New Amimon Connex Promises Latency-Free 1080p Wireless Video Up to 3,300 Feet

While you may not have heard of them, Amimon actually makes the chipsets that power many of the wireless video solutions out there. Now they've got a new wireless HDMI solution called Connex that claims line of sight 1080p 60fps video at up to one kilometer (3300 feet) essentially latency-free.

Here is a look at the specs:

  • Distance (Outdoor): Up to 3,300ft./1,000m (LOS)
  • Transmission Delay: Zero (Less than 1mS)
  • Radio Frequency: 5.1-5.8 GHz
  • Channel Selection: Automatic frequency selection (AFS)
  • Video Formats: 1080p/60, 1080p/50, 1080i/60, 1080i/50, 1080p/30, 1080p/24, 720p/60, 720p/50, 525i/60, 625i/50
  • Multicast Mode: Up to 4 receivers with no delay or qualtiy degradation (Requires extra ground unit/s)
  • OSD Support: MAVLINK Telemetry Based
  • Encryption: AES-128 & RSA 1024 for key exchange
  • Operating Temperature: 0-45 Celsius
  • Regulations: CE, FCC, MIC
  • Availability: April 2015
  • Price: Starting at $1,600 (includes transmitter/receiver)

And a closer look at the difference between the air and ground parts of the Connex system:

Amimon Connex Specs

Obviously when obstacles come into play, the range changes dramatically, so I would be interested in knowing how far you can still transmit when there is a forest or a hill between you and your UAV. While it is HDMI only, you can always convert with inexpensive converters if you need to on either end (though that's another thing to power and mount). At $1,600, this looks like an affordable solution for solid range compared to some other products out there. 

It's available for pre-order right now, but you can find out where to buy them in your area here. We'll hopefully see this thing in action at NAB, but in the meantime, head on over to the Amimon website to read more about it.     

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Your Comment

14 Comments

Are they serious with the audio jungle...

April 5, 2015 at 5:00PM

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Luftar Von Rama
Producer / Film Editor
102

man that's gold!

April 5, 2015 at 6:09PM

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matt
829

Wondering if anyone could give me advice.

I've got a fairly specific setup in mind -- would love to be able to mount a wireless HDMI video transmitter on a DSLR on a Steadicam Merlin.

So, say you want to used an Amimon Connex with this setup. What are your options in terms of powering the transmitter? I mean, do you need an external battery (which might make steadicam balance tricky), or is there a way to draw power from the camera? Do many cameras have DC output jacks anyway (or, if they don't, is there any way to adapt them so that they do?)

April 5, 2015 at 8:51PM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
1114

Most ENG and cinema cameras can provide power for accessories.

Do you need a $1600+ system to transmit your video signal 3000 feet? This system is designed for UAV applications, where range is important.

There are other systems, like Paralinx Arrow and Nyrus (see article link above), which have decent range for much less money. Every system requires power at the transmitter and at the receiver. So, yes, you'll have to contend with the weight of the transmitter and the weight of its battery.

April 6, 2015 at 12:56AM

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Charlie K
1300

Really valuable advice. Thanks Charlie!

April 6, 2015 at 9:35AM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
1114

Paralinx arrow's range is a joke---my own body blocks the signal sometimes. I have one and need something better. If this thing works, it looks like it's about a third or half of the price of the ones with more range. While many camera have battery power, he's talking about a Steadicam merlin for D-SLR's, so I don't think he's gonna power it off of the camera. It's interrsting that he's thinking about a wireless transmitter for a device that costs four times more than the device he'd be buying it for.

April 6, 2015 at 11:40AM

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Daniel Mimura
DP, cam op, steadicam op
2316

This was a reply to Charlie K who was replying to Adrian Tan, but it didn't indent and show it there.

April 6, 2015 at 11:41AM

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Daniel Mimura
DP, cam op, steadicam op
2316

Well, my DSLR costs more than an Amimon. But you've got a point: if you had a budget of $2500, are you better off spending that on a camera, or on a transmitter plus $500 DSLR? Would the camera option always get you the better results?

April 6, 2015 at 7:34PM, Edited April 6, 7:34PM

3
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Adrian Tan
Videographer
1114

I ask myself variations of that question almost every day. unless you do a lot of steadicam/gimbal/handheld (where other people need to see it---and most people don't need to see it, most people just *think* they need to), I'd spend it on the camera.

April 9, 2015 at 7:15PM

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Daniel Mimura
DP, cam op, steadicam op
2316

I'm for real supposed to trust a company that won't even pay their own music licensing?

April 5, 2015 at 8:53PM, Edited April 5, 8:53PM

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Amimon Connex looks very promising for UAV purposes. Other solutions like Tomahaw, Bolt Pro, transmits uncompressed data and that's why they are a bit expensive. For live broadcasting purposes, these solutions will still be better.

Amimon Connex has some disadvantages over Tomahawk/ Bolt Pro 2000 / Amimon Skylink:

* No uncompressed data (bad for live broadcasting and also not good for wireless video recording)
* Only one output on the ground station unit. You need to multiply the video source if you need an extra one or two outs for directors' monitor.
* If you need DFS for regulations, Connex doesn't support this.
* Mini HDMI on air unit. Come on! Why not full sized HDMI?

April 6, 2015 at 4:40AM, Edited April 6, 4:40AM

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ozkan erden
Aerial Videographer
166

According to their website, the signal is uncompressed 1080p60. That would be on par with their chip currently used in the parallynx or the nyrius, that stream uncompressed 4:2:2 without latency. It can also stream to multiple receivers, alleviating the one output only on ground station (although you'd need to get more ground station). One can also simply split the output signal...

April 6, 2015 at 10:08AM

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Ariel Levesque
Director
135

"I would be interested in knowing how far you can still transmit when there is a forest or a hill between you and your UAV."

I was told by someone who knows radio stuff better than I do, that trying to transmit a signal behind a hill or a big obstacle, basically violates the Fresnel zone. Specially on the high frequency used here 2.4GHz. The lower the frequency the better penetration the signal has through objects, but that means that if a manufacturer uses anything less than 2.4GHz they may have to clarify that users will have to get a ham or radio license, so that's probably why most HD downlinks only use 2.4GHz for simplicity sake. Since there's no need for a ham license on this frequency.

I would say you could probably upgrade the antennas to high dBI ones and expand your range considerably. Using maybe a yaggi antenna or a patch. Readymaderc and others sell high gain antennas that should with range and RF noise with these devices.

The price is good.

Thanks for the article Joe

April 7, 2015 at 12:48AM

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J. Fandino
Drone sales at www.providentialsystems.com
163

I want this for our s900. looks sick

April 7, 2015 at 8:03AM

4
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Kyle Lamar
Director Producer DP
1189