May 20, 2013

One Week Only: Get an Exclusive No Film School Discount on the Innovative Supraflux Camera Stabilizer

The Kickstarter for the Supraflux Video Camera Stabilizer ended recently, raising almost $100,000, well over the initial $27,000 goal. If you didn't happen to get in on the action, however, you're in luck, because the Supraflux team is giving No Film School readers a special discount for a limited time. What is Supraflux exactly? Created by the guys behind the Picosteady, it's a handheld camera with an ingenious way to control rotation. Check out a video introducing the device below.

Chase Jarvis interviewed the team, here is a little from that:

CJ: What makes the SupraFlux so innovative?

Nadim: The first stabilizer was invented in the 70′s and hasn’t seen any innovation since then. In more than 30 years it has always remained the same concept, and has always been operated with the same technique: using your fingers directly on the post to control the camera’s movement. The problem with that is that it requires a lot of experience to get a good results. What makes the Supraflux Stabilizer so innovative is that you no longer need to touch the post to control the direction. This removes the human-factor error, and it tremendously reduce the experience and skills required to get good footage from the Stabilizer.

Some demo footage:

This is the capacity for the stabilizer:

What cameras work with the stabilizer?

Virtually all cameras ranging from 0.25 lbs to 10 lbs (115 g to 4.5 kg) will work with the Supraflux stabilizer. The camera is mounted using the included standard 1/4-20 size bolt. For cameras not equipped with a 1/4-20 mount (such as smartphones), you will need an adapter (not included). These are inexpensive and readily available online.

I think the brake is a really interesting idea (obviously so did many others as they gave almost $100k). While any camera stabilizer takes time and patience to get right, you're not going to find anything like this on a relatively inexpensive piece of kit.

For a period of 7 days (beginning now), the team at Supraflux is offering folks the same deal as the 2nd Early Bird Kickstarter pledge. That pledge rate, at $530, is a tremendous savings over the current normal price of $745 (including shipping to the US and Canada for both). Head on over to the special discount site to get your very own stabilizer for over $200 off.

Link: Supraflux Video Camera Stabilizer No Film School Discount

Your Comment

26 Comments

Looks like a glidecam..., and It doesn't mention anything about a quick release plate at all.

May 20, 2013 at 6:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Laurence

You can probably attach one.

May 20, 2013 at 7:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Gareth

Question.
Why looking back at the pico page - these guys stabilized the footage (it appears) - And when I tried to look up a preview/review on google - it looks like the results are spammed - (or google is broke)...

Anyway my point is - has anyone outside of them tried a prototype?

http://nofilmschool.com/2012/08/last-chance-to-get-a-picosteady-iphone-d...

May 20, 2013 at 7:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jer

Paid 130$ flycam from india. Got better results than many pros after 6 month of pratice. So why pay more?

May 20, 2013 at 7:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Carlos

You think you did, but you didn't

May 20, 2013 at 7:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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ryan

That's a bold statement. Could you please share some links to your work?

May 20, 2013 at 8:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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The sample shots don't look particularly steady. Would order one immediately if they were.

May 20, 2013 at 7:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Gareth

Exactly, the samples look terrible. They also cut after every corner. I assume the thing can't be controlled any better than the crap they are copying the design.

May 23, 2013 at 12:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I thought the same. Lots of jitters. I think the idea is there, but may have been a bit rushed... Instead of focusing on a new stabilizer, I think they should have worked with existing ones (Glidecam, Steadicam, etc..) and developed an attachable brake for their handles. That would have been gold.

May 20, 2013 at 7:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jordan

Yeah - sorry to sound like I'm crapping on this product (which is pretty cool and clever to be fair) but the footage in the first demo really doesn't do them any favors. It really isn't a good sign when the demo footage for a stabilizer isn't actual stable. Sorry :p Also - might just be me but it almost looks stabilized in post on some shots (apologies to the guys if this isn't true).

May 20, 2013 at 7:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Kraig

game changer.

May 20, 2013 at 9:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ben Howling

I rarely say this, because I believe in the idea of "you get what you pay for" when it comes to most (not all) camera gear... but this thing just can't compete with so much that is already out there for less money, built at I'm sure the exact same quality.

The premium isn't worth it just to get the little brake thing. It just isn't worth it. To call this "innovative" is a longshot.

May 21, 2013 at 8:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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David S.

In no way shape or form is this a game changer

May 24, 2013 at 12:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Bill

The sample shots have some vertical jerk..either a part of the used brake had some loose screws or the quick release is loose. Flycam products are awesome though for much less money. The Flycam C5 (330$), with a movable gymbal acts just like a 3,000$ steadicam pilot ( I use both). Here is one of the videos I did. http://vimeo.com/65298588

May 21, 2013 at 12:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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quobetah

Good work!

May 22, 2013 at 1:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Nick

Not looking good. At least they are honest that it isnt good at stabilizing footage. Glad they shared footage. Looks like fun as long as it isnt used for filming.

May 21, 2013 at 12:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Mark Weston

Yeah these shots displayed do not actually look that great. Very Jittery and Drifty.
And this is not "innovative" I mean their design is very similar to the pre-existing rigs that have been built in the past. Throw a "brake" on it and you have something new... Looks cheap to me.

May 21, 2013 at 11:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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kyle

Not to be rude, but that sample video does not make me want to buy one. When I buy a stabilizer, I expect to be able to get stable footage from it - and if the creators themselves can't do it, it doesn't instill me with confidence. I wish them all the best, but they won't be getting my money. Now if they were to create brakes for other systems besides their own, as others have already suggested, that would pique my interest.

May 21, 2013 at 6:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brian

Pretty cool idea. I think that making the brake adaptable to other stabilizers would be better than selling a whole stabilizer.

May 21, 2013 at 9:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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maghox

There is a steady cam + dual arm + west by a Chinese brand called CAME (I know...) Emm recommends it on cheesycam.com, I think it runs for about 100$ less then the future list price of this one; break vs. dual & vest (and cheaper!), I''d go for the CAME!

May 22, 2013 at 7:41AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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SOLD! It took me all of 15 minutes to be convinced this stabilizer is better than the others on the market (at the price). I want to thank the Supraflux guys and Ryan at NFS for making this deal available. I've been using the Steadicam Smoothee stabilizer (from Steadicam) with my GoPro--its great, but yes, it does require a lot of practice, because even the light touch to pan the camera while moving tends to send it off axis. This is also a function of camera mass--the lighter the camera, the more easily destabilized it becomes. The Supraflux will work with the Bolex D16 I intend buying later this year as it weighs 5lbs, not including a lens, etc. So it will JUST be sufficient. But tiring on the wrist, I know that.

May 23, 2013 at 3:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I also want to add a PS to my comment above, and to those who aren't convinced by the demo footage. There is a huge huge difference between a handheld stabilizer and one mounted to a vest. The angular momentum applied to one's wrist makes any shot longer than, say, a minute or two, very difficult to hold. There is also the weight of the camera to consider in terms of mass, heavier being less likely to get jostled off-axis. The light finger touch on any stabilizer to pan the camera does apply some angular movement, unless you've practised enough to avoid that; this invention alleviates that rolling or tilting while allowing for the third axis movement you want--to pan with the subject. I'm willing to give it a try. And the price is better than, say, the Merlin 2 (currently on sale for $600).

May 23, 2013 at 3:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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all the shots are super wjde which reduces jitter, so no a good indication of normal lens use

May 23, 2013 at 6:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Danyyel

Wide angle doesn't (and didn't) reduce jitters , it makes them less pronounced than tele, but a bump's a bump unless worked on it in post. If you're working without a vest, you won't get a professional move any more complex than one that would be better accomplished with a slider or a jib. That said, these shots kinda suck

May 24, 2013 at 1:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Bill

I suppose these guys are so utterly inarticulate about their own brainchild that they couldn't dare be interviewed on camera discussing the device and demoing it while talking. I had to kill the lame musical entertainment. Obviously not marketing masterminds if they think that stuff will do anything to sell their device. Going by the comments here, the device itself seems weak compared to the Madison-Avenue-like ad spot.

May 24, 2013 at 10:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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wsmith

wow so much trash talk! Have any of you actually owned one or used one yet? Maybe this was a prototype, or maybe they just aren't that good at using the product, maybe we should all reserve our judgement until it's actually released.

Mark

May 29, 2013 at 8:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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mark