news a lot of the time.

February 12, 2019 at 12:16PM

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The facebook link had this as it's title: 'How should we feel about this?'

The site has nothing to say and wants its audience to tell it how to feel (not think I might add).

February 12, 2019 at 2:48PM

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Absolutely the dumbest thing the Academy has done in recent years!
Cut the full performances of nominated songs!

February 12, 2019 at 10:43AM

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Does this really matter though?

I have never understood, and don't think I will ever understand why ceremonies like this matter.

It's just a forum for fellating other people in the industry. The 'awards' are purposeless and ridiculous. Why aren't people happy with film festivals and recognition from A) the film itself B) the fact they've made a piece of cinema?

Who cares if they're not presenting a certain award at a certain time?

Move on, it doesn't matter.

February 12, 2019 at 12:15PM

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It matters because awards like these are supposed to be the way that we recognize talent, and great storytelling. There are other places in the world where society cultivates art, it’s meaning, merit and relevance. America does not. Our government does not see value in the arts. So it’s left to film festivals and the academy to lift filmmakers up to higher standards to show how meaningful storytelling in cinema is. It’s important. It matters. Unfortunately the academy has allowed political correctiveness and TV ratings to become more important than the meaning of the work, of the stories that have been sweat and bled over in order to be told and made by their creators. Cinematography and editing are THE CORE of cinema, of this/our art form and means of human expression. It’s outrageous that they cannot see the value in televising the awards in full, it’s outrageous that they believe song and dance numbers are more important than letting a director have enough time to give his acceptance speech. It’s the entire reason we’re watching. To understand why they made the film, why millions of dollars and hundreds of people worked their asses off to tell a story. It’s outright dispicable that this is what the academy has become. The rest of the film world is laughing at us.

February 12, 2019 at 1:17PM

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Devin Pickering
Cinematographer/Editor/Composer
246

I still fail to see its relevance at all. We have film festivals for this, which celebrate a far broader spectrum of films and offer praise and recognition to not just a few stories that have been told.
It's a contrived mess which celebrates such a niche and minute part of the industry it becomes a mockery of itself almost.

February 13, 2019 at 5:00AM

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Nevermind, the show will be absolutely boring anyway.

February 13, 2019 at 2:54PM

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George Lima de Queiroz
Editor / researcher / director
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