December 6, 2013

Introducing Pomfort ClipHouse: The RAW Processing Software We've Been Waiting For

Pomfort ClipHouseThe flexibility that RAW images provide filmmakers in the post-production process is absolutely astounding. However, in the words of Bret Michaels, "Every rose has its thorn." The thorn, in this case, is the fact that RAW files can make your workflow quite a bit more cumbersome than it ever would be with compressed codecs. Despite Premiere Pro's recent addition of native support for Cinema DNG files, more often than not it still makes more sense to create proxies and use an online/offline workflow. Even though there are  solutions for processing RAW files, many people still feel that RAW is more trouble than it's worth because of the post-production headaches. Well not any more, because Pomfort's highly anticipated RAW processing software, simply called ClipHouse, has now hit the market.

To find the origins of ClipHouse, we have to look back to the fine folks at Digital Bolex. Earlier in the year we covered the inception of the so-called "Digital Bolex Software," the software solution that Joe and Elle were developing with German software company, Pomfort, to accompany the release of their D16 RAW camera. At that point in time, the foundations for ClipHouse were laid out in these early drawings by Joe:

Just yesterday, Pomfort's ClipHouse was released to the public. It's a piece of software that claims to be a one-stop solution for all of your RAW processing needs. It takes an approach similar to Red Giant's BulletProof, where the software is built into separate sections, with each section being used for a separate process (or set of processes) within your post-production workflow. In ClipHouse, these sections are called rooms. Here's what you can accomplish in the four rooms in the software:

  • Copy: Checksum-verified Backup
  • Manage: Native playback and easy clip organization
  • Color: Exposure settings and creative grading on RAW images
  • Export: Creation of ProRes and H.264 movies for editorial

What sets ClipHouse apart from competing products is the fact that the software contains everything you need to work with RAW files. In the past, a good portion of the RAW workflows depended on several different pieces of software, many of which were primitive and uncommunicative with other programs. Beyond the functionality, the interface is about as clean and intuitive as it gets, which stands in stark contrast to the RAW solutions of yesteryear.

Here are just a few of the best uses for ClipHouse:

Playback after shooting

  • Directly play back footage from camera media
  • Inspect your footage for focus and exposure

Color correction and grading

  • Color correct your RAW footage
  • Adjust exposure, white balance and tint
  • Refine your image with sharpness and contrast
  • Apply a creative look with soft contrast and shadows and highlights tint

Preparation for editoral

  • Create QuickTime files (ProRes, H.264)
  • Transcode including all grading information

Backups on set

  • Copy your footage to multiple destinations simultaneously
  • Constantly keep an eye on what you already copied
  • Manage your clips in a central library

Here's a screenshot of the software. Sadly, I didn't have any C-DNG's stored on my computer, so some options are grayed out, but this should give you an idea of how intuitive the software is.

ClipHouse is available for download now from the Pomfort website. There are two options for purchase, a $49 license for one year, or a permanent license for $129. Of course, you can always download a 14-day free trial of the software as well.

What do you guys think of ClipHouse? Will this program help you to consolidate your RAW workflows? If you've been on the fence about RAW, does ClipHouse alleviate some of your concerns about the post-production process? Let us know in the comments!

Link: ClipHouse -- Pomfort

Your Comment

83 Comments

It seems like there are two movements now - Raw-in-One and 100% Bake-In with the in-camera LUT's. They'll probably break down according to the workflow/time constraints.

December 6, 2013 at 6:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

I agree completely. The main motivation between choosing raw or baked-in is the nature of the project.

However, I think there are MANY who choose baked-in when they could afford to shoot raw because the film world has yet to catch up to raw. Photography has been using raw for years and are on top of it. Of course, processing tens-of-thousands of images compared to a few hundred is more difficult, and the filmmaking software is NOT there yet. But, also our individual understanding of raw is not there yet. We need to grow more and learn more, and understanding raw is something we can learn now from our still-photography brothers.

December 6, 2013 at 7:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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finducinema

So how is this different than Davinci Resolve? I'm pretty sure Davinci Resolve 9/10beta Lite can do all of this for free, though nothing past 2k. Can this software handle any resolution? I guess that'd be the main difference I see hear. Unless I am missing something.

December 6, 2013 at 6:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Barret

December 6, 2013 at 7:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Resolve is capable of just about all of the same things to some extent, but having a highly intuitive program like ClipHouse at the top of your workflow will definitely seem preferable to many people, especially if they're more interested in having a simple tool for media management and transcoding, instead of a full color suite.

December 6, 2013 at 7:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4851

Resolve is extremely intuitive... and free... and one less application to learn and clog up your Dock. This app is really nothing special.

December 6, 2013 at 7:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

forgot to mention that Resolve can handle every format... except avchd and p2, but who uses that anyway.

December 6, 2013 at 7:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

Personally, to me Resolve seems like a complete cluster-fuck when it comes to editing color of any image. Especially if, like me, your main tool of color editing is Lightroom, a wonderfully powerful and truly intuitive piece of software, where finesse is the name of the game.

I taught myself FCP, Premiere, Photoshop, and Lightroom just by experimenting, and I'm not certain I could do the same with Resolve. So much of it seems counter intuitive or it's controls seem to make it impossible to attain precision in editing colors. The controls especially, for me, are not equipped to bring out the full potential beauty a raw image can possess. And I think it's because they're still based on the tools that were NEEDED to bully baked-in video into something decent.

December 6, 2013 at 7:48PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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finducinema

Untrue. Resolve was created for cineon before all of that h.264 crap.

December 6, 2013 at 7:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Harry Pray IV

fs 700 avchd

December 6, 2013 at 9:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Darryl

Funny you use the word "finesse". For whatever reason, I'm still keen on using Color Finesse via AE. For whatever reason, I've generally had better luck getting what I want from that vs. Resolve. Maybe it's just a bad habit, but "if it ain't broke- don't fix it" ;)

December 8, 2013 at 4:28AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I still use Apple Color in FCP 7 quite a lot.

December 10, 2013 at 8:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Some people find resolve intuitive, especially people with telecine experience. I myself found it a bit complex for what I wanted to do, and many people have shared that sentiment with me.

December 6, 2013 at 8:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Duuude!! DaVinci Resolve 10 Lite goes 4k :)

December 6, 2013 at 7:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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jesuan

But it only supports Cinema DNG... what about Arri Raw and Red Raw?

... and why do you capitalize each letter in raw? It's not an acronym, ya know.

December 6, 2013 at 6:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

RAW = Raw Acquisition Workflow - Ha, surely we can turn it into an acronym of some sort. :)

December 6, 2013 at 7:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Razor

Actually, why is this? I suppose it's as a result of Red's stylisation of the word RAW.

December 6, 2013 at 7:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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No, it's just ignorance.

It's "raw" or "Raw" if you really want to make it stand out, but never "RAW"

December 6, 2013 at 7:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

Every camera manufacturer writes it capitalized. Why write it differently than the people who make the stuff just because it's not a traditional acronym? I think it's an easy way to distinguish it from when people are referring to raw footage that is straight from the camera. It's a way to capture footage, and not a word, whereas if someone says they posted raw footage online, what are they really talking about? It's less obvious when not capitalized.

December 6, 2013 at 7:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Joe Marine
Camera Department

Joe, your replies always make my day. Whenever the Comments Section BS gets too thick around here you can always be relied upon to ride in and shoot it down. Don't ever put those six-guns away, mate.

December 6, 2013 at 9:13PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Most people write it that way to distinguish it from simply untouched footage.

December 6, 2013 at 7:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Coty

It's a simple way of differentiating between the otherwise indistinct "RAW footage" (unprocessed "digital negative" images) and "raw footage" (unedited footage).

December 6, 2013 at 11:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Pippy

Just for mac users????

December 6, 2013 at 7:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Manuel

Mac only? What the...!

December 6, 2013 at 7:08PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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You voted '-1'.
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Razor

You must be one of the "otha guys"

December 6, 2013 at 7:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jorge

ahahahaaaaahhaa

December 7, 2013 at 5:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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sek

@Jorge - Yeah, I know you weren't talking to me boy.

December 7, 2013 at 7:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Razor

Hey NFS,

Thanks for giving ClipHouse some coverage!
I see a few questions out there about the relevance of this software, so I'll try to address them.
I have been using this version of it for a month now and I gotta say I love it.

Here's why.

#1. It's a robust Data Management as well as a transcoder. Most color correction solutions are not designed to help you manage your data.
#2. The color timing is setup to be extremely fast and simple to use. This means if you are looking to create a "one light" or a ProRes file you will be doing final color correction on at a later stage you will probably get there faster using ClipHouse. If you already have a color correction software you are happy with that's great, but there are many people who are just getting into raw for the first time and the software can be a barrier to entry for them. Even Bloom talks about this.
#3. ClipHouse let's you select the debayering algorithm that fits your project best! This is a big deal. Very few transcoders allow you to select your debayering algorithm, I think the Sony one is the only one I know of.
#4. Custom Export resolutions and crop / size controls. ClipHouse has a function where you can type in the export resolution you would like, and you get to choose how the image get's there, IE it get's cropped or it get's resized, and how it's resized. So yes 4K if you want :)
#5. This software was built on principals / intentions that as far as I can tell no other software has been built to uphold. They are:

- Keep it raw as long as you can.
- Transcode only once.
- Transcode only what you need to transcode.

We believe for many people this will be the most efficient way to work with raw.

I could go on, but these are some major points.

Feel free to ask questions, I'll try to monitor this thread.

December 6, 2013 at 8:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thanks for the reply, Joe!

December 6, 2013 at 9:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4851

You're very welcome :)
Hit me up if you ever need info or files!

December 6, 2013 at 9:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Does it open *.RAW magic lantern files natively? That would be worth $50 as none of the existing solutions are solid (on a pc at least), to convert the files.

December 7, 2013 at 2:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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greg

Yep, it sure does.

December 7, 2013 at 2:35PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4851

Even Bloom?... Sir Phillip? The godfather of modern filmmaking? Are u sure?...who knew...shit got real!! (I like Phillip, it's people who reference him that are funny...)

December 7, 2013 at 8:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Michael

Mac only? Like... why?

December 7, 2013 at 2:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Tiedtke

Hi Joe,

To me, since Resolve does not support my mac mini (though it is the newest one available), this new software is a god-sent. It seems fast and easy. Just what I need two weeks away from shooting a RAW feature film!
But...
So far, it doesn't seem to be able to handle those multiple RAW files that the magic lantern hack on Canon 5D creates when file is above 4.3gb... it just doesnt reckognise it.
That would be an instant put-off if it were the case, do you know if this is so?

Thanks!

December 7, 2013 at 5:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ivan

Hi Ivan,
I haven't tried it with Magic Lantern Raw files, but that may be the case.
You can write to them directly at: info@pomfort.com

December 9, 2013 at 1:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Custom Debayering sounds like a useful option... can you explain a bit how this could affect the results?

December 9, 2013 at 4:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Also if you would like to download some DNG files to play with :)

https://www.copy.com/s/LO17A38v1hETna09/Toby%20Bryan%20Sunset%20Exit%20R...

December 6, 2013 at 8:30PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Joe you remind me of Pirates of the Caribbean :)

December 7, 2013 at 4:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thanks! ... I think ;)

December 9, 2013 at 1:09AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Joel I've decided that my next feature will be shot on a combined D16 and FS700 Sony 2K Raw workflow so I wanted to know that from your experience using this software, and this might sound cheap but... if its a toss up between Resolve and Cliphouse using CI as our cloud service, whats going to get me the fastest raw workflow for D16 footage? Reason I ask is because its going to be a 3 week shoot and two weeks in post before delivery - yes, I know - so time is absolutely crucial here on all levels.

December 7, 2013 at 6:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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shaun wilson

typo - "Joe!"...... its late!

December 7, 2013 at 6:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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shaun wilson

I believe you'll get faster results using ClipHouse. Some testing with your particular system would be best though :)

December 9, 2013 at 1:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ok fantastic, now get those lovely cameras on the market so we can buy them!

December 9, 2013 at 7:42AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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shaun wilson

I've read in the comments that Resolve Lite would do anything this app can do. Can Resolve do checksum verified copies to multiple destinations simultaniously??
I had an eye on this mostly because of the backup features.

December 7, 2013 at 5:54AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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hansd

Exactly :)

And if you're using it on set, this combines like 3 useful tools into one.

December 9, 2013 at 1:12AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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As someone who never used RAW before, I would love it if someone could clarify something about RAW workflow in general:

When I first put the footage from my camera to my editing computer, I understand that I need to correct and change the color of the footage and then make a proxy or something that the editing software can work with, to begin editing.

What happens when I'm done editing? When I want to move my edited project into the GFX department (Maya, After Effects and such). I want to work again on the RAW footage, or is there something else? Because I wouldn't work on a proxy and I would rather wait til the very end to do color grading for my film - but if I need to do that color work before I begin editing, how does this all work?

Thanks.

December 7, 2013 at 7:35AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Not being an editor/DP/colorist/camera operator myself - the idea is that Raw files are large and take a very long time to transfer, eat a lot of CPU/GPU, etc. so they are compressed into a proxy/smaller file, from which they are edited. But grading compressed files results in the various artifacts, such as banding, aliasing, etc. So the idea is to take a Raw file, compress it for convenience/work flow, edit it as a proxy, then time-code it back to Raw for color grading. That way you can have the desired final look without overloading your computer or work station.
.
Arri Amira works the other way ... well, it gives you options but .... you apply a choice of color grading options just after you shoot and transfer essentially files that are ready for editing. Presumably, Amira has enough processing power (the camera runs ~ $30K or more) and quality software not to leave artifacts with its in-camera look, should you desire to tinker with the footage thereafter. The idea is to basically hand over the media card to the editor and be done with it.

December 7, 2013 at 8:47PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

Thanks man.

So basically it's like working with regular proxies, that later should be turned back into their RAW format.

It's interesting that Arri does this differently though, because color grading also happens after inserting CG elements, which happens much later in the post process. Perhaps this is similar to color timing for film?

Either, way, I do like to keep color work as the final stage of the editing process.

December 8, 2013 at 5:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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You can export an Edit Decision List to AE that will allow you to import raw files into your edit.

December 9, 2013 at 1:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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So how will it handle exposure control? Will we finally get rid of that annoying flicker when we ever so slightly adjust these values in Camera Raw / Lightroom (also see: http://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/camera_raw_flicker...)?

Greetings,
Matt

December 7, 2013 at 12:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Anteeru

i had a similar problem when i did a ML raw test on the 5d3 and colour graded in lightroom. I just assumed it was something i did wrong as there are loads of raw videos treated with lightroom on vimeo that look fine. Could also have been due to an old build as that was months ago.
Working with resolve and proxies appears to be the quickest solution, but i really really like LR and would much prefer to use it, at least until im up to speed with resolve.
Here are a couple of videos graded on LR, workflow described and no flicker.
https://vimeo.com/68454276
https://vimeo.com/68636314
Going to do another test, this week and see if things improve... fingers crossed.

December 8, 2013 at 5:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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jojo

Are there any similarly streamlined, RAW-workflow-enhancing programs designed for PC users? Where can I find beginner level tutorials that can help me perform the same tasks this program aims to accomplish using Resolve in conjunction with Premiere Pro?

December 7, 2013 at 3:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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ClipHouse will eventually be available on PC too.

December 9, 2013 at 1:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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it's a good solution for people like me that no have a GPU acceleration so davinci doesn't run , so this is a good way for use Raw

December 7, 2013 at 4:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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luca

i think the next update of fcpx will be able to manage directly dng file and i think they come a big update for color correction , they lost a lot of people for resolve! let see

December 7, 2013 at 4:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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luca

Software is very convenient to use, simple layout. But from what I can tell, it discards the audio track. When I export quicktime files there is no audio. Not that I use in camera audio, but I at least need a guide track when editing and syncing.

Anyone else notice this, or am I missing something?

December 7, 2013 at 4:39PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Steve M

That shouldn't happen. I know for a fact the D16 audio get's put into the exported quicktime.
There is an option when exporting that says "Embed Audio if Available", make sure this is checked on.

December 9, 2013 at 1:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Luca, that's the same reason I downloaded it. Seems to be a common problem for people who upgraded to Mavericks.

December 7, 2013 at 4:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Steve M

The other problem, if I am not mistaken, is that it doesn't understand magic lantern split files, and can't load them - making the software - if this is the case - pointless for magic lantern users.
Hope to be corrected.

December 7, 2013 at 9:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Ivan

Their servers seems to be down now (probably because of this article and everyone downloading it).

But will this work with FS700 RAW CinemaDNG sequences from the Odyssey 7Q recorder? If not, can you guys add that format? Even with the latest Adobe RAW update, FS700 Cinema DNGs have a very off pink color (similar to how it treats 5DIII RAW from ML).

Sounds promising though, especially if it can do a Batch render of sequences for quick proxies to use in NLEs

December 7, 2013 at 10:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Gene Sung

Yes, this does work with the FS700 footage. Tried some today.

December 8, 2013 at 2:02AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Eddie Barton

And the pink is not an issue in ClipHouse because it can go outside of that -150/150 tint range that ACR has.

December 8, 2013 at 2:03AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Eddie Barton

Yeah there is a cool feature where you can type pretty much any number into the ClipHouse slider value and it will try to perform :)

December 9, 2013 at 1:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Hi Gene, I'm from Pomfort's support team. We would be happy to get some sample footage from the Odyssey 7Q recorder to test! If you have time, please contact us at support@pomfort.com so we can arrange the transfer details. Thanks!

December 10, 2013 at 7:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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How about the BMPCC?...Whew

December 8, 2013 at 1:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Anthony Marino

Yup :)

December 9, 2013 at 1:21AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Thanks Joe

December 9, 2013 at 5:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Anthony Marino

What is the point of exporting quicktimes for edit without the audio? Seems like a big oversight of something so simple. Resolve offers an option to sync the audio for export. Why not include this?

December 9, 2013 at 9:24AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Steve M

ClipHouse definitely includes Audio

December 9, 2013 at 9:11PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Resolve does it all for free and its 4k (UHD)

December 9, 2013 at 4:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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john jeffries

Just installed this on my mac doesn't work with canon ML DNG raw files. Worked fine with Toby's DNG files. Will stick with Resolve.

December 10, 2013 at 6:03PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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oj

Why not just import the .raw?

December 10, 2013 at 6:27PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Eddie Barton

That's the first thing I tried, when you add .raw or dng it says "ingesting*. I have tried it with canon 50D ,60D and 600D raw files with the same results.

December 11, 2013 at 3:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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oj

This is for MAC only.

December 12, 2013 at 5:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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They should at least have an unlimited demo version
for free so people can learn and master it.
Then they can decide later if they need/want
to buy it. 2 Weeks is like adobe 1995...It's 2014.

December 12, 2013 at 7:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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sammy

Problem resolved, the only way I can get Cliphouse to open raw and dng files is by right clicking on them in finder and "open with cliphouse". It now works and I actually quite like it. It's very user friendly with very good results, Far more easier to use than Resolve lite.

December 14, 2013 at 2:33AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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oj

Has anyone managed to export proxys with audio from BMPCC ? Can't see any export audio if available option ...

December 17, 2013 at 2:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Pel

Hey, It seems odd but I can't find the export audio tab... money back?

December 20, 2013 at 7:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Tommaso

Cliphouse discards the audio. Making the exports pointless unless you are just looking to see if your footage looks ok. But as far as creating dailies for edit, pointless. Complete waste of time and money if u ask me.

December 30, 2013 at 10:38PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Steve M

Hi Ivan, I'm from Pomfort's support team. ClipHouse 1.0.1 has just been released! Now it's possible to ingest and copy Magic Lantern split files. You can give it a try!

December 19, 2013 at 9:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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I contacted Pomfort and Cliphouse does not handle audio.

December 30, 2013 at 10:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Steve M

No it does not, Joe. Sorry.

December 30, 2013 at 10:36PM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

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Steve M