September 18, 2015
IBC 2015

Meet the Tangent Ripple, a Color Correction Panel You Can Actually Afford

Tangent Ripple Color Correction Panel
Like most computer-based post production tasks, color correction is done most efficiently with some sort of interactive, tactile hardware tool. In other words, a control panel.

The only problem is that these color correction panels have traditionally been extremely expensive, and most of them still are. For example, the DaVinci Resolve control surface comes in at a whopping $30K, or roughly the price of a brand new Chevrolet Impala. While there are lower-end solutions ranging between $1000 and $2000, up until now there hasn't been something truly affordable that beginners and "occasional colorists" could use without opting for a bulky expensive panel.

At an expected price of $350, the Tangent Ripple will be far and away the least expensive control panel on the market, and the best option for low-budget filmmakers, students, and editors looking to bolster their color correction abilities. Here are the basic features of the Ripple:

Tangent Ripple Color Correction Panel
  • 3 trackerballs with dials for masters.
  • High resolution optical pick-ups for the balls and dials.
  • Independent reset buttons for the balls and dials.
  • Programmable A and B buttons.
  • USB powered with integral cable.
  • Light-weight compact size.

The other notable aspect of the Ripple is that it's extremely compact, especially by the standards of other control panels. The Ripple can live on your desk alongside a keyboard and a mouse, and be stashed away neatly when it's not in use. Like other Tangent panels, the Ripple will be compatible with Resolve, SpeedGrade, SCRATCH, and any other software that uses the Tangent Hub. It will also feature compatibility with Tangent's Element lineup of panels, as well as their Element app, so you'll be able to expand the functionality when you outgrow the Ripple's limited feature-set.

The Tangent Ripple is expected to be available in early 2016.      

Header & Body Images by Martin Luan Håndlykken via Erik Naso

Your Comment

21 Comments

This is awesome! Definitely going to have this on my radar towards the end of the year. Will it work the FCPX plugin Color Finale?

September 18, 2015 at 8:58PM

5
Reply
avatar
Tyler McDonald
Videographer/Editor
15

I don't think so. Not yet at least. It doesn't support Lumetri inside Premiere so I doubt it support any other software plugin.

September 20, 2015 at 9:05AM

0
Reply
avatar
Martin Håndlykken
Freelance ENG, videographer and editor
154

Obviously nice to see, but still somewhat frustrated that a Logitech trackball costs $30, and what's basically three trackballs with some knobs costs $350.

September 18, 2015 at 10:41PM

0
Reply
avatar
Andy Grover
Filmmaker
82

Indeed! I'm thinking that can the programming behind it really be that expensive to develop? Regardless, stoked for this.

September 19, 2015 at 2:26AM

0
Reply
avatar
Samu Amunét
Director
370

Not really fair to compare a tiny company with a big multinational, who obviously produces their products at a much lower price.

September 19, 2015 at 7:44AM

0
Reply

I wonder what a clever programmer could do with a few trackball mice, USB hub, and an Arduino.

September 19, 2015 at 9:35AM

0
Reply
avatar
Drew P
None
81

He/she wouldn't earn much money at all, given that people here still think this too expensive.
Hence why clever programmers aren't doing this.
Logic works.

September 19, 2015 at 12:21PM

0
Reply

Logitech will sell hundreds of thousands of trackball mice. Tangent will maybe sell thousands.

Small market tax. Or industry tax.

September 19, 2015 at 5:07PM, Edited September 19, 5:07PM

1
Reply
Conrad
1

Do you really have a problem paying just $350 for a highly specialised piece of equipment? If you're a student and want to grade at home it's a third of the price of the next cheapest piece of kit! And if you're working professionally a day's work or less could pay for this thing.

The quality of the manufacturing is probably (but not definitely, for sure) higher, and economies of scale mean that fewer of these are produced so the cost-per-item is greater for the manufacturer.

Oh course, even after that you are paying a certain amount of professional premium. But charge it to your clients! If you can't make money off it or it's not work the investment as a student, don't buy it.

September 22, 2015 at 7:08PM

0
Reply

This is absolutely perfect. So great solution for people who doesn't have 30K. I really looking forward for that.

September 19, 2015 at 12:49AM

0
Reply
Matus Havelka
Videographer
74

I was really impressed with the Ripple at IBC. Nice people who explained the philosophy behind them. Small, affordable, easy to use. Perfect for anyone starting out or anyone traveling and who needs to grade. The controls felt exactly like the ones on the more expensive Wave-deck.

As of right now it works with most grading software. Resolve and SpeedGrade at least. I asked if they would support Lumetri inside Premiere. They said not yet, but "most probably" in the future.

Good to see that my photos are of use!

September 19, 2015 at 5:23AM

4
Reply
avatar
Martin Håndlykken
Freelance ENG, videographer and editor
154

I used Tangent wave panel. It costed around 1.5K$ three years ago. I really loved it.

September 19, 2015 at 11:49AM

0
Reply
avatar
Einar Gabbassoff
D&CD at Frame One Studio
1046

Proving once again that things for "filmmaking" cost 3x as much as they should (what's the price of three track balls? less than $100). It's great that they're doing this, but the manufacturers charging thousands should be ashamed of themselves.

September 19, 2015 at 11:59AM, Edited September 19, 11:59AM

3
Reply

It's a relatively small market. Logitech sells hundreds of thousands of their trackball mice. Maybe millions. Tangent sells thousands. The cost for R&D and small manufacturing runs needs to be recouped somewhere.

I have the full Tangent Element set. Love them. Well worth the price. The full Resolve, Baselight and other panels are also worth their price (at $30k+) depending on the level of work you do.

Every time I buy a small piece of grip equipment for nearly $100 that required only a small amount of machining I shake my head. But I'm paying for something created for a specific purpose/job that does it better than anything else.

September 19, 2015 at 5:12PM, Edited September 19, 5:23PM

1
Reply
Conrad
1

This is beautiful! Thanks fore sharing this.

September 20, 2015 at 9:34AM

0
Reply

So from the comments here it sounds like there would be a lot of happy people if someone just made some software that combined three random USB pointing devices (which could happen to be trackballs, from a thrift store) into a single USB device that behaves like one of these obscenely expensive panels. Who's gonna be first? :)

September 20, 2015 at 5:03PM

0
Reply

Some people think everything is too expensive and then wonder why nobody wants to pay them proper rates for their efforts...

:-p

But, indeed:
who is going to be the first?
And can they provide customer support for the $0.10 of profit they are allowed to make on the total package? And will they be able to continue to develop their product further in the future.

Yes, some things are expensive.
That's because the cost of doing business is spread across a lower volume than something 'everyone buys'.

September 21, 2015 at 5:25AM, Edited September 21, 5:28AM

0
Reply
avatar
WalterBrokx
Director, DOP, Writer, Editor, Producer
8754

I'm confused, why would the profit someone is "allowed" to make on a fairly simple software widget necessarily be poor versus the level of effort required? Why would support necessarily be difficult? Why not even consider open sourcing such an effort? I think you misunderstood my suggestion.

You're talking about high and mighty concerns of corporations that produce professional hardware, and I'm saying a niche exists for some hobbyist to create some software that would help the millions of prosumers out there who cobble together DSLR parts to make their magic happen.

September 23, 2015 at 12:11AM, Edited September 23, 12:11AM

0
Reply

Great to see sfuff like this. Actually leads to higher quality work, and overall makes the equipment more accessible. Even though this has some downsides

September 21, 2015 at 4:08PM

0
Reply

Something i can actually Afford!!!

September 25, 2015 at 3:37PM, Edited September 25, 3:37PM

0
Reply
avatar
Wentworth Kelly
Director/DP/Colorist/Drone Op
2050

Good to see another panel on the market, but it's 90's sci-fi look strays from looking like a professional piece of gear. I'm also wondering how solid its base is given how plasticy the Tangent Wave feels.

October 3, 2015 at 12:19AM

0
Reply
avatar
Jake H. Harris
Filmmaker
149