May 6, 2015

Konova Just Solved the Irritating Issue with Mounting a Long Slider on a Single Tripod

Konova Tripod Stability Arm for Sliders
It's an issue as old as time itself -- alright fine, maybe not that old.

You've got a lengthy slider, say 42 inches, and you only have a single tripod to mount it to. You slide your camera out to the end of the rail, and your heart (and camera) sinks. Sure enough, the slider is flexing downward, messing up your horizons and ruining your shots. You shake your fist at the air, cursing the gear gods, before giving up filmmaking forever. 

Not so fast, disheartened hypothetical filmmaking person! Konova's newest product might just save your ass and help you achieve your hypothetical filmmaking dreams. Meet the Tripod Stability Arm:

It's a relatively simple solution -- simple enough that it would probably be possible to build your own -- but it's also a solution that is versatile, easy to set up, and adaptable to not only Konova's sliders, but any slider with 1/4-20 or 3/8 mounting options at the head and tail. From the video, it seems like one arm will stabilize both ends of the slider, but it seems like the best stability would come from having separate stability arms at each end. Ultimately, these seem like a great solution not only for people with a single set of sticks to mount their sliders, but also filmmakers who travel extensively and want to lighten their load. If these arms work as advertised, they might just eliminate the need for bulkier support options.

Though not available on B&H, you can pick up a Tripod Stability Arm directly from Konova through sites like Amazon and eBay, although each arm will set you back $90.     

Your Comment

38 Comments

Has no one around here heard of a monopod? Even cheaper and useful for more than holding a slider up.

May 6, 2015 at 5:53PM

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Chuck McDowell
1st AC
492

Except a monopod does not "grab" the ground to also help for balance when you get to the oposite side. Many monopods facing straigth are also a pain when trying to do a move down or up.

And when you shoot in delicate remote spots like I do, the less ground surface requirement, the better. Should I mention that a quality monopod is actually no cheaper than this?

I'm definitely going to get one of those if the build quality is good.

May 6, 2015 at 6:39PM

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Haroun Souirji
Director / DP and Producer
373

Hopefully the build quality is similar to the slider. I have the slider and it is solid.

May 6, 2015 at 7:09PM

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Walter Wallace
Spokesperson/Entrepreneur
1151

I wouldn't trust a monopod with no hands supporting it, even if its supported by the slider, it wouldn't be steady. This uses the support of the tripod, three legs are better than one. Looks like a great product and id definitely find it useful especially in portability -not having to pack two tripods.

May 6, 2015 at 6:40PM

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Stephen Herron
Writer/Director
1528

Thanks for the monopod trick Chuck. Just experimented with it, and it worked like a charm. Doesn't help with the other end of the slider, unless you have two monopods, but it's better than nothing.

May 6, 2015 at 7:49PM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
875

Mount your main tripod all the way to one side and the monopod at the complete other end leaving the slider unsupported in the middle. No need for 3 attachment points.

If it sags in the middle, bring the two closer together.

August 11, 2015 at 10:09PM

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Well, It was actually first solved by me more than 1 year ago.. Its a terrible feeling to be copied.. Especially if you love what you are doing and carrying your project in your heart. Well, I guess that is life. You can see our old Kickstarter project where is featured, between 2:40-3:20 in the intro video.. the new telescopic version of it is available now at www.wood-compslider.com (look for Telescopic Magnetic Side Support) https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/644663809/extralite-g2-camera-slide...

May 6, 2015 at 6:40PM

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Adrian Mahovics
Videographer, Maker of Camera Sliders
227

Yeah. You do have one. Cool. It's like one of many products in that one kickstarter package. So make your one gizmo (it's a great idea) and sell yours. Looks like their ball/socket solution is a significant (and important) part of their design.

May 6, 2015 at 7:42PM

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Erik Stenbakken
Videographer & Photographer
355

Hey Adrian, sorry to hear about the copy. Would be interested to know if you see any differences between your product and Konova's. For instance, Konova's seems to require mounting holes on the slider to attach the support arm. What about yours? The prices of each product seem to be about the same otherwise, if yours is about 60 pounds and Konova's about US$90.

May 6, 2015 at 8:09PM, Edited May 6, 8:09PM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
875

Well, you always need mounting holes at the bottom of the slider, but most has one or more.. Mine is magnetic telescopic solution. On top it connects to a chrome-metal ball which has a threaded 1/4-20 connector which connects to the end of the slider.. On the bottom, the same ball fixed on a carbon base plate which is connected to one leg of your tripod by velcro. Just a simple clean solution.

May 7, 2015 at 4:37PM, Edited May 7, 4:43PM

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Adrian Mahovics
Videographer, Maker of Camera Sliders
227

Wow, that is a copy. Great idea also. Both are very useful.

May 6, 2015 at 11:39PM

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sorry to hear, my friend. learn from it and patent your ideas the next time. its costs quite a bit to do so, but if you truly believe your idea is great and orignal, you should go for it.

and businesswise: now would be a great time to put your stability arm on sale! at 50 bucks id get one :)

May 7, 2015 at 12:46PM, Edited May 7, 12:46PM

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Paul-Louis Pietz Pröve
director / dop / editor
562

heheheh.. I like your humor. :) For this I give you one Telescopic Magnetic Side Support for 50 bucks! :) Drop me a private email from my website. www.wood-compslider.com Regarding to the "Patent" you are totally right, but when you are a start up, most times you are limited with founding.. That is the reality.. Have a nice day.

May 7, 2015 at 4:42PM, Edited May 7, 4:45PM

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Adrian Mahovics
Videographer, Maker of Camera Sliders
227

The very LAST shot in the video...there's clearly still flex with the slider, comparable to the beginning examples. You can see why they put the fade out during that moment. So I don't know how effective this tool really is... :/

May 6, 2015 at 6:41PM, Edited May 6, 6:41PM

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Samuel Neff
DP / Editor
859

Haha true ..... guess a monopod might after all do a better job than this :)

May 6, 2015 at 7:24PM

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Hahahaha, keen observation,
Made the entire ad pointless

May 6, 2015 at 7:30PM

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That's a good point! Looks like it isn't rock solid, and I also suspect it matters how you position the Konova support. Looks like it's more diagonal in the final shot, whereas it's more straight down in some of the earlier shots.

Two quick thoughts:

-- I think, in general, where the flex is occurring can vary. It might be in the baseplate, might be the whole head, might be the whole tripod. So, if you have the wobble problem, it can help to try to isolate where it's happening. In some situations, you might be able to remove the head and attach slider directly to legs for better stability. In others, replace the head with something stronger or with a wider base for the slider.

-- I think it does help, where possible, to have the tripod set up such that the legs are spread as far apart as the slider is long, but obviously this is a problem for longer sliders.

May 6, 2015 at 7:33PM, Edited May 6, 7:34PM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
875

Whoops! Yeah. Definite flex there. Odd since the other parts seem solid. Wonder how this would work on the Edelkrone V2 sliders? (that's a *joke* folks!)

May 6, 2015 at 7:45PM

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Erik Stenbakken
Videographer & Photographer
355

I wonder if I could make this work with my rhino slider.

May 6, 2015 at 7:39PM

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Caleb Rasak
Camera Operator / AC
273

Should definitely work. The Rhino I have has 1/4-20 and 3/8 mounting holes at both ends of the slider.

May 6, 2015 at 9:06PM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4803

Niiiiiice. I've been thinking about a relatively similar option for years but never bothered to put it into action. Glad they did. Simple solution, but it's a big help.

May 6, 2015 at 9:41PM

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Ben Howling
Writer / Director
593

I have used the Manfrotto Magic Arm like this for awhile now. Works a treat and also doubles as a flexible camera mount.

May 6, 2015 at 10:46PM

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George Loch
Director
81

Great tip. Thanks!

May 7, 2015 at 3:15AM

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Adrian Tan
Videographer
875

Here's mine using a similar Manfrotto Magic Arm. Great tip George. https://www.flickr.com/photos/geauxmuse/17398708266/

May 8, 2015 at 9:36AM

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John Muse
Owner/Creative Director
81

Wow! So simple and obvious. I just gaffed a shoot and the DP/operator just had a small slider, and I was just thinking, damn, well, you get what you paid for, you should've rented a Dana dolly or paid more for something beefy... But I could've fixed it with a cardellini or mafers and a c-stand arm. I don't want to turn into that old inflexible curmudgeon. You gotta wrk with what you have.

May 17, 2015 at 12:08AM

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Daniel Mimura
DP, cam op, steadicam op
2120

As cool as this looks, I still can't trust it on my 15 dlls sucky, light tripods... I'd rather just carry with both of them than buying more gear :p

May 7, 2015 at 3:03AM

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Charlotte Medina
Director / Producer
88

This was my solution. For heavy cameras I put sticks in the middle and a pair of lightweight stands on the ends. https://youtu.be/JyHDAyeKwyg?t=208

May 7, 2015 at 8:29AM, Edited May 7, 8:29AM

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Andrew Dean
Lighting/Grip
201

Haha! Loved your video. You are hilarious man! Do standup?

May 18, 2015 at 12:47AM

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GeoRover
Aspiring DoP
141

A monopod is practically useless in this way... I have tried it a couple of times but it always moves in some stupid way because of that fact that it does not grip the floor.

Also tried it with a really cheap tripod and it didn't help much either...

May 7, 2015 at 11:23AM

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Viktor Ragnemar
Director/Cinematographer
1236

Just buy a Magic arm, super clamp, and camera platform.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/42197541@N03/8525058662/

May 7, 2015 at 12:15PM

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Interesting. I just bought a 47" slider and this issue is something i just put two light stand on either side to fix. This would make the set up a lot nicer.

May 7, 2015 at 12:35PM

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Josh Spicer
Director, Cinematographer
74

Doesn't anyone just use c stands, magic clamps, and baby pins with 1/4" for this? It's all already on set.

May 7, 2015 at 7:00PM

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Jon Kline
Director of Photography
242

I think I prefer 2 lightweight manfrotto light stands that clip together. You can leave your tripod setup to quickly swap back and forth.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/636420-REG/Manfrotto_1004BAC_3_100...

May 7, 2015 at 10:07PM

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matt
880

Funny that it took so long. I was doing it with DIY extendable leg and set of super clamps for a few years now.

May 8, 2015 at 4:50AM

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Vladimir Pcholkin
BeekeeperStories
333

As an owner of this Konova stabilizing bar, I can only say it's terrific. I use a single one on both my Konova K5-80 and our Kessler Cineslider.

We had the heavy Cineslider on a Sachtler tripod and no matter what, the move sagged and jiggled at the end. I tried jamming a light stand under one end. Couple of things wrong with this: the stand is probably too tall and it doesn't actually attach to the slider, just pushes up in a vain attempt to hold it. Then there's the problem of even small location adjustments. Moving two pods or a pod/lightstand combo is a royal pain. And tripod legs are everywhere.

This simple stabilizer bar creates a very strong triangle structure. As it's one with the tripod, it's easy to move and completely out of the way.

Features:
1. The attachment (upper) end has a 1/4-20 screw with large red knurled knob and an unthreaded post that slips into the 3/8-16 threaded socket. The post is in a slot so it adjusts relative to the 1/4-20 screw. So, it really only attaches to sliders that have 1/4-20 holes at the ends. Most sliders seem to have both a 3/8-16 and a 1/4-20 threaded hole, usually within an inch of each other, at both ends and the middle. This arm is designed to attach so the plate cannot rotate. Easier to see than explain. But well engineered.

2. Rubberized ball joints are at both ends of the arm. This allows you to tilt and even pan the main tripod's head a bit without torquing the arm.

3. The arm telescopes for optimum positioning.

4. The tripod leg clamp at the bottom opens to at least 1-1/2" -- I have not found a tripod it cannot grip. Works fine on all our Sachtlers and my carbon Manfrotto with 75mm 504HD head. The Manfrotto is a very lightweight tripod and head holding up the K5-80cm Konova. The stabilizer arm makes it completely solid. I also have the MasterPan accessory kit and the marvelous Nitsan 2kg Flywheel smoothenizer attached. ( http://konovaphoto.com/best-selling/nitsan-fly-wheel.html ) Having a 2kg hunk of rotating iron on one end can really throw the rig out of balance. The stabilizer arm holds the weight up.

5. Toolless design is compact and travels easily in the case with the slider so I don't forget it.

If you want to rig something up, go for it. I can attest that Konova has done the engineering right. It's a perfect piece of gear.

May 8, 2015 at 6:38PM

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Bogen Magic arm with Super Clamp will do the same thing and locks to Tripod. Also can use for other stuff too!

May 11, 2015 at 4:09PM

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Justin Miller
Director/DP/Editor
350

If you read all the comments, you might have seen that Adrian (the guy who built something like this a year ago) offered me one of these magic arms with a little discount.

i got it today, just tried it and wanted to report: its insanely good. im not sure if this needs to be said, but im obviously not getting anything in return for typing this. if it had turned out to be crap, id say so as i love to criticise, but it really is remarkable.

i have a 40" slider which is simply unusable without the support of another tripod or (what i use most) a monopod. it works but its a little annoying to setup and deal with. i believe many people can relate. the magic support arm from Adrian really does take all of this away, just as i hoped but honestly didnt expect.

it is extremely small and light. its so light it almost feels cheap, but its sturdy as f**k because its made out of carbon fibre. you can adjust the length by simply pulling it out and twisting. super fast and easy. definitely the first advantage over the Konova with a regular locking pin (which i havent tried yet to be honest)

so do you need 2 of them for each of the sides? absolutely not! if your silder doesnt bend then there really is no need for a second unit, both sides are (surprisingly) similarly stable.

Adrians magic arm attaches to two ball joints using magnets, which makes it very very fast to setup. id say the additional setup time for using the support arm is 5 seconds. simply because i can leave the ball joints attached to the slider and tripod. the rest is just: click, twist, pull, twist, click. and surprisingly: its stable. some here mentioned that the konova must be superior because of the upper ball bearing. well this thing has two of them on the lower and upper side.

My recommendation? well as i said, i havent used the konova, but from what ive experienced in my own hands and seen in the video above, id say the wood comp support arm is better in every aspect i can imagine. so if you live in europe, its a no brainer to get Adrians magic arm, as its even cheaper. from the states im not sure how much youll pay for shipping, but id say the possible extra is well worth it.

May 19, 2015 at 12:58PM, Edited May 19, 1:01PM

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Paul-Louis Pietz Pröve
director / dop / editor
562

Loved the writing here. I really felt like you were talking to me. Funny.

October 19, 2016 at 2:40PM

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