July 17, 2014

Ben Affleck & Matt Damon Want Your Short Films for the Next Season of 'Project Greenlight'

project greenlightSurely many of us were bummed when we learned that the reality TV show Project Greenlight was being canceled back in 2005. (It seems unfair that audiences would rather keep up with the Kardashians than today's burgeoning cinematic talent, but whatever.) However, you might've heard that the Ben Affleck/Matt Damon-produced series that puts first-time filmmakers head-to-head to compete for a chance to make a feature film is finally back for Season 4, this time on HBO, and are now looking for the next batch of short film submissions.

Here's a good description of what participating in Project Greenlight will be like:

The show begins with a digital competition, and will follow the winner from pre-production and casting through principal photography and post-production. Equipped with a Hollywood-vetted script and surrounded by a team of industry professionals, the fledging director must learn to cope with pressure from the studio and producers, surviving on-set politics and leading a veteran cast and crew, while trying to deliver a viable movie – on schedule and on budget.

The digital contest opens on July 24th, and is asking for first-time directors to submit their short films, which can be on any topic and from any genre, though they can be no less than 1 minute and no more than 3 minutes. You can definitely read more in the PG's FAQ section, but submissions should be free of nudity pornography, and explicit sexual content. (As for language, think PG-13.) The digital contest-winning director will become the star of the show! (Or something like that -- Affleck and Damon show up quite a bit -- let's say "subject of the show".)

Project Greenlight

Here are a few requirements contestants need in order to be considered for Project Greenlight:

  • You must have a Facebook account.
  • You must be 18 or older and be a legal resident of one of the 50 U.S. States or the District of Columbia.
  • You must not be a professional. For purposes of the contest, a “professional” means any individual who, as of July 24th, 2014, (i) is a current member of either the Directors Guild of America or the Screen Actors Guild or (ii) has directed a feature film that was acquired for the purpose of, and subsequently received, paid distribution in any medium.

Submissions open on July 24th and end August 8th. If you want to learn more about submitting to the competition, head on over to PG's FAQ section.

Link: Project Greenlight

[via Mashable]

Your Comment

28 Comments

Good things this guy isn't American (that I know of) otherwise it wouldn't be a very fair competition lol :

https://vimeo.com/82920243

July 17, 2014 at 3:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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CoolHandLuque

Oh hey, that's my film! Thanks CoolHandLuque! No, I'm not american but things have been happening thanks to that short so I might just get to make a feature anyway.
Big fan of Project Greenlight though, hope they make another horror film like in last season.

July 17, 2014 at 5:40PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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dauid

Sure thing David. Congrats on the opportunities that have resulted form your absolutely fantastic short. You've earned it and I definitely look forward to what you do next!

July 17, 2014 at 6:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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CoolHandLuque

Hey David I checked your short out and liked it keep up the good work.

July 25, 2014 at 9:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gary Simmons

Yes!! I watched this during the Bloody Cuts contest. So good.

July 18, 2014 at 7:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Ian

why not other countries!!!!!!???

July 17, 2014 at 3:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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mateo sedano

Cuz 'Murica!!! That's why!

But seriously, for the purposes of this show they are most likely looking for American Filmmakers to feed (more or less) back into the Hollywood system. They will more than likely recoup their costs on season 1 with the film that is made, and anything that comes after will just be gravy to them. (Cuz you can bet whoever gets on this show is going to sign an agreement that states their next (x) number of films will be required to turn over a % of earnings over to HBO)

July 17, 2014 at 4:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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CoolHandLuque

Hey Cool...
You're an idiot. Nobody would sign such an agreement. Sometimes it is best if you let adults talk while you just listen.

July 17, 2014 at 4:43PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Bob

Wow, what a pathetic response. Here's hoping I never have to work with a jackass like you.

July 17, 2014 at 5:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Brian

Actually thats pretty standard for a lot of TV competitions (American Idol, X-Factor, etc) therefore it's not that much of a stretch to believe it would be the case in some way shape or form with Project Greenlight. If anything, the winner will get a first look deal from HBO or whatever else studio helps front the money for the film they make during the show. Either way, there is no way HBO pumps money into this show/film and has it end at just that ... they have to be factoring in the long game somehow.

July 17, 2014 at 5:57PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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CoolHandLuque

America, land of the fee.

July 18, 2014 at 1:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Natt

I'm guessing that it is like most shows where you are competing for prizes - money or otherwise - the IRS is involved in evaluating wether or not they need to tax the earnings, therefore you need to be a US citizen.

July 18, 2014 at 6:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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DirkGently

Wow. Who edited that promo clip? When you notice the cuts and the camera angles, that's a BAD thing.

July 17, 2014 at 4:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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BrainOfMonkey

why not sag :(((

July 17, 2014 at 4:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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ohno!

Very cool. I wish them all the luck in the world with this. Project Greenlight is going to benefit more than just one filmmaker.

July 17, 2014 at 5:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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William

The fine print says that HBO keeps the rights and the copyright to any and all short films entered into the competition, so if you enter something into the contest, make sure you weren't planning on using it, or selling it ever again.

I question the legality of copyright transfer via contest entry. I could understand HBO wanting rights to those films selected as finalists/winners, but it's absurd they're apparently requiring everyone to sign over their copyrights to enter the contest. Not a legal expert, but I don't think copyrights can be transferred legally without some sort of consideration, and the chance of winning a prize is not the same as an option.

(i) grant and assign to HBO a royalty-free, perpetual, non-exclusive, unrestricted, worldwide license in the User Content throughout the world including, without limitation, all copyright, together with all consents (if any) necessary to enable its reproduction, distribution, modification, publishing and/or other exploitation by HBO and/or by any person authorized by HBO, by any means and in all media now known or hereafter devised, in whole or in part, without payment or other reference to you or any other person, and to advertise and promote such exploitation, for the full period of all such rights (together with any extensions and renewals) and insofar as possible in perpetuity;

July 17, 2014 at 6:17PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Tron

The keyword is "non-exclusive" basically just rights to use your material without legal ramifications, you can still sell your media as you wish.

July 17, 2014 at 8:25PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Marshman

Oh Ben, just don't go all french canadian on me, mkay?

July 18, 2014 at 1:32AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Natt

Matt Damon

July 18, 2014 at 3:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Suresh kara

Project Greenlight seasons 1-3 directors exactly done very well. The third season was the strongest in terms of career longevity (the writers worked on SAW sequels, Pacific Rim and the director did all three Feast films and a piranha movie).

They're not looking for the next best filmmaker. They're looking for someone to be good reality show fodder. If you are going to give it a shot, spend the least amount of money on the shorts they will own.

July 19, 2014 at 2:58PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Mitch

LOL 1 to 3 minute shorts.... Give me a fucking break!

July 20, 2014 at 11:04AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Ali

This kind of pissed me off. Nobody in the DGA or SAG? So that cam op who's been working for 5 years trying to move up can't get a shot? Or people who get U5 day playing roles trying to break out with a film of their own? All so they can air creative content for free. Fuck that noise.

July 24, 2014 at 4:42PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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They must have some definition of professional.

July 24, 2014 at 7:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jason

Cam ops aren't generally in SAG or the DGA, so no problem there. Just no professional directors or actors.

July 25, 2014 at 6:50PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Daniel Mimura

There are a lot of working actors and crew who would love to have that kind of exposure that are unknowns. I'm on set right now with 100 SAG extras. The only reason they want non union talent is so they can get away with free content, plain and simple. I expect more from Matt Damon.

July 28, 2014 at 9:59AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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If I submit my short to Greenlight via Facebook, do I lose the rights to my submission to Facebook? Their terms of service agreement reserves certain rights to things posted directly to Facebook.

July 29, 2014 at 3:23AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Fredo

Fredo, I'd keep it off of Facebook. For many reasons. But that's me personally.

I'm certainly no expert, but let me give you my two cents on the issue.

However, if people give you enough information to proceed, be careful in doing so.

I'm not sure how much control Facebook would have if you submitted your idea directly to that site. They may not push it, or they very well could. Either way, it could be a nightmare. Especially if their TOS does control posts and the like.

What I would do, if I were in your shoes, is try to find out contact info of Greenlight and explain to them that you'd rather submit via mail or any other method. But first, I would also have someone representing GL a non-disclosure agreement, so you could retain your rights (or be compensated if those rights were taken from you). I recently typed up a NDA recently, and some of it had to deal with public domain, and how writers could take info from it.

Let's say you accidentally posted your idea to GL on Facebook, but accidentally made that post public (or somehow it became public). A court could maybe see that it was posted on a public website, then sadly adjudicate that another writer, who took your idea and ran with it, was clear to do so because it "was in the public domain". Now this may not happen, but it has enough "what if?" factor for me to think quite heavily about posting it.

Otherwise, I'm not real sure what to tell you. I'm nowhere near professional, nor will I claim to be. But just keep that in mind if and when you get other people giving you the "go-ahead" or other advice.

Best of luck though, Fredo, in whatever you may decide!

July 30, 2014 at 4:43AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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JD

i m from india. i am also interested in your contest. but the problem is your terms. if you have any category for contest plz send me details

August 5, 2014 at 12:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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nilesh ghumare