September 30, 2014

The 240fps Slow Motion Footage & Timelapses from the iPhone 6 Look Great

In spite of the earth-shattering scandal that is "Bend-gate," early adopters of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus have already shot some outstanding footage with the improved cameras on the new devices, most notably some first-person perspective hyperlapses as well as some stunning 240fps slow motion.

https://vimeo.com/106793015

Of the many features added to the iPhone camera in the latest hardware/software update (timelapse and super slow motion being among the most notable and flashy of them), there's one feature in particular that might put the iPhone 6 Plus is a class all its own in terms of video capture. I'm talking of course about optical image stabilization. Lack of stabilization of any kind has always one been one of the biggest issues and dead giveaways smartphone video. Hopefully a well-implemented OIS technology could begin bridging the gap between phones and dedicated cameras, and making smartphone video more palatable.

A recent video from Uncage the Soul Productions shows off all of the new features of the iPhone 6 Pus and then some.

https://vimeo.com/106557317

Here's what they had to say about the footage and the capabilities of the phone in this short video.

Is the iPhone 6+ amazing? YES. Would I bring it to a job shooting for a client? No. It will shoot 240fps, but it degrades and is not what you’d want full size in a polished video. The in-camera stabilizer in the Instagram Hyperlapse app is AMAZING, but it exports final video in 720 not 1080. Timelapse looks great when the conditions are stable, but changing light has the phone struggling to smoothly change exposures following the light.

Nature footage is all well and good, but how does a wine pour look at 240fps, you ask? The folks at Osbourne Images have you covered.

https://vimeo.com/106788484

And a little bit of footage from the Apple folks themselves:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGilvHv0_bE

As much as I'm not fond of the idea of using a phone as a primary camera for making films (unless there really is no other option), it's getting harder and harder to deny that the technology has progressed to a point where many phones are more capable image capture devices than the professional digital cameras of 10 years ago. When combined with apps that ostensibly make the most of those hardware advances, like the hotly-debated $1,000 4K video app Vizzywig 4K, it's clear that smartphone filmmaking is not a passing fad, as many have claimed, but instead an extension of the democratization of filmmaking technology that was spurred by cameras like the Panasonic HVX and the DSRLs that would follow.

As much as we may not like it, smartphone filmmaking is here to stay. The technology will continue to progress and the image quality will continue to inch closer to the cameras that we consider suitable for professional video production work.     

Your Comment

17 Comments

Impressive! I think it is a two-way road for us professionals. While it might turn handy to have the possibility of shooting quality images right in your pocket, customers will think twice before purchasing services from the audiovisual industry, since now more than ever they can do it themselves.

September 30, 2014 at 5:45PM

0
Reply
avatar
Rebecca Pelagio
film student
247

I dunno... It could end up being a good thing. I think customers will try to make something look awesome on an iphone and wonder why it doesn't look nearly as awesome as the videos here. Then they'll look up what they need to do to approach this (learn about light and composition) and see how much time/work that is.

They'll either say "fuck it" and call you or me to do it, or they'll not really care and reveal themselves to be the type of customer who only cared about "good enough" to begin with.

Or maybe I'm wrong and the bar will be lowered as far as what is acceptable video...

September 30, 2014 at 6:07PM, Edited September 30, 6:07PM

2
Reply
avatar
Fahnon Bennett
Director/DP
165

But it could used as a storyboard to show the video pro what we are looking for. You can then offer suggestions, bring in proper lighting, talent, audio, and animations. I think this will shorten the total time to finished video with much less stress.

September 30, 2014 at 11:51PM

4
Reply

Right, Steven. I see this as a helluva pre-viz tool for us (most of my director's treatments for spots include at least rough animations these days), and then you bring in the big guns to make it happen. My only beef with the new iPhones- apparently the only one that offers OIS is the "too big to fit in my skinny jeans' pockets" version. Sigh. It's going in my messenger bag, tho!

October 1, 2014 at 10:49AM, Edited October 1, 10:49AM

0
Reply
avatar
Patrick Ortman
I tell stories. Sometimes for money. Sometimes, not.
480

¡Wowwwwww! Ir's incredible... it's shoot with a phone ()I know it's not perfect but 5 years ago this was cience fiction.

September 30, 2014 at 5:46PM, Edited September 30, 5:46PM

12
Reply
avatar
Ragüel Cremades
Film producer and director
7641

Anyone else see the Twixtor-like distortion on the wine glass video. Distinctly from :04-:09 in the lower left part of the glass. It that done in camera? Is it really slowmo or just an Apple-Twixtor effect?

September 30, 2014 at 6:00PM, Edited September 30, 6:00PM

0
Reply

I don't think I see what you're talking about. It just looks like the glass wobbles a bit from the force of the wine.

September 30, 2014 at 6:12PM

0
Reply
avatar
David S.
2965

Am I the only one in disagree with this? This is just making it harder for film makers, all this tools are getting in hands of everyone now.... Slow-mo is not going to be something "unique" anymore, it's gonna lose all it's value soon...

September 30, 2014 at 6:21PM

0
Reply
avatar
Tommy Plesky
Director / D.P / Editor
1953

The fact that a customer can do this with a phone will definitively feed the ‘good enough’ and consumer market, but that’s about it.

I think serious clients know the difference between a cinema camera and a phone in regards to the look and style of high-frame rate footage and will never compromise or change their standards to go shoot with a phone.

Yes it is 240fps, but there are too many restrictions when working with these files because it was intended for the consumer market.

Why should we feel threatened as filmmakers? We know what really gives a high-end cinematic look (lens choice, depth of field, latitude, color space, quality of sensor, processor, and the list is long and expensive...). Professionally speaking, only the low-end client will satisfy with iPhone quality footage, and that’s not the people we’re catering to, right?

The way I see it, this is a great feature to play around in day-to-day life. That’s how our video was intended. On the fly! Fun and powerful technology readily available will get people inspired and some may capitalize on it, and some will not even know how to use or manage.

At the end of the day it’s just a buzz and another piece of technology that will soon be outdated.

September 30, 2014 at 7:49PM, Edited September 30, 7:49PM

7
Reply
avatar
Carlos Vargas
Producer / Director / Cinematographer
90

Agreed.

September 30, 2014 at 9:43PM

0
Reply
avatar
Kevin Greene
Editor
792

Couldn't have said it better.

October 1, 2014 at 9:32AM

0
Reply
avatar
Francis Tejada
Director/D.P/Editor
74

some of the slowmotion looks like they used the twixtor effect.

September 30, 2014 at 9:44PM, Edited September 30, 9:44PM

2
Reply
avatar
PinZ
Director / Writer / Producer
234

okay, here goes... for high FPS: GoPro Hero4 or Apple iPhone 6 ?

October 1, 2014 at 9:07AM

0
Reply
avatar
Marcel Heemskerk
Independent Film Maker
67

Impressive, but I don't think I would use this slow-mo with my DSLR footage. Going to make some badass Instagram posts though.

October 8, 2014 at 10:14AM

0
Reply
avatar
Dre Kahmeyer
Director
319

I am super impressed with the slow motion feature on my 6 plus. Here's some sample footage: http://youtu.be/tZgQUobLqpE

October 23, 2014 at 1:42AM, Edited October 23, 1:42AM

0
Reply
Steve
74

Butterflies in a mating dance, shot in one take with an iPhone 6 at 240FPS.
Edited in FCPX.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auqjQZFkokg

November 9, 2014 at 8:43PM

14
Reply
Robert Zusman
Enthusiast
74

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WX__lGV6-BY

iPhone camera has an incredible feature – filming at the 240 fps rate, which means everyone with iPhone 6 can shoot such amazing slow motion videos. Looks cool, right? ;)

November 25, 2014 at 12:03PM

0
Reply
Matas
74

Here's a short piece I shot with my iPhone6.
Winter Dogs - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2czJDj0RAiQ
Enjoy!

December 8, 2014 at 2:31PM, Edited December 8, 2:31PM

0
Reply