September 25, 2014

MōVI M10 & RED EPIC Shoot a Violent Rube Goldberg Machine in This Totally Badass Video

Some things are just meant to go together. Peanut butter and jelly, coffee and doughnuts, and of course, the MōVI M10 image stabilizer and a Rube Goldberg machine. It truly is a match made in heaven. But don't just take my word for it. Have a look for yourself:

https://vimeo.com/106774972

This video, which is a commercial for the Panasonic ToughPad, was shot by DP and Pre-Vis artist Matt Workman. The production used a RED EPIC with Leica Summicron lenses, all mounted to a MōVI M10, in order to smoothly follow the path of a Rube Goldberg machine hellbent on destroying the Panasonic tablet. In an awesome series of BTS photos, Workman showed just how much work goes into a shoot like this. Here are a few favorites.

Rube Goldberg Movi M10 Set BTS Photo
Credit: Matt Workman
Movi M10 Red Epic Summicron Wireless Follow Focus
Credit: Matt Workman
And here's the Pre-Vis piece that Matt built for this video:

https://vimeo.com/99193891

Ultimately, as awesome as this piece is, it's hard not to wonder how it might have looked as a single long take. With that said, some of the inserts and cutaways in the piece, especially of the pool balls and the fish in the water tank, make the video feel extremely dynamic and energetic.

What do you guys think? Would this piece have worked better as a single long take?     

Your Comment

35 Comments

Panasonic Toughpad.
Please correct that.

September 25, 2014 at 5:20PM

1
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DJ
81

Panasonic ToughPad. Not Samsung :)

September 25, 2014 at 5:21PM

0
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Tom Ellingsen
VFX Artist/Director/Actor
88

It's a Panasonic not a Samsung.

September 25, 2014 at 5:22PM

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Darren Wolff
Self Shooting PD
502

I mean...it's nice..but with so many cuts and so bad framing...it loses all the magic of this kind of stuff..

September 25, 2014 at 5:31PM

11
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Agreed.

September 25, 2014 at 5:37PM

5
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Josh Paul
Most often DP, Direct or Gaff
1106

The cuts ruin it. The magic of a Rube Goldberg machine is that it seems to run itself. You get no sense of that here. In fact it feels like the machine didn't work properly (it was broken). And there are several places (like the drone) where express interaction is needed from outside the machine for it to continue operating which feels like a cheat. For me this means the video fails. There is lot to learn from this failure as a filmmaker. Most simply,"ok, don't do that." It just feels like a shame winch they clearly had so many resources. I wonder what the limiting factor was. Did they run out of time? Did they over reach the budget they had? (Blow it on the car) or did they just not plan enough? Or was this their intention? And what can be learned from that? Thanks for posting.

September 26, 2014 at 9:20AM, Edited September 26, 9:20AM

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Michael Markham
Actor/Filmmaker
862

the inserts and cutaways distract you from the mechanics of the machine and sort of makes you feel that they faked some of the transitions (even if they didn't!).

also I don't get the car being smashed in the end...

September 25, 2014 at 5:34PM

5
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Fernando Mamede
director/dp
162

They just needed a bigger rock.

September 25, 2014 at 5:38PM

1
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Josh Paul
Most often DP, Direct or Gaff
1106

exactly!

September 26, 2014 at 2:36PM

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Fernando Mamede
director/dp
162

I agree, this was awesome but I'm use to seeing people use the Movi to do insane one-take videos.

September 25, 2014 at 5:35PM

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Josh Paul
Most often DP, Direct or Gaff
1106

I thought it was cool, but wish it was a wider lens, and maybe one take. Or two angles shown at once, since so much was happening at one time, it would have been a bit farther out to really see everything that was happening.

September 25, 2014 at 5:41PM

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Caleb Price
Director
462

The very first cut happens at 00:16 and never recovers.

This is not how you show-off such a wonderful device.

Amirite?

September 25, 2014 at 6:09PM, Edited September 25, 6:09PM

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Alex Zakrividoroga
Director
3815

Exactly, with a Rube Goldberg Machine, I don't care what you shot with, or that you used a MōVI device, I just want to see the machine do it's thing.

September 25, 2014 at 6:14PM

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Caleb Price
Director
462

the amount of work that went into making this is intimidating

September 25, 2014 at 6:10PM, Edited September 25, 6:10PM

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Ogy Stoilov
Director
246

How does a rock hitting the hood of a car while the device in the backseat prove that the said device is durable? I dont understand the logic.

September 25, 2014 at 8:05PM, Edited September 25, 8:05PM

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treykaiza@gmail.com
Cat Herder
276

lol I had the same exact thought

September 26, 2014 at 2:08AM

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Micah Van Hove
Writer
director, producer, dp

This is the first time a MoVI video disappoints me. And it's not the cuts that distract me. Ever since I felt the stabilization quality of the MoVI Rigs was on a par with steadycam shots. Maybe it wasn't calibrated or operated properly, but in this video the movement of the camera lacked the weightless feel of shots like these: https://vimeo.com/72021084 (where they even shot from a horseback!).

September 25, 2014 at 8:07PM

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the stabilization problem you see i believe is the power brick on the side of the camera itself.
freefly sells this vmount or gold mount adapter plate for camera side but this significantly overloads the weight capacity of the movi m10. It is already over limit from my experience with the red dragon + lens+teradeck+ bartech (or some kind of wireless ff tranmitter) + motors + dtap splitter+cables.
This thing was built for dslr's originally and didnt expect users to rig this much weight.
This forces you to crank up the motor up so much and work hard. Also with the battery brick it probably does not hold it's place without the motors. It probably balances at "0" angle, tilt, pan, but probably resets if you just move it manually. It behaves this way when it is overloaded.

Also being japanese myself and having dealt with japanese ad agencies and corps as well, they always want to use the "new" thing. so for them shooting with a "Movi" on an over exaggerated set with a "Drone" with a "Dragon" and having BTS was urged.

September 26, 2014 at 12:26AM

8
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Kazu Okuda
Filmmaker
1328

Love the thought and the concept, just not a fan of the execution. I don't think the cuts at the start were intended, they were just recovery, to save running the entire shoot again (which, they mustn't have had enough cars for?). That I can understand, although it was distracting. I felt the MoVi really came to life in that shot where it was following behind the drone. Loved that.

For the most part, I was disappointed that all the damage was happening around the ToughPad, and not TOO the ToughPad.

But massive props to those guys for what they attempted and achieved. That would've been an insane amount of prep work.

September 25, 2014 at 9:11PM, Edited September 25, 9:11PM

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Ben Howling
Writer / Director
565

I felt similar. Yes its awesome that the device can be submerged and baked and dusted etc . . . But that damage was overshadowed by the big violence around the device. Which for me makes me think the device is weaksauce. Which it obviously isn't. For me, the advertisement backfires.

September 26, 2014 at 9:04AM

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Michael Markham
Actor/Filmmaker
862

Is it just me, or do the shots of the phone being carried by the drone look sped up about 15-20%? The physics of the tray tether velocities don't look natural, nor does the rapid level-correcting of the drone itself.

And I agree with others that all the cuts and obvious audio manipulations take away much of the raw magic that we've grown accustomed to in the 1,001 Rube Goldberg machine videos we've seen in the past 4-5 years. Still, it's quite an impressive setup and final assembly of footage.

September 25, 2014 at 9:25PM

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Brian Ireley
Digital strategist by daylight, Videomaker by moonlight
98

I like the fact there are cuts. It's very very easy to become intrigued and forcing a single take. It's like when all these super fast primes and slr videos started everything was too out of focus. with all these cheap gyro stabilizers coming out, we're going to start seeing a lot of very very bad single take long shots. The fact the footage was treated just as any other footage shot is what makes this work well in my opinion. With that said, im happy to see the bts images and see our movi setup is very similar

September 26, 2014 at 12:17AM, Edited September 26, 12:17AM

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Kazu Okuda
Filmmaker
1328

Uh, why was my post deleted?

I'm disappointed these guys didn't credit the artists they took their concept from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzbzlFAY4VE

Peter Fischli & David Weiss are great artists!

September 26, 2014 at 1:01AM

2
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PAT FISH
122

To add: I think the work is more engaging than most commercial projects I see, but it lacks conceptual depth. Peter Fischli and David Weiss, in their film "The Way Things Go", had a compelling basis for the techniques they employed.

Had Fischli and Weiss also used cuts their work would not be remembered as fondly as it is today. That would have defeated the piece.

And please, if you are a commercial videographer who borrows or appropriates another's work, please give credit...

Cheers all!

September 26, 2014 at 12:50PM

9
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PAT FISH
122

It's good idea but the cuts make me question them... :S

September 26, 2014 at 2:30AM, Edited September 26, 2:30AM

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Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7594

In my opinion it kinda feels too long and drawn out, I feel like there's one of these commercials every couple of months and it's lost its wow factor, the cuts don't help either. It didn't make me want the phone any more after the ad then before. It's just another clone, a good ad has a story or something new and exciting

September 26, 2014 at 3:11AM, Edited September 26, 3:11AM

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Paul
13

Anybody not bothered about Panasonic shooting an AD with a Red camera?

September 26, 2014 at 4:10AM

7
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it's silly but mostly i love the daylight/violet/pink lights set on second room in this video! :D hehe anyway! great! :D

September 26, 2014 at 4:39AM

0
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Not really a fan of this commercial, felt like this was a half failed attempt at a really ambitious, cool idea, that didn't quite come across as well as the DP had envisaged.

September 26, 2014 at 5:04AM

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Lloyd Will
Film maker
163

Hm. Boring. We all have seen this before with more awesomeness and fun. Lots of wrong framing for my taste, not a good example of MöVi use .. you could´ve done the same with even a small steadicam. And the useless cuts .. hm .. no.

September 26, 2014 at 6:32AM

0
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Steffen Hacker
Director, VFX Supervisor
167

Are you referring to: Peter Fischli and David Weiss, in "The Way Things Go"?

September 26, 2014 at 12:51PM

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PAT FISH
122

I really can't get enough of the original...a single analogue take!
http://youtu.be/jzbzlFAY4VE

September 26, 2014 at 12:54PM

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PAT FISH
122

Pretty Uninspiring to say the least. Not a true rube goldberg machine to begin with , but also missed some golden opportunities to show of the robust nature of the tablet. I would have been way more impressed if the device had taken the impact, as opposed to the gimmicky destruction of an unnecessary car. Just because it was shot with some nice gear doesn't make it good. Framing wasn't great, didn't really see any of the main events, and it was shakier than I'm used to from Movi gear. Poor effort really. People pay big bucks for this type of cowboy film making, which makes me a little sad for the little guy getting pennies to produce art.

September 26, 2014 at 4:22PM, Edited September 26, 4:22PM

1
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The cuts are actually not ideal for something like this. The rock on the car is stupid, I bet someone thought "lets just do it cause we can", so overall Close but no cookie

September 27, 2014 at 10:12AM

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Luna Videography
Videographer
597

There are plenty of examples of compelling Rube Goldberg machine videos out there with cuts; which means cuts themselves aren't the issue. The issue is badly timed ones that aren't compelling.

The bigger problem, though, is too many of the gags seemed unconnected to the piece as a whole, and not in a good way. It came across as if the creators didn't research/break down other Rubes and why they worked. They got the idea and run with it on a surface level and that was it.

Since awesome Rube videos are all over the internet in SD on up, this vid should be presented as a great example of why the idea matters way more than the equipment involved.

October 6, 2014 at 2:50PM, Edited October 6, 2:50PM

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dQniel Kaufman
Writer/Director/Editor/Color
74