November 19, 2013

Everything You Need to Know to Get Started with Adobe SpeedGrade

Last month, Adobe released a major update for their creative video applications, which added, among other new features, the long-requested ability for a direct link between Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade. Before this update, there wasn't much reason to choose SpeedGrade over other grading applications such as DaVinci Resolve. However, now that the direct link between the two programs is in place, editors and colorists have plenty of incentive to learn SpeedGrade and incorporate it into their workflow. With that said, here's everything you need to know to get started with Adobe SpeedGrade.

These videos come to us courtesy of SpliceNPost, the NY based post house whose excellent DaVinci Resolve 10 video we recently shared. This series is pretty lengthy, but the depth and clarity of the information is absolutely fantastic. So get comfy and put on your learning hats, because it's about to get educational up in this hizzie:

These videos serve as an excellent introduction to the SpeedGrade interface. However, it's important to note that they were in reference to the CS6 version of SpeedGrade, and not the more recent CC update, which added a few Adobe-esque refinements to the interface and workflow. Here's a quick introduction video to what changed in the CC version of the application:

Once you have an understanding of the SpeedGrade interface, the process of grading and creating looks within the program is fairly simple and straightforward. Now it's not only possible to go back and forth between Premiere and SpeedGrade with relative ease, it's even easier to create distinctive "Lumetri Looks" within SpeedGrade that can be applied to your footage in Premiere.

These looks, and the ability to incorporate them into Premiere so easily, is one of the features that really sets SpeedGrade apart. You can use it just for the ability to create looks to use in Premiere. You can use it as a full-blown grading application at the end of your pipeline (it was a professional $30k grading system 3 years ago). Or you can use it as an extremely powerful supplement to the color tools already available in Premiere. It's a tremendously versatile tool that can be used any number of ways within the Adobe video ecosystem, and learning it can benefit your color workflows in numerous ways.

What do you guys think? Will you begin to use SpeedGrade as your primary grading application now that it has been incorporated into the Adobe video workflow? What other ways could you incorporate SpeedGrade into your color workflows? Let us know in the comments!

Link: SpliceNPost YouTube Channel

Your Comment

42 Comments

Good timing for this, thanks :)

November 19, 2013 at 9:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Micah Van Hove
Writer
director, producer, dp

I planned it to be well-timed for you, Micah.

November 19, 2013 at 10:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4283

Yes! For me too! Just switched completely to Premiere to edit my BMCC's RAW files and I love it! Good riddance to the other ancient crap I was editing on....

November 20, 2013 at 12:40AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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bwhitz

Describe the flow from BMCC Raw data to Speedgrade. Do you import as a sequence and then link that to move on to a grade? Or do you grade before linking from speedgrade into premiere?

November 21, 2013 at 4:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jared

Played around with direct link earlier and it seems to be everything we've been asking for. Or at least a great start in that direction. Not sure how well it would hold up on longer projects, but for commercials or shorts it's perfect.

November 20, 2013 at 12:06AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Matt

So what about Speedgrade vs Resolve ?

November 20, 2013 at 1:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Pierre

In my opinion Resolve still takes the cake. I can't stand Speedgrade's interface. Its so clumsy. I've been using it for about 3 months now and have given up. I'll take the extra couple of minutes it takes to get my footage to Resolve.

November 20, 2013 at 8:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ricky

Is the direct link with the CC version only or have they updated CS6 with it aswell? Sorry haven't been able to watch the vidz yet.

November 20, 2013 at 1:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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When opening a clip it gets shrinked into a tiny square at the bottom left corner and I can't find a way to fix that, find nothing about it and it drives me nuts!

November 20, 2013 at 3:04AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thanks for this, by far the best tutorial I've had on NFS. Always had a poke in Speedgrade but jumped right out not knowing where to start even after seeing a few tutorials. Not understanding the interface left me feeling overwhelmed, now I am armed to dive right back in... Thanks again!

November 20, 2013 at 3:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I'd go with CC if I could pick and choose the applications I wanted at a reasonable price (say £30 for three), but I'm not paying £50 a month for half a dozen apps I'm never going to use. It's a fucking joke Adobe need to sort their pricing structure out.

November 20, 2013 at 5:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Filthy Punt

The update was released only a couple days before I entered the grading phase of a 14min documentary I produced for Adidas. So I decided to try grading it with Speedgrade (as I edit on Premiere CC) and it worked perfectly. The ability to grade not only the Premiere clips but also all the After Effects comps included without any rendering or other waste of time is amazing.

I have to say that the last CC upadates have been amazing. The improvement in stability also has been great. After weeks working on a Premiere Pro project including After Effects comps, use of third party plugins (Element 3D and Optical Flares) and going back and forth to Speedgrade, I have yet to experience a single crash or bug.

November 20, 2013 at 5:22AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Haroun Souirji

I totally agree. 7.1 is amazing.

November 20, 2013 at 11:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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marklondon

I've totally switched to SG. In years past, I heavily used Apple Color, but after switching to Adobe programs after FCP X happened, I started using Colorista II.

I learned SpeedGrade and a little of Resolve, but never made the full jump to either for a variety of reasons. But now with Direct Link, I'm all in for SpeedGrade.

A huge bonus reason is because it can do three things I don't believe Resolve can (or I haven't found out yet how): 1) It can carry over Premiere Pro effects, namely FilmConvert. 2) It can handle AE comps that are Dynamically Linked. 3) It handles multicam clips from Premiere like a champ.

The first two are the biggest deals for me. I use FilmConvert pretty frequently and almost always have multiple AE comps in my time line. So, bravo Adobe!

November 20, 2013 at 7:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Hi!

I am looking in to doing the move to SG but I have trouble sorting out what thrid part HDMI/SDI card to get to be able to use my broadcast monitor. I currently have the BM intensity but it is not supported. I am a mac Pro user. Any one that knows anything about this?

November 20, 2013 at 7:46AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Try any of the aja boxes, i still use the io express and it works great with speedgrade.

November 20, 2013 at 8:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Iyke Chukwu

David, I've been using a AJA Kona LHi card but, I recently switched to a Black Magic card to run Resolve. I highly recommend AJA as they answer their phone and have fantastic customer support. I'll probably sell my LHi card soon, if you're interested.

November 20, 2013 at 11:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thank you for this post! I've been muddling through Resolve and could never quite get the final look I wanted simply because I didn't have a total understanding of what I was doing and didn't have the time on a project to really dive in. On my most recent two projects I used direct link from Premiere to Speedgrade and I actually got a satisfactory look without all the extra jazz!

November 20, 2013 at 7:46AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Nate

but can you import .cube LUTs or do you need to have them converted somehow? I am pretty much totally dependent on Captain Hook's awesome button BMCC LUT right now and if I can't get it to work in Speedgrade I don't think I would switch out of Resolve Lite.

November 20, 2013 at 8:29AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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James

I have no issue using that LUT in Premiere and SG.
I use that and Hunters Alexa LUT extensively.

November 20, 2013 at 11:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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marklondon

I use the same LUT both Premiere and Speedgrate - works great!

November 21, 2013 at 2:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Clayton

Can nofilmschool.com get any better? Nope. Don't think so. Thanks!

November 20, 2013 at 9:36AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ben Corwin

Çan you grade in here Cinema DNGs RAW form the BMCC?

November 20, 2013 at 10:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Miha Horvat

Yes just not the pocket camera yet

November 20, 2013 at 10:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Anthony Marino

In the first video, his "quick tip" was him explaining how a folder works for 6 minutes.

November 20, 2013 at 10:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Josh

Can anyone using Speedgrade currently tell me if it still has major crashing issues ?
When it was first released it was a grading game of russian roulette - which is a pity because it was pretty intuitive as an interface.

November 20, 2013 at 11:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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ben

Like I wrote above, I recently graded a doc with the version. I graded it directly from the premiere pro comp (on PC) that also includes After Effects comps and did not experience a single crash in the whole process.

November 20, 2013 at 12:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Haroun Souirji

Thanks Haroun, I didn't see your comment above, but I'll re-install SG and give it another chance.

November 20, 2013 at 3:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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ben

Long winded, I mean really, cut to the chase. This tutorial could have been compressed into 20 minutes. Work from a script in future perhaps. Good information, but too much "yada, yada. yada". I am sure even Elaine (Seinfeld) would agree.

November 20, 2013 at 11:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Simon

If he said "Dekstop" one more time . . .

November 20, 2013 at 2:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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these tutorials are outdated, the CC version's interface is totally different so looking at CS6 tutorials is a waste of time

if you want relevant stuff check this link

http://jonnyelwyn.co.uk/tutorials-for-film-post-production/adobe-speedgr...

one of the biggest challenges of SG is learning the shortcuts, the link has 2 pdf sheets for shortcuts that are very handy.

the link above bastically points to these tutorials from AdobeTV, but has the handy shortcuts pdfs in it

http://tv.adobe.com/show/learn-speedgrade-cc/

if you cut in PP, grading in SG is much faster than Resolve with the directlink in the new CC version, the only downside to SG compared to Resolve is the tracker, which is average at best

November 20, 2013 at 3:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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blackespresso

Yes, the interface has changed slightly, but not so much that these tutorials can be considered out of date or irrelevant.

November 20, 2013 at 3:23PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4283

Robert i appreciate your efforts, but these are outdated, check it for yourself, it's not just the interface, a whole bunch has changed:
http://www.adobe.com/products/speedgrade/features.html?PID=2159997

November 20, 2013 at 3:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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blackespresso

raw?

November 20, 2013 at 8:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Yes

November 21, 2013 at 12:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Matt

As much as I love this site, it's penchant for annoying hyperbolic article titles like "Everything You Need..." kind of bums me out. After being inundated with that kind of click bait crap on facebook all the time, I'd like to believe NFS is confident enough in the quality of their content not to need to resort to such tactics.

November 21, 2013 at 1:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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brent

... But what else do you need to get started?

November 21, 2013 at 8:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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C'mon, let's admit that it's a silly little click bait trend. I'm seeing more and more of this kind of thing across the internet, and it's just nauseating. These kinds of articles just as well could be titled "Getting Started With..." but apparently that just doesn't have enough pizzazz, amiright?

November 21, 2013 at 9:51PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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brent

Wow!

This is Clickbait?

Really?

Priceless!

November 22, 2013 at 1:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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wsmith

I'm not calling this clickbait. I'm saying it's great content that has an unfortunate, clickbait-esque title. So why not be great content with a less annoying title?

November 23, 2013 at 10:37PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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brent

Yeah, forget all these haters. Best tutorial vid I have seen so far, at times a little slow, but if it's the first time using this program, like me, then extremely helpful. I get the feeling that some people watching these tutorials were just looking for something else, bad luck for you that you couldn't figure out how to find it, or stuck on whatever problem you have. I mean really, it does say introduction to interface in the title, what were you expecting?

March 23, 2014 at 6:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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metatron

So get comfy and put on your learning hats, because it's about to get educational up in this hizzie - thanks your topic. http://www.chevrolethathanh.org/

November 4, 2017 at 3:05AM

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fordtranhung789
SEO intern
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