June 30, 2014

Matthews Now Has a Stand Designed Specifically for Sliders

Matthews has new stands that were designed with sliders in mind. If you're using heavier cameras and heavy-duty sliders like the Dana Dolly or even Matthews' own slider, you need something supporting the whole rig at both ends. While you could use a smaller C-stand, the Matthews Slider Stand has a built-in Junior Receiver and is made to be more stable and versatile, allowing you to level easier with two rocky mountain legs. Here is the introduction video, followed by a demonstration of the stand:

Some info on the stand:

The Slider Stand meets the demand for a strong, wide-based stand with a low working height for those using camera sliders and Speed Rail/Pipe Dolly Systems like the Dana Dolly. Baby Ballhead (3/8") Adapter, Magic Finger and Stand/Spud Adapter sold separately.

The Slider Stand comes standard with two rocky mountain legs for easy leveling on hills, mountainsides, rocky environments, stairs and most other uneven terrain. As a comparison, the Slider Stand minimum working height measures one foot (30cm) lower than the standard low boy combo, giving the camera operator a POV range from hip to eye level.

And the specs:

  • Comes with Welded Junior (1-1/8") Receiver
  • Adapters Include Baby Ball Head, Magic Finger with 5/8" Adapter, and Stand/SPUD Adapter 1-1/8" to 5/8"
  • Collapsed Height: 25" (64cm)
  • Weight: 14 lbs.
  • Capacity: 80 lbss (36kg)
  • Maximum Height: 46" (117cm)
  • Minimum Height: 24" (61cm)
  • Footprint: 37" (94cm)

Even though it is being marketed as a slider stand, it can obviously be used as a low boy junior, and with adapters can mount virtually anything in a low configuration:

This is made for heavy-duty rigs, and it has a price to match those more expensive rigs. While it's probably a cheap rental and may even be included with something like a Dana Dolly kit, if you want to own some for yourself, the stand is going for $286 on B&H (it's a little more directly from Matthews), with the adapters ranging in price. For more on the Slider Stand and adapters, check out the Matthews site.

Links:

Your Comment

21 Comments

you can buy two bike stands cheaper than that, and small bit of modification, if you want to make money invent the obvious, and put video/HD/rig on the side and charge 3 times the actual sale price.

June 30, 2014 at 2:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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There are DIY solutions to everything, and we cover a lot of them, but if you're balancing tens of thousands of dollars a few feet above the ground, sometimes it's better to trust things that will just work without question. Considering that grip gear will likely outlive everything else in your kit, it's not a bad investment.

June 30, 2014 at 2:53AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Joe Marine
Camera Department

These slider/light stands do look very heavy duty, but are they worth $600 bucks for two, without the other gear needed to setup the slider? These stands will be GREAT for pro-level shoots with two RED Dragons setup to record 3-D, or some other similarly heavy rig (like God-forbid an actual film camera!), but otherwise, you can just get the Glidecam VistaTrack 10-48 Track and Dolly Slider for around the same price as just two of the Matthew's legs by themselves.

June 30, 2014 at 2:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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neil

i wanna show to my friends also.

June 30, 2014 at 2:57AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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surendra rana

I can just buy C-Sands at a better price!

June 30, 2014 at 9:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Lorenzo

C Stands can still be a little wobbly on slider moves if you've got a heavy rig on top, and dana dolly recommends junior stands for that reason specifically. Unless you're kitting out your grip truck, these probably aren't ideal, but they serve their purpose. I'd love to have a pair.

June 30, 2014 at 10:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Chuck

It is pretty clear they weren't trying to balance quality and expense here. They built the best product they could and it costs what it does.

June 30, 2014 at 10:00AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Actually, these are nothing more than a re-purposed product from their old catalog. They are the old Mathews umbrella stands. Some came with no risers and some came with riser extensions, like the ones posted. They put some fancy spreaders on them and added a 3/8" to junior stud adapter to justify the cost of reopening a production run on an otherwise obsolete stand. Any low combo stand will suffice as long as you add the 3/8" adapter and the low combo stand serves double duty as an actual light stand when a slider is not in use. To purchase these as a specialized piece is a waste of money.

June 30, 2014 at 11:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mike W

I can't possibly image who would want to use these. This product has gotten the concept completely wrong. Portability and quick setup are the KEY features of the slider setup. How often do you want to take the time to set up two heavy-duty stands and then your slider? It really doesn't seem like these were designed by anyone who actually has shot with a slider before.

June 30, 2014 at 1:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mike D

If you're rigging a camera that weighs 30-40 lbs, and costs $100,000, you're definitely going to want the support.

July 1, 2014 at 10:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dembek

I think its a better option than the ultra low boy because it goes up to 4 ft high vs 3 ft also easier to balance it better. Thank you - I think i'll buy these.

June 30, 2014 at 2:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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having used used C stands, saw horses, apple boxes, short baby or junior stands, these are the deal. considering you can also use them are regular short light stands is bonus. You never regret getting the good stuff when you use it all the time and it makes your job simpler, better and faster. you always hate buying the cheap stuff thats always a frustration, does an inferior job, takes more time to setup, and just doesn't look professional in front of clients. while they are a little bit pricey, I would of expected $200 ea, they are still a long term investment that will still work 20 years from now over your next 5 cameras that will cost an awful lot more.... and really these are fast to work with compared to some other "solutions". the double mountain legs are a great idea and faster / safer than alternatives like apple boxes or digging the legs into the dirt if you can.

June 30, 2014 at 6:59PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If you use a Dana Dolly a lot with a full camera rig, this is a nice step up from older baby stands that can get wobbly. It's not intended for DIY shoots.

June 30, 2014 at 7:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If I had the money I would buy them but I will find a cheaper option for now. These are overpriced like everything else made to be used on a film set.

July 1, 2014 at 12:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Added to my "buy list".

A much more stable solution than "micro" c-stands (they get tippy).
I wish I had these for my shoot back in April... where I ended up using a hi-hat and a junior receiver (both screwed to pancakes and sandbagged as much as possible).

July 1, 2014 at 7:56PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If you are using the Dana Dolly, American Grip makes low boy combo stands specifically for use with the Dana Dolly. They are only $185/ea. My friend has them and they work really well.

July 1, 2014 at 8:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Alan

These are definitely an improvement over the standard low boy combo stand you often see under a dana dolly, mostly because the height range (and ease of adjustment) is more useful. However, using a "stand" under a slider when you need more complex moves (tilting while sliding for instance), is generally fraught with problems, as the column (shaft of the stand) is just too wimpy to support the slider when forces applied to it are in other directions than "down".

We welded a threaded plate to the top of each of our dana dolly rail clamps, on which a 100mm bowl adapter lives (the rail then sits on top of two sets of tripod legs or couple of enduro high-hat pods). We get a similar height range and infinitely more stability out of this option, and leveling the rig on uneven ground is much simpler than any stand solution.

July 3, 2014 at 12:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Matthews ended up on my shtlst. I bought three of their C-stands. One of them was poorly assembled. I called Matthews three times trying to get a person who could walk me through fixing it. (The legs were too tight and binding.) Each time I got a ruder, less helpful person. I gave up, fixed it myself. There are far worthier companies in this biz.

July 3, 2014 at 8:00PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dav

Much of what is designed for DSLR or larger cameras is very expensive, and I don't see the justification for the price in many items. These stands, however, are fantastic. I bought a couple of Matthews C stands for my studio and was astounded at the size/strength and build quality. These stands are built to the same standards and will last many years. As for not being practical for slider use, instant setup means cheap, single-use type gear. Seriously, what is 30 second setup compared to trashing many thousands of dollars of camera? I bought a first rate slider, so I want first rate support. I can't afford to replace my cameras and lenses to a shaky stand. Besides, they look really cool! First impressions are important for clients, especially those who don't know what the gear is for. These are impressive. As for expense, one of my lenses costs twice what two of these stands costs. I'll need to work out a bit to carry the weight, but then at 14 lbs each, maybe I can skip the 30 lbs of sand bags needed for cheaper, lighter stands. Way to go Matthews - yet again.

July 6, 2014 at 11:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Warren

I bought a pair from B&H. Took over a month to gat them delivered. Amazing piece of kit! Would buy another pair without question. If you are bickering over price or usefulness then you don't get it. Pro gear is for pros.

August 13, 2014 at 9:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Christopher

Just bought the Dana Dolly 1 Rise Low Combo w/Top Channel from American Grip, they released their model over a year ago, top build and its essentially the design Mattews seem to look at when they were designing this stand and most importantly its $100 cheaper. You will be saving $200 for the pair buying from American Grip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aje-KWQSnNQ

August 31, 2014 at 7:13AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Sura