November 11, 2013

Experimental Filmmaking for Dummies (Part 1): Why You Should Be Making Experimental Films

Here at NFS, we've covered experimental films from time to time, sharing details on how they're made and things of that nature. Last month we even shared a delightful, albeit brief, history of experimental cinema that touched on a few of the core concepts and definitive filmmakers of the genre. Despite these brief forays into the avant-garde, however, we've never actually talked about making experimental films. Until now, that is. In our new series, "Experimental Filmmaking for Dummies", we'll explore not only the multitude of reasons why every filmmaker can benefit from experimental filmmaking, but also how to get started with making shorts in all of the most popular experimental sub-genres. Stick with us on this one. It'll be a fun ride.

What Is Experimental Filmmaking?

Experimental film is difficult to define, not because its guidelines are so abstract or even esoteric, but because it's such a wide-ranging genre that defining it almost defeats the purpose of the genre itself. In one sense, it refers to anything that defies the conventions of traditional narrative and documentary cinema. It doesn't have to tell a story. There don't have to be characters. There doesn't even necessarily need to be a message of any kind. It can be visceral or mundane, engaging or a complete bore. It can be highly personal or overtly political. It can be literally anything.

On the other hand, experimental film is an aesthetic and aural art form. Film inherently takes some of the most expressive elements from other artistic mediums and combines them into a magnificent smörgåsbord of sight and sound. All films have elements of photography, music, painting, dance, etc. However, narrative and documentary films don't necessarily use all of these artistic elements to their full potential; they're more focused on creating an enhanced sense of narrative reality than creating pure aesthetic art. With experimental films, however, the extent to which these elements can be mixed and manipulated to evoke or portray emotion or ideology is infinite.

As a result, experimental filmmaking is an absurdly powerful artistic medium that can be matched by few, if any, other art forms in terms of pure expressionistic potential. If that's not reason enough to get started with this fantastic genre, here are a few more of its copious benefits.

Benefits of Experimental Filmmaking

There are numerous reasons why you might want to make experimental films alongside (or instead of) narrative and documentary films. These reasons are varied, and there are certainly more than I can list and write about here. But the following reasons should give you a basic sense of why experimental filmmaking might just be one of the most beneficial things that you can do as a filmmaker.

Creative Freedom: First and foremost, this type of filmmaking is one of the most creatively freeing things that a person can do. Narrative filmmaking, like it or not, is all about restraint in what you show and how you show it. Even the narrative films that break away from convention are subject to the idea that every image and every sound needs to be in service of the story and the characters.

With experimental filmmaking, however, you're free to throw any and all restraint to the wind and make creative decisions that would be "unacceptable" in the world of narrative film. You can express emotions, ideas, concepts, and literally anything else through literal or abstract imagery, through juxtapositional editing, through creative use of sound design. You can disregard the technical, and focus solely on the creative.

Still frame from "Control Freak" by Robert Hardy

Spontaneity: In narrative filmmaking, it's difficult to be truly spontaneous. When time is money, which it always is in a narrative environment, people tend to stick to the schedule and get the shots they need to tell the story. This isn't a bad thing in the slightest, but it's not conducive to creating art, which requires at least a certain amount of spontaneity.

With experimental filmmaking, creative decisions can be well thought out choices made prior to shooting, or the shooting can be a spontaneous act of expression in and of itself. When you're not burdened with schedules and  shot lists, and the AD isn't hassling you to get the next shot set up, you are free to make creative decisions as you see fit, right on the spot.

Still frame from "Night Music" by Stan Brakhage

Personal Expression: Narrative filmmaking, by its very nature, is a collaborative craft. In order for narrative films to be made properly, it takes dozens (if not hundreds) of individuals, each with a specific role in the production of that piece. Even though we still promote the idea of the auteur in our current filmmaking climate, pure personal expression is nearly impossible in an environment where hundreds of unique voices coexist. Don't get me wrong, creative collaboration is a fantastic thing, and it's the best way to make narrative films, but it can be detrimental to the idea of the personal art.

Experimental filmmaking, however, offers filmmakers the ability to express whatever the hell they want, in any way they want. Your cat just died and you're all torn up inside? Make a film about it. Girlfriend dumped you for a guy named Chad? Make a film about it. The point is that making films like these can be both cathartic and productive, and oftentimes the process of making the film can help you resolve, or at least gain perspective about whatever issues you might be going through.

Still frame from "Abstractions in Night" by Robert Hardy

Social Expression: A good many narrative films have cultural, social, political, or religious undertones implicitly stated through narrative conventions. However, when tremendous amounts of money are on the line, investors and EPs tend not to want their finished films to be political or religious statements due to the fact that those types of films alienate audiences, which is the last thing you'd want to do in the pursuit of making a commercially successful film.

Just like the previous section, experimental filmmaking allows you to focus your creative efforts squarely on the statement that you're trying to make with your film, without any of the back and forth politics that come with narrative filmmaking. If you want to make films about your displeasure with the US Congress, then you can make the most scathing critique known to man. That's your prerogative as an experimental filmmaker.

Still frame from "An Experiment in the Revival of Organisms" by Robert Hardy

Creative Betterment: With experimental filmmaking, anything and everything is possible. You can try things with the camera that you would never think to do on a narrative set. In the editing room you can stack, manipulate, and composite video to your heart's content. You can create the most mundane or insanely abstract images and sounds and re-arrange them in any way you see fit.

When you have no creative restrictions, you're more likely to try new things and, well, experiment. It's through this experimentation that you can begin to bolster your creative toolset, and create and master techniques that you may be able to incorporate into your narrative and documentary films.

Still frame from "Birth Rite" by Robert Hardy

Defining a Unique Cinematic Voice: It might seem fairly cynical of me to say this, but most narrative films these days are all strikingly similar to one another in terms of their style and what they offer the audience in an artistic sense. Most of us grow up watching and studying the same films, and when it comes time to make our own, we draw from the same cinematic vocabulary that most other filmmakers are using. The result is relative conformity.

In my opinion, that's what makes filmmakers such as Steve McQueen so successful and prevalent today. As someone with a background in fine art and video installation art, McQueen has forged a unique style and perspective that has allowed him to take the narrative filmmaking world by storm with his three features. No one is making films like McQueen, and that can be at least partly attributed to his early career as an experimental filmmaker and artist.

In the same vein as McQueen, you can begin to develop your own unique cinematic voice through an exploration of and involvement in experimental filmmaking.

There Are No Wrong Answers: In the world of narrative and documentary cinema, there are definite guidelines as to what constitutes a good or a bad film. Whether or not a film is good or not all depends on the writing, the directing, the acting, the cinematography, the editing, the sound, and so on. With experimental cinema, however, these "restraints" can be tossed out the window because expression is the primary purpose, not technical perfection.

This might sound like a cop-out, and to a certain extent, it is. With that said, just because the primary goal of this type of expression doesn't mean that we should be sloppy in the technical aspects of making these films. However, technical knowledge isn't a prerequisite for experimental filmmaking. There are no major barriers to speak of. You don't necessarily need a camera or an in-depth knowledge of After Effects. The only thing you really need to get started is an inherent desire to create and express yourself.

Conclusion

Experimental filmmaking is a world all its own, and it's one that is often overlooked by the majority of filmmakers these days. It certainly shouldn't be, though. It's a unique and powerful art form that provides countless benefits beyond the fact that it allows us to be artists in the truest sense of the word.

In order to get you guys even more stoked about making experimental films, here's one of the greatest of all time, Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S03Aw5HULU

In our next article, we'll talk about the easiest way to get started with making experimental films, the "found footage" film.

What do you guys think? Do you have any experience with experimental filmmaking? If so, what did you think of it, and what were the benefits (or disadvantages) of that experience? Let us know in the comments!

Your Comment

42 Comments

great!

November 11, 2013 at 10:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
DIO

This is awesome. I've been wanting to create some experimental work, exactly for the reasons you stated—namely to grow creatively. Looking forward to the rest of these articles. Post some links to your experimental work, Robert!

November 11, 2013 at 10:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

Thanks David! Hopefully this series will do just that, help people grow artistically and create work that is unique to them. I'm also hoping that we'll all be able to share the work that we're making and discuss it and critique it and help each other grow as artists.

Here's a link to one of my favorite pieces that I made in film school. Let me know what you think!

https://vimeo.com/32390532

November 11, 2013 at 2:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

Experimental filmmaking is like abstract art. Some people love to stare at an ink stain and wonder what it means. Most people just see an ink stain and move on. Ultimately, the art form has more meaning for the maker than the viewer.

Having gotten my filmmaking degree from a film school notorious for its experimental film emphasis, having studied reels and reels of experimental films, and having directed the university's film festival (which was awash with experimental films), I can credibly say that most experimental filmmaking, to me, feels like amateur work in the guise of avant garde profundity.

Yes, Meshes of the Afternoon and other works containing some sort of narrative arc can be enlightening. I appreciate those experimental films. However, the "filmmakers" who shoot out-of-focus, under-exposed, dual-exposure, mirrored-imaged random stuff with no structure whatsoever? Well, that's another story.

November 11, 2013 at 11:36AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

3
Reply
Ben Jobe

I think you have to look at experimental film with more of an "art" perspective than a traditional "film" perspective. It seems to be an entirely alternate use of the medium, so to judge it by the same criteria wouldn't be very appropriate.

November 11, 2013 at 12:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Pat

Ben you obviously don't understand experimental film, you have to watch it through the eyes of an artist not a film maker, and if you are being concerned about , "the “filmmakers” who shoot out-of-focus, under-exposed, dual-exposure, mirrored-imaged random stuff with no structure whatsoever? Well, that’s another story." then that tells me you are a film maker not an artist, experimental film is NOT for film makers or people who watch narrative film nor should it be, its for a completely different demographic and maker, who use abstract and non narrative as a tool and who often reject the moving image outside that genre. Film makers need to stay out of experimental film and video art until they have the toolkit and appreciation to make or watch it. Film makers have a different set of values and expectations than what is needed for experimental film. And thats why THX1138 is such an amazing film because it travels into both experimental and narrative film, even as Austin suggested, and I agree, 2001 does this as well with the star gate sequence. In saying this, experimental film makers need to stay out of being a 'film maker' and working in industry until they too have the appropriate tool kit and understanding of what is needed to contribute and work in the industry.

November 11, 2013 at 5:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
shaun wilson

I totally understand, but like the author said it comes totally from a place of artistic ambiguity, and that being said, there is no saying what an out of focus shot means or what underlining message comes with over exposed footage. Anyway my point is, since you have such tremendous knowledge in the matter, be kind enough to suggest a cloud of elements that perfectly capture experimental film-making.

November 21, 2013 at 7:04AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply
moha

Great Article. I have lacked focus in working on my main projects. I always looked at this style as what you do when you get out of film school. But just letting go and being free to do whatever comes to mind sounds refreshing right now. Experiment with a youthful enthusiasm. It is a good way to unlearn some rules.

November 11, 2013 at 2:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

6
Reply
Jon Gustavson

Experimental film shouldn't have any "guidelines" like u said!

Though I will add, your film title should be experimental as well like "the exploitation of Ryan koo's innuendo"
, "the time of now", inconsistency of straight lines" . Am I the only one to notice such naming of titles in experimental films

November 11, 2013 at 2:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
thadon calico

I would totally watch a film called "The Exploitation of Ryan Koo's Innuendo". In fact, I'm tempted to make that film.

November 11, 2013 at 2:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

Hahaha...how about "the Hardy propaganda: a guide to visual stimuli"

November 11, 2013 at 3:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
thadon calico

I've been experimenting with letting my friend's experimental music tracks inspire my visuals.
from the silent film era:
https://vimeo.com/77539458
from the future:
https://vimeo.com/79053227

November 11, 2013 at 2:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
alan

These are really cool! The first one is so emotional and beautiful and deeply affecting, and the second really creeps me out. It's kind of like a nature documentary gone horribly awry haha.

November 11, 2013 at 4:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

November 11, 2013 at 5:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

12
Reply
shaun wilson

That looks marvelous, and really well shot too! What's the concept behind the film? Is it 51 experimental vignettes that provide insight into the human condition, or something along those lines? That's the vibe I got from the trailer.

November 11, 2013 at 5:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

Head over to 51paintings.com although Im redoing the website design, live soon, it reconfigures characters located in 800 year old medieval German paintings into new places so there is a 'memory' of the painting in each new location. All films are backwards and slowed down (and by the way in the 51 paintings trailer, two of the characters were completely 100% greenscreen and CGI but no one ever picks that up) so its a play or a 'protest' on how quickly editing is pacing itself these days. They're all best viewed as paintings that move, slightly in a 71 film. Music is stella now its in dolby. Series is a x5 feature length film series (slated 2006-2016) am shooting the remaining of film x2 now on a FS700 @200fps. The last act will be shot in a 5 minute continuous take @ 200fps 2K RAW using a 7Q recorder on the FS700, and making my actors walk backwards through the European painting section of the National Gallery of Victoria and out into the city streets (so its something like 'The Scientist' film clip) amidst people in rabbit suits, astronauts, 10 kgs of falling rose petals and Roman emperors. Going to be an absolute hoot. Self indulgent FS700 work? Of course! So much fun to do.

November 11, 2013 at 7:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
shaun wilson

Great read! But no mention of Kubrick? I think the last 5 minutes of 2001 a Space Odyssey heavily influenced/inspired experimental filmmaking and is one of the few examples of experimental filmmmaking succeeding in a popular film.

November 11, 2013 at 3:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

6
Reply

Nice one Robert, it's so important to throw caution to the wind sometimes and just explore. You can always learn something new and for a form that often seems so desperately limited I'm always amazed at how bonkers it still be and how you can take that into mainstream work without people batting an eyelid. I blame that totally on music videos!

November 11, 2013 at 4:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

12
Reply

Thanks Robin! I just read the first Filmmaker piece about AfterDeath, and I'm really stoked to see the finished film! You should shoot me an email, and we can talk about writing up an article about the making of the film.

November 11, 2013 at 4:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

Will do, it's been a proper journey! Been talking to Ryan about a piece on short film distribution that he should have the final version of now. I followed up AfterDeath with a 40min martial arts action love story which I'm just finishing now and that taught me every bit as much as the feature did. Been a crazy year! Bug Koo for my email address and let's talk!

November 12, 2013 at 1:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply

I like this! Great idea to do this, Robert. Looking forward to future installments.

November 11, 2013 at 4:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

Experimental film is my JAM, haha! Thanks for posting this! Maya Deren is fabulous and I've recently been bookmarking a ton of artists in this book I'm reading (simply titled "Art Cinema"). I'm pretty excited about Gillian Wearing's film "Self Made" which seems that it could be transformative, but it's not so easy to obtain a copy. People have commented about your missing some artists in here, but honestly there are such a vast array of talented experimental filmmakers I'm not sure you could easily even mention the most prominent creators in one article. For myself, I've been working on my own experimental project for over a year now, sotufilm.com. Always happy to see discussions on the importance of experimental work!

November 12, 2013 at 7:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

That's why like watching music videos and commercials a they keep the torch for experimental filmmaking very much alive. Even in "Meshes of the Afternoon" could easily be thought of as an early music video by the way the music incorporated with the imagery and vice a versa.

November 13, 2013 at 6:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Bolex16

I've been loving the CHVRCHES video Gun lately (https://vimeo.com/68399181) and I would love to create something like this! Experimental and artistic! but don't know how to go about editing something like this. Is it mostly done with a set of plugins I don't know about? Does anyone have any insight how to go about making something like this?

November 13, 2013 at 8:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Jeff M

You can use in camera or digitally, time strobe in FCP or Echoes effect in PPro or AE for a start but would take a bit of time to make something as complex as that clip. Just make a locked edit then throw in as many plugins as you can if you go down the digital route.

November 14, 2013 at 3:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
shaun wilson

p.s - a small thread with a few comments that you might find useful http://www.dvforums.com/forums/trace-phase-effect-70s-style

November 14, 2013 at 3:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
shaun wilson

Thanks Shaun this info has been a great start for me!

November 14, 2013 at 12:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

11
Reply
Jeff M

To me, the primary role of cinema in every facet is to communicate ideas by talking directly to the heart of an audience through their emotions. From documentary to narrative your goal as a filmmaker is to make somebody feel the importance of what you are showing them, whether its the plight of a protagonist searching for their family in the middle a war zone to something as small as the moments of dread felt as darkness closes upon you in a forest.

I think that cinema is most powerful when there isn't a separation between 'narrative' and 'experimental'. Narrative SHOULD be experimental, but not for the sake of it. It is a director's duty to communicate the truth of the feeling to us and being impressionistic is just one way of doing that.

The most compelling narrative cinema isn't afraid of being experimental to communicate with the audience. When a director does this in a way that is new to us: THAT'S when we are caught off-guard and a cinema can cut right to our core.

For what is cinema about but FEELING?

November 14, 2013 at 6:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

#cinema, not 'a cinema'

November 14, 2013 at 6:26AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

1
Reply

That is an excellent point, and those films that catch me off-guard like that are certainly some of my favorite ones. However, in order for a filmmaker to be able to do that to an audience, they need to have an understanding of how to manipulate image and sound in order to evoke emotion. That's where making experimental films just for the sake of making experimental films comes into play. If you can fiddle around, and create expressive experimental techniques, then you can certainly begin to incorporate those techniques into your narratives and documentaries.

I guess what I'm getting at is that experimental filmmaking can be a powerful tool for narrative filmmakers because it opens up a new world of potential expressionistic techniques that would have been unavailable otherwise.

November 14, 2013 at 10:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply
avatar
Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4502

I wholeheartedly agree with you, Robert. I suppose the thing that I'm slightly uncomfortable with is the distinction of 'experimental' as a genre, because every film is an experiment of sorts.

David Lynch, Nicholas Winding Refn, Lars Von Trier, Steve MQueen, Terrence Malick; experimental cinema exists in mainstream narrative. However, I know that you weren't arguing against this! - it just makes me very optimistic and positive about the state of popular cinema. Whenever somebody - my girlfriend being one of them- complains about 'Hollywood' and state of the industry, I'm quick to remind them of the quality forward-looking movies that come out every month and how lucky we are that experimental and challenging film is being funded and distributed. I do also appreciate that living in London I am very lucky that I have access to alot of this - but online distro is great so nobody really is out of the loop.

When one is first discovering how they want to make films- be it with a camera and a dream or even a crew of professionals- it is absolutely important to be encouraged to experiment with form and technique and everything. However, sometimes it can be confusing and frustrating (and it definitely has been for me in the past) as a young person learning who wants to be experimental, but not having any confidence to do so because I had not yet the resource of confidence or understanding of film to draw on to experiment with.
- It was like wanting to paint an interesting picture when you're given a bunch of amazing brushes that you're not familiar enough with to know how to use them.

A great thing that I think your article does is encourage people to experiment to find their own voice- to follow what they feel and discover their own vision. I agree that this is incredibly hard (an even nigh-on impossible) to do under the pressures of other people's money and time. You need to create for yourself to gain that confidence and experience to bring it to the big table.

Speaking from experience - last week I directed my first medium budget commercial. If it hadn't been for the short films and experimental, expressive pieces that I've made in my spare time along side my career as an editor, I don't think I'd have been half as confident in asserting my desired visual style for the film, my shot choices, direction of actors etc.

November 14, 2013 at 11:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

These experiments by both musicians and painters, men of wide experience with their primary art
material, have pushed this means of combining the two mediums up into our consciousness.

This new medium of expression is the Absolute Film.

Here the artist creates a world of color, form, movement, and sound in which the elements are in a state of controllable flux, the two materials (visual and aural) being subject to any conceivable interrelation and modification .
Mary Ellen Bute, "Light " Form " Movement - Sound," Design, New York, c.1935

November 14, 2013 at 5:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
KWA

I've recently found a love for this art form. I've always been into the surrealists such as Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali, but recently been exploring transgression artists like Stan Brakhage.

Here is a link to my latest piece of experimental filmmaking: https://vimeo.com/75404496

November 15, 2013 at 8:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

I was fascinated how theses minutes passed.

November 15, 2013 at 9:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

Thank you Robert, this is going to be a so needed insight to one major subject of filmmaking. While reading, I was thinking about how experimental filmmaking could and actually is an interesting space for creative/artistic collaboration between artists in a more focused, vibrant way. Actually, Maya Deren's "Meshes in the Afternoon" was a collaboration with her husband at the time, Alexander Hammid. There's even historians disputing the authorship of the film which has been preeminently attributed to Deren, some say unfairly. It brought also to my mind the collaborations between Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs documented by the director Antony Balch in the experimental film Ghost at n.9. I concur with you about how experimental films are a more personal expression, but I think there's also a deep collaborative path deeply attached to it that needs to be explored.

I look forward to read the upcoming articles; here's a link to my experimental individual work: https://vimeo.com/album/2290590 and a link to my experimental collaborations: https://vimeo.com/album/2290163 in case you are interested.

Thank you again for opening this window!

November 17, 2013 at 11:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply

I really should translate and publish my graduation thesis about the relation between experimental cinema and (experimental video in) mainstream movies.
Techniques developed by experimental filmmakers do appear in mainstream. Sometimes it takes 20 years, but it happens. Sometimes the experimental filmmakers is brought on board mainstream productions for certain visual effects. I.e. in 'the right stuff' the VFX were made by an 'experimentalist'.
The video in 'The Ring' also is a form of experimental cinema.
In American Beauty the flying bag is a piece of experimental video that is used to add poetry and deepen the characters.

As a student I made eperimental work as well. Most is still offline, but here is one example:
youtube.com/watch?v=U9UxcP-1RXY

November 21, 2013 at 6:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply

Cool and all that. But as you work on the "found footage" installment, remember there are issues of film rights. Sadly, just finished writing a letter to an outfit that "found" some of my images and are offering them for sale on their website as stock. Just asking you to make sure that the dimensions of ownership & copyright make it into the next piece. It can be an expensive mistake to pretend doesn't exist or apply to us.

November 22, 2013 at 6:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

i just did my first experiment in video-magic... check it out (if you want :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdimdF3cejs

more info here:
http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthread.php?108920-reach4thesky-(overcoming-filmmaker-s-block)

November 29, 2013 at 10:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

2
Reply

i made this film ith a msart phone i tried just to documenat my life experience somwhere i wanna know your feelings about it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOXDcMrLfHw
it exists in my website as well
thanks

April 3, 2014 at 5:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

2
Reply
MO

I am an artist from Morocco. I just do films in my way. I know all film schools, i have seen many films done by some film directors refered to as the best director in the world, i have seen many experimental films done by artists, i am an artist too i make films for me, in my way, i do not follow anybody, i do not take any body as a refererence, and i do not make films for money... my latest film is below shot with a smart phone
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOXDcMrLfHw

April 3, 2014 at 6:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

0
Reply
MO

July 11, 2014 at 5:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

3
Reply

Nice list, keep it up!

September 7, 2014 at 5:48PM, Edited September 7, 5:48PM

0
Reply
avatar
Diego Lope
Writer / Director / Producer
115