October 16, 2013

Endcrawl Creates Your End Titles, with Unlimited Renders, for One Flat Fee

Even if all of the hard stuff, like writing, planning, shooting, and editing your film has been finished, there's still the matter of creating the scrolling end credits. Taking on the task of entering, editing, and proofing every word, as well as taking care of strobe and jitter issues and info wrangling, may not be something you have the time or energy for at the end of the filmmaking process. If paying for a service to do it for you seems like an attractive option, Endcrawl, which is currently in private beta testing, will create your end credits, as well as any revisions you might need, for a one-time fee.

According to an article from RedShark News, the web-based service, Endcrawl, operates on a 24/7 cloud render engine, and provides clients with 2K renders of their end credits at $499 per project with unlimited revisions at no extra cost. So, if you forgot to thank someone, misspelled your lead actor's name, or failed to include a logo, you can have Endcrawl edit it for you without having to pull out your wallet. Not only that, but there's no expiration date on your project, so if you need to add a name somewhere down the road, maybe another investor came on board, then you can do that (at no cost.)

One major advantage to not having to create your own credits is not having to find needed logos and writing all of those legal provisions (or finding them.) Endcrawl gives clients a logo repository, legal boilerplate, and multiple versions of your credits for each aspect ratio, from 2K DCP to 4:3 pan & scan.

According to Endcrawl's website, they can deliver 1K checkers in minutes to your inbox, and 2K DPX in about an hour. So -- fast. RedShark talks about a demonstration by Endcrawl co-creator John Eremic:

From his mobile phone, [he] was able to make changes to a set of titles, and request a new render of a  title sequence (in this example he called up the complete credits for The Wizard Of OZ). Around ten minutes later his e-mail pinged. After a quick download, he flipped his phone around to display a beautiful set of smooth scrolling end credits.

So, if interested, you can sign up for the beta, and try it out. After sign up, you fill out their "spruced up" Google Doc spreadsheet (which will be changed once the service moves out of beta.) Specify the resolution and format you want for your titles, and let Endcrawl get to work. For beta customers, 1K renders are free, and if, and only if, you like the way the 1K came out, you pay the $499 for the 2Ks. They'll send your files right to your email.

For more on how the Endcrawl beta works, go here.

What do you think about Endcrawl's services? Do you think this is a good solution for indie filmmakers needing scrolling end credits?

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19 Comments

Interesting for sure, but I don't see many low-budget filmmakers utilizing this.. 500 bucks for titles? No thanks. Definitely chock full of nice features though, but not my cup of tea.

October 16, 2013 at 11:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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agreed.

October 17, 2013 at 12:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Al

If you can afford to pay $500 for credits where the information is as accurate as you give it, then you should be fine paying someone who actually needs the work and money or even - get this - doing it yourself.

October 17, 2013 at 1:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Tyler

Hi, Pliny here, one of the Endcrawl co-founders. Our $499 price point is for feature films. Once we're out of beta we'll absolutely have different pricing tiers for different types of projects.

We've had many films in the $150k range use us, including a number of Kickstarter projects. The service simply gives you a few days of your life back. (And nice-looking end credits, too.) If you've ever had to build a 5-minute scroll, and then make 100 "one last thing" re-renders, you know what I'm talking about.

Anyone with a feature film in post is welcome to a free demo, which includes 1K renders, gratis, no obligation. (Those are great for review, but they're also handy for festival submission screeners).

October 17, 2013 at 7:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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QUOTE: If you’ve ever had to build a 5-minute scroll, and then make 100 “one last thing” re-renders, you know what I’m talking about.

Totally Agree! $500 is well worth getting my week back.

October 17, 2013 at 10:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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sean

??? I don't understand how anyone is spending that much time on the end crawl. That makes no sense.

October 18, 2013 at 11:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Darren Orange

It makes no sense TO YOU, but it makes plenty of sense to people like indie directors or editors who have bigger things to worry about then spending a bunch of hours writing, designing, proofreading, animating and rendering crap like this.

How long was the longest end crawl you've ever built?

October 18, 2013 at 5:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dan

This is suuuccch a good idea.

Directors/writers/producers... and basically anyone who's not in editorial, TAKE NOTE OF THIS.

Anyone doing professional work knows title scrolls are very time consuming. And if these folks are building QC into their offer, that alone is worth the price of admission. Especially in the big-boy world where miscrediting can lead to problems.

For editors like myself, this is a part of the process that isn't our responsibility, but we'll often get hit with it. We're there to pace the film and present it in the best way possible. We're not there to worry about the kerning of names. This is traditionally an online thing.

And 500 bucks is a steal. That's like one day at an assistant editor's rate. And lemme tell ya, that stuff comes back over, and over, and over...

October 28, 2013 at 7:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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August

I don't understand this service. This is built into pretty much every editor(premiere at least) I don't see how having a 3rd party saves you anytime at all. Even more so if you are maxing a DCP.

October 17, 2013 at 3:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Darren Orange

Paid advertiser, no disclosure maybe?

October 18, 2013 at 9:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Haha, yea well sure seems like it.

October 18, 2013 at 11:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Darren Orange

Have you ever had to make your own end credits? It is SO much more time consuming than it first appears, and there's so much more to it that putting text on screen and making it scroll.

October 19, 2013 at 10:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brian

A lot of the built in web crawls are incredibly flawed and can't output professional looking work. Then you start trying various tricks to make them look usable, resort to plugins, and fumble around with After Effects stand alone. That's a common experience, and a lot of wasted time.

October 22, 2013 at 4:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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b.

I see where this company is coming from in the sense of not having to deal with making your end credits but the cost right now makes this whole process unappealing unless your filming a feature film. Even then I still would rather hand it off to my editor to take care of. There should have been a package available for low budget projects off the bat in beta. Otherwise the idea is there just tweak.

October 17, 2013 at 6:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Well if you're paying your editor $100+ an hour (as you should be), then this service is not so expensive after all.

October 19, 2013 at 10:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brian

Because it pointless when my editor gets paid to "most" of the time take care of things like these. If I had the same mentality what's another 499 I would be broke. Thats illogical I could spend that money getting my cut perfect not my credits. And if he's getting 100 dollars an hour "as he should be" then my credits should look great.

October 23, 2013 at 1:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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... you're telling me there isn't any kind of application or plugin to manage crawl titles in CC or FCP?

This is a good price,

October 17, 2013 at 7:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Scott

... as I was saying before my keyboard so rudely interrupted me. This is a good price if you're doing a lot of these, but for the one-offs, it makes less sense for smaller organizations.

October 17, 2013 at 7:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Scott

In my case, I'm having to make a credit roll for an independent feature. I've done basic ones on documentaries using the title tool on FCP7. What I cannot do there is alter the sizes of fonts within the scroll, create two columns of song credits after the single column of crew credits, and add the SAG, ARRI, MPAA (etc.) logos. My producers don't want to use individual cards, and I don't know enough about After Effects or Motion to try and create this myself, so already the $499 is a better deal than paying for the learning curve of my one-man band. I'm passing their info on to my producers. (Thanks, "Short Term 12," for including Endcrawl within the end titles.)

January 19, 2014 at 9:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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