November 29, 2017

GripUp Helps You Pick the Right Gimbal for Your Camera

With so many gimbal options, finding the right one for your camera package can be a challenge. GripUp just made it much easier.

The motorized gimbal market has exploded in the last few years and it often feels nearly impossible to keep track of which gimbal will work effectively with your camera package. While it might be easier to buy from market leaders like MoVi or DJI, unfortunately, those get pretty expensive, and if you are flying a smaller camera package, they might be overkill. With the new online tool from the UK rental house GripUp, you simply enter your camera/lens combination and it gives you three suggestions that help you narrow down choices for which gimbal options are available that will meet your needs.

Credit: GripUp

The app currently offers a lot of flexibility with a large inventory of cameras and lenses (starting with smartphones and going all the way up to the Alexa 65), along with the ability to work in both pounds (lbs) and kilograms (kg). Currently, the app focuses primarily on the weight of the unit, which is a key factor in the gimbal shopping process, but not the only one. One key with gimbal selection is actually the size dimensions of the camera and if it's possible to balance the gimbal properly without running into the mounting arms. Hopefully, future versions of the tool will include the ability to add some accessories (like follow focus motors) to the weight calculation, and also judge whether the gimbal is physically capable of carrying the camera beyond just weight.

Credit: GripUp

GripUp's tool is also interesting because it really highlights the new way that camera stores and rental houses are keeping themselves relevant. A vendor has never been just a place to get gear. It's also been a place to get information. Will this camera work with this tripod? Can I use this lens with this camera body? Can I plug in these Kino Flo's in Peru? All of these are questions that rental houses can answer. Relationships with sales and rental houses bring you back to the same vendors over and over, not just because you knew you would get great gear there, but also because you would also get the information and support to execute your projects properly. Building tools like this, bringing that knowledge to the web space, is a wise move for any company—it not only helps users find the right gear, it also creates the halo effect of knowledgeability.

For more info, and to find the gimbals that work with your camera, check out GripUp for yourself.      

Your Comment

6 Comments

My professional advice: use a traditional Steadicam ;-)

November 29, 2017 at 3:18PM

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JeffreyWalther
Steadicam Operator
1400

November 29, 2017 at 3:38PM, Edited November 29, 3:38PM

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Zachary Lewis
Cinematographer
99

I do not know. But since the technology is no secret and quite simple, even this product should work. Depends on the material and workmanship.

November 30, 2017 at 11:40AM

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JeffreyWalther
Steadicam Operator
1400

why please?
I do not have neighter the gimbal and the steady but I wish to get one of those for my first shortmovie.

November 29, 2017 at 3:38PM

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I assume he is suggesting it because at some point in levels of production steadicam will be your only option.

Your equipment will outweigh the ability of gimbals, and steadicams are positioned to carry the weight in your hip and lower back verses arms like most gimbals without easyrigs.

Plus you look like a badass cyborg which makes you look cooler in BTS haha

November 29, 2017 at 3:44PM, Edited November 29, 3:44PM

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Zachary Lewis
Cinematographer
99

Because:

- Electronics suck. If something fails, the entire system fails. If your gimbal keeps spinning for no reason on a customer shoot... you'r f****** up.

- A gimbal does -for sure- take longer to setup than a traditional Steadicam. All that fancy crap with Bluetooth connection and app calibration. One day they work, the other not. On set, you have no time for such stuff.

- The gimbal gets distracted by attached cables to the camera (forces change the balance setup). "Controller: ooohhhoo... what is that weight?..... oooh oh.. I keep spinning... this should solve it!..."

- Weight/dimensions: I can load any weight I want until my back hurts. Setup time: 2 minutes. And I do not have to care the dimensions of the attached accessories.

- Direct control: You feel where the camera goes. On a gimbal, not.

- Motion: gimbals looks too robotic.

- Gimbals: Most overused tool in this century.

November 30, 2017 at 11:39AM, Edited November 30, 11:41AM

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JeffreyWalther
Steadicam Operator
1400