July 4, 2014

Cine Meter II Might Be the First App that Can Actually Replace Your Light Meter

Cine Meter II WideIt's safe to say that smartphones and tablets can do just about anything these days. For most of us, our phones have replaced calendars, alarm clocks, maps, newspapers, and a whole host of other things. The same can be said for many of the tools that filmmakers use on a day-in and day-out basis. There are slating apps, and shot-listing apps, and blocking/overhead apps, and apps that can teach you color correction. There have even been a few notable attempts at replacing light meters with an app, although most of those apps left something to be desired, especially compared to their real-world counterparts. However, one of the most promising light meter apps, Adam Wilt's Cine Meter, just got a major update that includes tons of new features that discerning cinematographers will love.

The original Cine Meter app was a smash hit among cinematographers largely due to the fact that it goes way beyond basic metering functionality. It also included two of the more helpful exposure tools that we utilize today, the waveform monitor and the false color display. Here's a rundown of what each of the tools in Cine Meter II are, and what they can accomplish:

Light Meter: shows you your stop as decimal readings (such as 3.2, good for cameras with EVF iris readouts) or full stops and fractions (like 4.0 1/3, good for cine lenses with marked iris rings). You can meter using shutter speeds, or shutter angles from 11.25º to 360º (especially useful when using Digital Bolex and Blackmagic cameras). You can add neutral density filter corrections and arbitrary exposure compensations.

Waveform Monitor: shows you how light levels vary within and across a scene. They show you how even the lighting is on a green screen or white cove, and let you see hotspots and imbalances at a glance. The waveform’s RGB mode shows you color imbalances in the image and gives you a handy way to check for color purity on a green screen or blue screen.

False Color Display: lets you define allowable contrast ranges, and see instantly which shadows are underexposed and what highlights risk clipping.

Cine Meter IIThese three primary functions are still the foundation of the updated app. So what all is new in Cine Meter II? Here's a quick breakdown.

  • Cinematographer-friendly controls let you set shutter angle, ND filter compensation, and arbitrary filter factors.
  • Use the front-facing camera for "lightmeter selfies" – use yourself as the model when lighting a set (not available on iPhone 3GS).
  • The zoomable spotmeter lets you measure light precisely from a distance (iOS 7 or later only, on iPhone 5, iPod touch 5G, iPad Air, iPad mini 2G, or later devices).
  • Add a Luxi™ photosphere for incident-light readings ($30 from ESDevices for iPhone 4/4S or 5/5S; support for other devices coming soon).

A few of these features are especially groundbreaking for cinematographers who are considering a metering app instead of laying down a load of cash for a professional light meter. The ability to add a $30 Luxi metering sphere essentially turns your iPhone into the rough equivalent of a combination spot/incident meter, which are incredibly expensive ($800) if you purchase the real-world equivalent from Sekonic. Additionally, unlike most metering apps, Cine Meter II is designed specifically for cinematographers, with cinematography-specific controls and options -- like shutter angles, T-Stops, filter factors, and frame rates.

Unlike its younger brother, which cost $5, Cine Meter II comes in at $20. It's definitely a steep price hike, but considering that Cine Meter II might be the first metering app that is truly capable of replacing a traditional light meter -- and even surpassing it in terms of the other exposure functionality -- $20 is pretty damn reasonable. For those of you who are interested in comparing the original Cine Meter to its second version, check out the chart below (click to enlarge):

Ultimately, Cine Meter II looks to be an excellent update to an already-excellent app. If you're an experienced cinematographer looking for the convenience of waveform and false-color displays for setting exposure, or if you're a beginning cinematographer who's hesitant to shell out the cash for a professional light meter, then the Cine Meter II app paired with a Luxi photosphere might just be an incredibly worthwhile investment.

You can read more about Cine Meter II here, and you can purchase and download it from the iTunes store.

Link: Cine Meter II -- Adam Wilt

[via Film & Digital Times]

Your Comment

58 Comments

Shameless advertisement. No review, no hands on, no pros and cons.

July 4, 2014 at 9:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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einar

Exactly. This blog has some cool stuff, but this is just completely an ad like you're saying. No review. No hands on. No pros and cons. When blogs get big enough and have a large reader base, they get $$ for writing ads. Actually, they may not have even written this themselves, or maybe just reworded it so it appears to come from one of their writers. Too bad. This knocks them down a notch for me.

July 4, 2014 at 10:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I am not gettin...

One thing I like about NFS is that I rarely have to check other blogs/sites to know when new products or updates for others I already own have hit the market. For me - this article worked just fine.

July 4, 2014 at 10:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If you knew Adam Wilt, who created the app, you would know that would never happen.

July 4, 2014 at 4:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Charlie

I don't agree, but I wouldn't care if it was. Seriously, why does it matter one way or the other? I didn't know about this before, now I do. I consider myself informed of something new that I can look into on my own, thanks to the article. I don't see what the problem is.

If people don't like it, they are free to make their own websites.

July 4, 2014 at 5:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Damon

I agree 100%. We now know of something that we didn't before I read this article. For $30 down load the app and test it against what you own and post that.

Thanks for the heads up.

Regards,
Rachael

July 11, 2014 at 10:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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NFS has become too hype-centric lately.

July 4, 2014 at 10:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Premini

So go somewhere else and quit your bitching

July 4, 2014 at 10:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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kwitcherbelyakin

Let's get this straight. No, this is not a paid advertisement, and if it were, it would be disclosed in full at the very top of the article. Secondly, the purpose of this article is to make our readers aware of this app because it is a unique filmmaking tool that can help you expose your images. If you take offense to us bringing new products and services to your attention, then this probably isn't the site for you.

July 4, 2014 at 11:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

Except that you didn't test it or compare it with even the most basic and widely used light meters out there. You made a claim that it could replace a traditional light meter without any data to support that claim.

July 4, 2014 at 12:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DP

This.

July 4, 2014 at 1:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Ryan Sauve

The claim is that it could POTENTIALLY replace a traditional light meter because it's capable of both reflected and incident readings, while providing features that are specifically geared towards cinematographers, whereas other metering apps (with the exception of Luxi) are specifically spot metering apps that are directed at photographers. Based on the feature set alone, this app, when paired with a Luxi photosphere, has the potential to replace a traditional light meter, or at least provide excellent supplementary exposure tools to someone who already has a light meter.

Nowhere in the article did I say that traditional light meters are no longer relevant or that everyone should ditch their meters for this app. I simply pointed out that this app is the first with a feature set that rivals meters costing 20 times as much. In my opinion, that's certainly something worth pointing out to this community of low-budget filmmakers.

July 4, 2014 at 1:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

This is called a product announcement. Sometimes, over the course of covering an industry that supports product launches and releases, a product releases to the market that an editor may feel is interesting or unique enough to be newsworthy. If that happens, the editor may publish a story detailing that product and the features or functionality they consider to be important.
Product announcements don't have to directly compare one product with another; their purpose is to notify the readership of products or services that may be interesting or relevant to them.

Usually, any sort of comparison, test, or review is published separately than a product announcement so as to not pollute one subject with another.

Now, not all publications bother with product announcements, and some have different standards as to what constitutes a newsworthy product announcement, so it's likely some websites will report on certain products hitting the market that others do not. If you would like to make an argument as to why this product is not newsworthy, then go ahead. Complaining about the mere existence of these announcements seems a bit ignorant of the genre of website you're visiting. though.

July 4, 2014 at 2:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mr Blah

If you're interested, I've done some side by side testing and the links are in a reply I made below ...

July 4, 2014 at 6:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Maybe you should try to get your money back you entitled Fuck.

July 5, 2014 at 2:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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adam

Well that was uncalled for :(

July 5, 2014 at 5:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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+1 I think this comment is completely out of bounds. Ryan has contributed many informative articles and comments to this site, his own, and I can only assume many others. Please let's not reward his efforts with asinine and abusive comments, but instead encourage him and others who positively add to the filmmaking community.

Thank you Ryan for openly teaching others and sharing your gifts and passion.

July 6, 2014 at 10:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Morgan Simpson

I bought the Luxi for one reason and that was to be able to calculate key/fill ratios easily with my phone. I was impressed at how accurate the software was at metering (really - comparable to a light meter) but thought it was pretty weak that such a basic feature was missing, especially considering that it should be super easy to implement (surely it's nothing more than a little maths isn't it?). Anyway - I have never used it since and the Luxi creators said they don't have any desire to add it as a feature so I'm wondering before I shell out $20 on this, does this have this feature? I'd be made up if it did :)

July 4, 2014 at 10:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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No, Cine Meter II doesn't calculate key/fill ratios... yet. It's on the list of upgrades (and yes, the math is trivial), I just have to figure out how to work it cleanly into the UI.

July 4, 2014 at 4:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Amazing, thanks man :)

July 5, 2014 at 5:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I have Cine Meter (1st version, not the II) on my iPhone which I seldom use, when I can't use my lightmeter. The 'detail' that's always overlooked by 'reviewers' is that the only mode is for reflected light, spot or not, since it's done through the phone lens. There is no way to have an incident reading, like with a lightmeter. So when the person who wrote this post titled it "Cine Meter II Might Be the First App that Can Actually Replace Your Light Meter", I must say it's a stretch. So people who question the validity of such a flattering post have a point. I'm not putting my lightmeter on eBay just yet...

July 4, 2014 at 10:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mikhail

That's the thing though. If you pair this app with a Luxi photosphere, you have the ability to take both incident and reflected readings. Whether it's as accurate as a traditional meter could be an issue, but for better or worse, this $50 combo could replace a full on light meter if you were so inclined.

July 4, 2014 at 11:14AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

Except that they addressed this issue in the damn article there is an additional lightsphere attachment that allows you to take incident readings.

July 4, 2014 at 11:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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t3hsauce

As far as I am concerned, if I have to take out an accessory, fix it to the phone then take a reading I'll just take out my lightmeter.

M.

July 4, 2014 at 6:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mikhail

So why don't you just do a test comparing the app's accuracy with a real pro meter? Not that difficult or time consuming. And that would be more useful than a tech feature list.

July 4, 2014 at 11:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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ronn

Good call. I'd actually be really interested in those results. I'll do a quick comparison with this app (paired with a Luxi) against my Sekonic 478 with the spot meter attachment.

July 4, 2014 at 11:55AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

I have done a side by side test along with my own thoughts comparing iPhone Apps, The Luxi, and the Sekonic 478D & 758Cine- which you can check out here: http://www.ryanewalters.com/Blog/blog.php?id=7779770271855456333

And here: http://www.ryanewalters.com/Blog/blog.php?id=1222011888909495377

The long & short of the results are that it is a handy tool to have if that's the only tool that you've got. But it doesn't work well in low light situations due to the limitations of the camera on the iPhone. It is also great that you don't have to carry around a separate piece of kit- which makes your belt that much lighter.

Hope that helps provide some real world experience. :) Happy shooting!

July 4, 2014 at 6:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Thanks Ryan. I read that review back when you did it. Thanks for that and all the other excellent and informative articles on your website. On light meters, ND filters, on critiquing your own DP work. You site is a fantastic resource.

July 5, 2014 at 1:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Taylor

Thanks for the kind words of support- glad you like my site and it has been helpful. :)

July 6, 2014 at 1:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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You should check out LUMU light meter :)

July 4, 2014 at 1:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Neil

I actually really love the design of the Lumu app. It's super functional and clean and stylish, unlike most of the meter apps out there. The only problem is that it's very much geared towards photography and doesn't have many cinematography-specific features. And their photosphere is a little on the expensive side compared to Luxi. But I guess it's still a hell of a lot cheaper than a real meter.

July 4, 2014 at 3:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

The Lumu folks told me they're planning on coming out with a cine-oriented app in the next few weeks, with "fps, shutter angles, ND filters, hi/low aperture selection". So if all you need is incident metering, you'll be all set.

July 4, 2014 at 4:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Damn. Android gets no love

July 4, 2014 at 3:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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t. cal

+1 Not every filmmaker is an Apple hipster ;)

I own Apple and have used Android and Microsoft. I feel each one has many pros and cons. I would love to see apps made to be available across more platforms, especially Android since it and Apple are the most common.

July 6, 2014 at 10:34AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Morgan Simpson

I'm the guy who wrote Cine Meter II. I can confirm that this article was not sponsored or paid for in any way; I hadn't even sent NoFilmSchool a press release yet; this was something that NoFilmSchool did on their own. I only found out about it because NoFilmSchool is suddenly driving a lot of traffic to my site (thanks, Google Analytics).

As to accuracy: if the darned thing didn't work and wasn't accurate, I wouldn't have released it; my reputation is more important than making a few bucks. I built it with reference to my Gossen Starlite II and Spectra Pro IV and have found it to track those meters within 1/3 stop. My beta testers were similarly tasked with ensuring accuracy against their meters (Sekonics, Minoltas, etc.) and reported that it worked fine. As long as you calibrate it properly, it should track your meter perfectly well. But you DO have to calibrate it: iPhone cameras differ, even between two instances of the same model (if you just fire it up uncalibrated, it may read as much as a stop off of the correct value, depending on your individual iDevice).

I welcome independent tests, and if someone finds a real problem, I want to know about it so I can fix it: please contact me directly.

Luxi support for incident metering is in the current version. Support for Lumu is coming; I just got the SDK and a Lumu is enroute for development and testing.

Contact info, and full details on what Cine Meter II can do -- and can't do -- at http://www.adamwilt.com/cinemeterii/index.html.

July 4, 2014 at 3:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Thanks for the reply, Adam!

July 4, 2014 at 4:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Robert Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker's Process
4188

Very cool- thanks for letting us know about the accuracy and testing environment

Do Luxi and/or Lumu work with iPad or Android?

July 6, 2014 at 3:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Adam - I would purchase an Android version for this app. I do not have an iPhone and would much prefer to stay with my current smartphone.

July 6, 2014 at 10:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Morgan Simpson

David: The current Luxi only fits on certain iDevices. They're working on a "Luxi for All" universal clip-on that should fit on almost any smartphone or tablet, even with a case: http://www.esdevices.com/blogs/news/14186337-introducing-luxi-for-all

Lumu plugs into the headphone port and is currently supported on all iOS 6 or higher devices. They have in the past said they were working on Android support but their site does not currently mention it. I don't know if they have decided to drop Androud support or if it's just taking them longer to implement it.

Morgan: I hear you; a lot of people want an Android version. I have two 'droid devices (one on Gingerbread, one on ICS) sitting here specifically for development purposes, but I need to find a solid block of time to do that, which has been very hard to find in the past year. With any luck I'll be able to look into it later this year... but I can't promise anything.

July 6, 2014 at 3:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I appreciate you having it on your radar! I hope you are able to find some time before the end of 2014. The app looks great btw.

July 16, 2014 at 9:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Morgan

Thank you for your reply. To Robert Hardy….. Please continue to post in exactly the same way you have always posted. I'm sick to death of the trolls who frequent websites such as this.
Keep posting and leave it to the readers as to what they do with the info - it's up to them, the cynical twats!

July 10, 2014 at 6:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Iain Philpott

I think light meters in times of digital photography/filming are highly overrated.
Yes, we used to have light meters in those old times where we had to use real film.... and no chance to make a quick test to see if the film ASA and the environment light fits.

But hey! Today, we have raw to compress dynamik in post and live histograms to see it!
Come on, you should learn to use those tool instead of jumping on old school techniques.

July 4, 2014 at 3:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Tom DoP

obviously you don't know what you're talking about... a light meter is an invaluable tool for any cinematographer, even when shooting digital.

July 4, 2014 at 6:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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+1

July 4, 2014 at 6:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mikhail

Sure, I do. Your comment is needless.

You should respect how other guys are doing their work well, even if it doesn't conform your perceptions of the ideal.

July 5, 2014 at 3:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Tom DoP

Please explain to me your technique to accurately calculate key/fill ratios etc with a global raw histogram. I'm not trying to be shitty, I just want to know how to do this without a meter... (also, not everyone shoots raw and even those that do don't shoot raw every time dude).

July 5, 2014 at 5:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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please enlighten all of us on this subject: when scouting for locations do you bring your camera with you?

July 5, 2014 at 6:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Article: Why the light meter is still relevant: http://goo.gl/MkiUkD

July 5, 2014 at 1:50AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Taylor

Thanks for the share / link- much appreciated. :)

July 6, 2014 at 2:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Shame there's no android version...

July 5, 2014 at 6:01AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Not Whinging Ab...

A bargain for $20 and the add on $30 incident meter a no brainer for filmmakers on a budget. Perfect timing for me as I need one for stills and video.

July 5, 2014 at 10:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dan

My Minolta Flashmeter IV cost me $531 in 1989. Though primarily designed for measuring flash exposure for still photographers, the IV has a terrific cine mode that made it popular with DPs back in the day.

The Flashmeter IV is still selling for $175 used today. I pulled mine out of deep storage when I got my D800 and suddenly realized it's like shooting 16mm ECO 7252 film.

If a $30 dome and a $20 app on a calibrated phone can match a good incident light meter, go for it.

My concern would be, how do you know the phone stays calibrated? Under what conditions would the phone lose its calibration and would you know it lost the calibration?

The whole point of an incident light meter is that it is consistent -- a trustworthy standard to achieve proper skin tone exposure shot to shot -- regardless of brightness or darkness of the background.

All that said, my new GH4 has multiple, user-definable zebra settings that warn me of overexposure constantly. The trusty IV is pretty much back in the bag again.

July 5, 2014 at 3:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dan

Good questions!

"how do you know the phone stays calibrated?" There's no definitive answer to this, aside from periodically checking calibration. All I can say is that those iDevices I've tested have stayed consistent to my other meters for 18 months (the longest I've tested 'em so far). I haven't seen *any* noticeable drift over that time.

Put another way, the iPhone camera isn't that much different in its fundamental technology from any other digital camera. How often do your other digital cameras lose their exposure calibration?

"Under what conditions would the phone lose its calibration?" The biggest single issue I've had is schmutz on the lens, which can both diffuse and cut down on the light coming into the iPhone's camera. Diffusion rather spoils the selectivity of the metering angle and light loss gives you incorrect readings.

If you delete and reinstall a light meter app, its calibration is lost and must be re-done.

If you get a new iDevice, even one of the same model, don't assume that the calibration from your old device carries across. I've seen a 2/3 stop variation between two iPhone 5 cameras.

"and would you know it lost the calibration?" Obviously if you start seeing a change in your exposure consistency -- pix getting brighter over time, or darker -- that's an indication you should check calibration again.

A few points to keep in mind generally:

1) Even pricey professional meters can lose calibration over time. Many DPs have their meters routinely recalibrated to be on the safe side... or they notice their exposures changing over time, and send their meters in.

2) Any iPhone based light meter app NEEDS to be calibrated before it's used, both because of variations between camera models and variations within camera models.

3) Don't assume that the calibration in one light meter app carries over to another app on the same device. Different app writers may use different light meter calibration constants, as there are several to choose from (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APEX_system)!

July 5, 2014 at 11:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I picked up a used like new Sekonic 328 to replace the one I had that quit taking readings for $100. real meter. while it doesn't have the reading range of newer meters, its good enough for doing stuff like checking levels on chroma key shoots to get your lights roughed in before camera is up.

I also always use the disc. I hate domes as they average the light out and you can't read contrast between your lights. using a disc will put you in much better control of your lights and you'll be able to really read what your too hot backlight is doing and it looks on camera so that when you rough in lighting, you can meter and have a better idea how its going to look before the camera is up... just like in the days of shooting film when you really needed to know how a stock handled contrast / hi lights and shadow.

other times, when you need to reproduce your lighting weeks or months apart in a location, some simple notes and light meter can make your life easy....

July 6, 2014 at 6:02PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I will start by saying I know Adam personally. He would not have released this app it had not been put through a few real world field tests. I've tested it along side my very old Pentax spot meter, and my not as old Seconic cine-meter and it compares very well. The app offers other quick reference modes that the other meters do not and I find that using a combination of many tools often helps me verify the results I'm giving my clients. I will be teaching a lighting course in the fall at a local Texas university and have added this app as a required tool for the students. Not everyone can buy a 600 dollar meter, however, at 20 bucks this is not even as pricy as the text book I'm requiring for the class. There was a time when I would light a scene by the monitor and still do for most productions, however, with Raw and multiple variations of Log it is always a good idea to dial in a range or safe working zone ( CYA) by using a tool if its available to you. By the way Adam makes no profit off of the clip on dome that cost more than his app.

July 9, 2014 at 11:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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craig

This app looks awesome. Getting it right now!

I previously bought the Luxi and, to be honest, I was legitimately pissed when I received it. It's essentially a small super cheap piece of plastic that feels the same in quality to a $2 tchotchke from a gas station gift shop. It does not clamp to the phone very well. You basically have to hold it on manually. For $30 dollars I was expecting at least a little bit of quality. It really honestly shouldn't be sold for more than $5.

I did some tests witht he Luxi app. Essentially you can get the same effects of the cheap plastic dome, by taping a small white piece of paper over your camera.

Save your money, don't bother with the Luxi.

July 10, 2014 at 5:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Damn it! I forgot to charge the mobile phone , so... today we can'nt work..
How comes anybody can can change a reliable light meter for an App. There are not expensive ones and the battery works long. A light meter is de DP trade mark, inseparabel partner with the contrast loupe. I can't figure out myself in location pulling out a mobile phone from my pocket in location to measure light. All the crew would think I am some kind of nerd.
On porpouse, do they have an Android version?

July 16, 2014 at 6:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Zen-Tao

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July 29, 2014 at 6:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I've just stumbled upon this interesting Android app:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.optivelox.lxmeter

It's a free app that offers an incredibly number of light measurements.

June 16, 2015 at 8:35AM

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