Welcome to the Hollywood glossary of terms! Hollywood is one of the most influential and well-known entertainment industries in the world, and with that comes a unique set of terms and phrases.

This glossary is designed to provide an extensive and comprehensive list of terminology used in the film and television industries, from pre-production to post-production and everything in between.


Whether you are an aspiring filmmaker, actor, or simply a fan of movies and TV shows, this glossary will help you better understand the language of Hollywood and the inner workings of the industry.

From common terms like "actor" and "script" to more specialized phrases like "gaffer" and "tracking shot", this glossary is a valuable resource for anyone looking to deepen their understanding of Hollywood's language and culture.

So sit back, relax, and immerse yourself in the fascinating world of Hollywood terminology.

A glossary of every Hollywood term you need to know.'Nope'Credit: Universal Pictures

A Glossary of Over 300+ Hollywood Terms You Need to Know 

  1. A-list: A group of top-tier actors and filmmakers who are considered the most bankable and influential in the industry.
  2. Above-the-line: Refers to key creative personnel, such as writers, directors, and producers, who are responsible for the creative direction of a film or television show.
  3. Academy: Short for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the organization that hosts the Academy Awards (also known as the Oscars).
  4. Action: A command given by a director to start filming a scene.
  5. Agent: A representative who negotiates contracts and job opportunities for actors, directors, and other talent.
  6. Art Director: The person responsible for the overall look of a production, including sets, costumes, and props.
  7. Backlot: A large outdoor area on a studio lot used for filming exterior scenes.
  8. Best boy: The lead electrician on a film or television production.
  9. B-roll: Supplementary footage that is used to visually support the main footage in a film or television show.
  10. Blockbuster: A highly successful and popular film that generates significant revenue.
  11. Box office: The amount of money earned by a film during its theatrical release.
  12. Breakdown: A detailed description of the characters and roles needed for a film or television production.
  13. Bump: An increase in an actor's salary for a project.
  14. Call sheet: A schedule of the day's shooting, including which actors are needed and when.
  15. Camera operator: The person who physically operates the camera during filming.
  16. Casting: The process of selecting actors for roles in a film or television show.
  17. Character actor: An actor who specializes in playing supporting roles, often with distinctive or unusual appearances.
  18. CGI: Computer-generated imagery, used to create special effects in films and television shows.
  19. Cinematographer: The person responsible for the visual look of a film or television show.
  20. Clapperboard: A tool used to synchronize sound and picture during filming.
  21. Close-up:A shot that focuses on a character's face or a specific detail.
  22. Co-star: An actor who shares equal billing with another actor in a film or television show.
  23. Coverage: Additional shots taken during filming that allow for editing and scene construction.
  24. Craft service: The provision of food and drink for cast and crew during filming.
  25. Dailies: Rough cuts of the footage shot during a day's filming.
  26. Day player: An actor who is hired for a single day of work on a film or television show.
  27. Director: The person responsible for overseeing the creative direction of a film or television show.
  28. Distribution: The process of getting a finished film or television show to audiences through theaters, streaming services, or other channels.
  29. Dolly: A platform on wheels used to move the camera during filming.
  30. Double: A stand-in used to replace an actor during a dangerous or difficult stunt.
  31. Editor: The person responsible for piecing together the footage shot during filming to create a cohesive final product.
  32. EPK: An electronic press kit used to promote a film or television show.
  33. Extra: A background actor used to fill out a scene.
  34. Eye-line: The direction in which an actor looks during a scene.
  35. Feature: A full-length film, typically lasting 90 minutes or more.
  36. Film: A motion picture created by projecting a series of still images in rapid succession.
  37. Film stock: The physical material on which a film is recorded.
  38. Film festival: An event where films are screened and showcased to an audience.
  39. Film noir: A genre of film characterized by its use of shadows, darkness, and cynicism.
  40. Final cut: The final version of a film that has been approved for release.
  41. Foley artist: A sound effects editor who creates and records sound effects in a studio.
  42. Footage: The raw, unedited material filmed during a production.
  43. Forced perspective: A technique used to create the illusion of depth and distance in a scene.
  44. Frame: A single still image in a film.
  45. Framing: The way in which a shot is composed and framed.
  46. Freezing the frame: Pausing a film on a single frame to create a still image.
  47. Front office: The executives and decision-makers in a film studio or production company.
  48. Full shot: A shot that shows the entire subject from head to toe.
  49. F/X: Short for "special effects," used to create visual or audio illusions in a film.
  50. F/X supervisor:The person responsible for overseeing the special effects in a film.
  51. Gaffer: The chief electrician on a film or television production.
  52. Genre: A category or type of film, such as comedy, drama, or action.
  53. Green screen: A technique used to superimpose a subject onto a different background by filming against a green screen and later replacing the green with another image.
  54. Grip: A member of the film crew who is responsible for moving and setting up equipment and props on set.
  55. Gross: The total amount of money earned by a film during its entire theatrical run.
  56. Group audition: An audition where multiple actors audition for a role at the same time.
  57. Green screen: A technique used to superimpose a subject onto a different background by filming against a green screen and later replacing the green with another image.
  58. Grip: A member of the film crew who is responsible for moving and setting up equipment and props on set.
  59. Gross: The total amount of money earned by a film during its entire theatrical run.
  60. Group audition: An audition where multiple actors audition for a role at the same time.
  61. Hair and makeup: The department responsible for styling actors' hair and applying their makeup.
  62. Hard light: A type of lighting that creates sharp, defined shadows.
  63. Headshot: A photograph of an actor used for auditions and casting.
  64. High concept: A film or TV show with a simple, easily understandable premise that can be marketed easily.
  65. Holding deal: A contract that guarantees an actor or writer a certain amount of money for a set period of time.
  66. Hollywood ending: A happy, optimistic ending that resolves all conflicts in a film or TV show.
  67. Hook: A memorable, attention-grabbing element in a film or TV show that draws in the audience.
  68. Hot set: A set that is currently in use and should not be touched or altered.
  69. In camera: Visual effects created on set, rather than in post-production.
  70. In development: A film or TV show that is currently in the process of being created or produced.
  71. Indie: Short for "independent," refers to a film or production company that is not affiliated with a major studio.
  72. Insert shot: A close-up shot of a specific detail or object.
  73. International box office: The amount of money earned by a film from international theaters.
  74. IP: Short for "intellectual property," refers to a story, character, or concept that is protected by copyright.
  75. J-cut: A type of film editing where the audio from the next scene is heard before the visuals appear.
  76. Jump cut: A type of film editing where a single shot is broken up by removing frames, resulting in a sudden jump in time or location.
  77. Jib: A camera crane used to achieve high or low angle shots.
  78. JumboTron: A large electronic screen used to display video and graphics during events.
  79. Junior agent: An assistant or trainee to a talent agent or manager.
  80. Jukebox musical: A musical where the songs are previously released popular songs, rather than original compositions.
  81. Jumbotron: A large screen used to display video, often in a sports stadium or arena.
  82. Jump scare: A technique in horror films where a sudden loud noise or visual shock is used to startle the audience.
  83. Juvenile lead: A young actor who plays the lead role in a film or TV show.
  84. Judging card: A form used by casting directors or producers to evaluate actors during auditions.
  85. Jingle: A short, catchy tune or song used in advertising or promotion.
  86. Jacket: The protective cover used to store film or video tapes.
  87. J-cut sound: A type of audio editing where the audio from the current scene is heard in the next scene before the visuals appear.
  88. Jumbo dialogue: Excessively verbose or overwritten dialogue.
  89. Jumping the shark: A term used to describe a moment in a TV show or film where the story becomes ridiculous or unbelievable.
  90. Key grip: The head grip responsible for setting up and adjusting equipment such as cranes, dollies, and tripods.
  91. Kicker: An unexpected, humorous line at the end of a scene or dialogue.
  92. Kill fee: A payment made to a writer if their work is not used or accepted.
  93. Kill switch: A mechanism used to stop a stunt or special effect if it goes wrong or becomes dangerous.
  94. Kinetic typography: Animated text used in films or TV shows, often used for titles or credits.
  95. Kinescope: A process used to transfer live television broadcasts onto film.
  96. Kryptonite: A fictional element from the Superman franchise that weakens the superhero.
  97. Kurosawa shot: A shot where the camera tilts up quickly, similar to a technique used by director Akira Kurosawa.
  98. Leading lady: The female actor who plays the main role in a film or TV show.
  99. Leading man: The male actor who plays the main role in a film or TV show.
  100. Location manager: The person responsible for finding and securing shooting locations for a film or TV show.
  101. Looping: The process of re-recording dialogue in a studio to replace poor quality audio captured on set.
  102. Logline: A brief summary of a film or TV show used to pitch the concept to producers or studios.
  103. Low angle shot: A shot taken from a low angle, looking up at the subject.
  104. Lumière brothers: French filmmakers who invented the Cinématographe, an early motion picture camera.
  105. MacGuffin: An object or goal that drives the plot of a film or TV show, but is ultimately unimportant.
  106. Magic hour: The period of time just before sunset or just after sunrise, when the lighting is soft and warm.
  107. Main title: The opening credits of a film or TV show.
  108. Major studio: A large, established film studio with a track record of producing successful films.
  109. Makeup artist: The person responsible for applying makeup to actors to achieve the desired look for a character.
  110. Matte painting: A painted or digitally created background used to create the illusion of a location that is not physically present on set.
  111. Meet-cute: A term used to describe the moment when two characters in a film or TV show meet for the first time in a romantic or comedic context.
  112. Method acting: An acting technique that emphasizes emotional authenticity by drawing on personal experiences and emotions.
  113. Micro-budget: A film made on a very low budget, typically less than $50,000.
  114. Mid shot: A shot taken from a medium distance, framing the subject from the waist up.
  115. Mini-series: A TV show consisting of several episodes, typically less than 10, that tell a complete story.
  116. Minor studio: A smaller film studio that may not have the resources or track record of major studios.
  117. Montage: A sequence of short shots edited together to condense time or show the passage of time.
  118. Movie star: A celebrity actor who is well-known and popular among audiences.
  119. Mumblecore: A subgenre of independent film characterized by naturalistic dialogue, low budgets, and a focus on character relationships.
  120. Music supervisor: The person responsible for selecting and licensing music for a film or TV show.
  121. Musical score: The instrumental music composed specifically for a film or TV show.
  122. Musicals: Films or TV shows that feature characters breaking into song and dance as a form of storytelling.
  123. Methodology: A set of techniques or approaches used to achieve a specific result, often used in reference to film production.
  124. Narrative film: A film that tells a story through a series of events and actions.
  125. Negative pickup: A distribution deal where a distributor agrees to distribute a film after it has been completed.
  126. Neutral density filter: A camera filter that reduces the amount of light entering the lens, allowing for wider apertures and longer exposure times.
  127. New media: A term used to describe digital content created for distribution on the internet or other non-traditional platforms.
  128. Newsreel: A short film that shows news events and current affairs, often shown before feature films in theaters.
  129. Niche audience: A specific group of people who have a shared interest and are the target audience for a particular film or TV show.
  130. Non-diegetic sound: Sound that is not part of the story world, such as background music or a narrator's voice-over.
  131. Non-linear editing: A type of film editing where the sequence of shots does not follow a chronological order.
  132. Nosebleed seats: The seats at the back of a theater or stadium, typically the furthest from the stage or field.
  133. Not for attribution: A statement or comment made by a source that cannot be attributed to them by name.
  134.  Nose shot: A shot taken from a close distance, framing the subject's face from the nose up.
  135. O.S. (Off-Screen): A term used to describe sounds or dialogue that are happening off-screen, but are still heard by the audience.
  136. O.T.S. (Over-the-Shoulder Shot): A shot taken from behind one character's shoulder, showing the other character's face in the foreground.
  137. One-Sheet: A movie poster featuring the film's title, main actors, and a key image or scene.
  138. On Location: Filming that takes place outside of a studio, usually on real-life sets or locations.
  139. On the Nose: A term used to describe dialogue that is too obvious or overly explanatory.
  140. Open Call: An audition where anyone can show up and try out for a role, without an appointment.
  141. Opening Weekend: The first three days a film is released in theaters, which can often be an indicator of the movie's financial success.
  142. Option: The legal right to purchase the film rights to a book, script, or other intellectual property for a set period of time.
  143. OTT (Over-The-Top): A term used to describe performances or storytelling that are exaggerated or overly dramatic.
  144. Out of Continuity: A term used to describe a scene or shot that does not match the visual or narrative continuity of the rest of the film.
  145. Outtakes: Shots or footage that were not used in the final cut of a film, often shown during the closing credits or as bonus features on DVDs.
  146. Overcranking: A technique used to slow down the action in a shot by increasing the speed at which the camera is filming.
  147. Overhead Shot: A shot taken from above the subject, looking down at the scene or characters below.
  148. Overlapping Dialogue: Dialogue where two or more characters are speaking at the same time, often used to create a more naturalistic feel.
  149. Overnight Shoot: Filming that takes place overnight, typically from sunset to sunrise.
  150. Pacing: The rhythm and tempo of a film or TV show, often judged based on the speed and timing of the editing and storytelling.
  151. Package: A collection of elements needed to produce a film, including a script, director, and cast, often presented to a studio or distributor for consideration.
  152. Pan: A horizontal camera movement where the camera pivots left or right, often used to show a wider view of a scene or location.
  153. Panning Shot: A shot where the camera moves horizontally from one side to the other, often used to show a larger scene or setting.
  154. Parallel Action: A technique used to show two or more separate storylines happening simultaneously.
  155. Passing Shot: A shot that is taken as the camera moves by or past a subject, often used to show movement or create a sense of speed.
  156. Pay or Play: A contract clause guaranteeing a certain level of compensation for an actor, even if the film is not produced or the role is recast.
  157. Pickup Shot: A shot taken after principal photography is completed, often used to fill gaps in the final edit or correct continuity errors.
  158. Pitch: A presentation of an idea for a film, TV show, or other project, often given to a producer or studio executive in the hopes of getting the project greenlit.
  159. Playback: The process of reviewing footage on set or in post-production, often used to ensure that shots are framed and lit correctly.
  160. P.O.V. (Point of View): A shot taken from the perspective of a character, often used to show what they are seeing or experiencing.
  161. Point of View Shot: A shot taken from the perspective of a character, often used to create a sense of immersion or to show their emotional state.
  162. Practical Effect: A physical effect created on set, often using props, makeup, or animatronics, as opposed to digital effects created in post-production.
  163. Pre-Production: The planning and preparation phase of a film or TV project, which includes tasks such as casting, location scouting, and storyboarding.
  164. Producer: The person responsible for overseeing the production of a film or TV project, often involved in tasks such as hiring the director, cast, and crew, and securing financing.
  165. P.A. (Production Assistant): A member of the film crew responsible for various tasks on set, such as coordinating props or managing extras.
  166. Production Company: A company responsible for funding and overseeing the production of a film or TV project.
  167. Production Design: The process of creating the visual style and look of a film or TV project, which includes tasks such as designing sets, costumes, and props.
  168. Production Value: The overall quality of a film or TV project, often judged based on factors such as the level of detail in the sets and costumes, and the quality of the special effects.
  169. Project Greenlight: A reality TV show that follows the process of a first-time director and screenwriter getting their film made by a major Hollywood studio.
  170. Prop: An object used by actors during filming, such as a weapon, piece of furniture, or costume piece.
  171. Protagonist: The main character or hero of a story, often opposed by the antagonist.
  172. Public Domain: Works that are not protected by copyright and can be freely used or adapted by anyone, often including older films or literary works.
  173. Pull Focus: A technique used to shift the focus of a shot from one subject to another, often used to create a sense of depth or to draw the viewer's attention to a specific detail.
  174. Punchline: The final line or moment of a joke, often used to create a humorous or ironic twist.
  175. Press Kit: A collection of promotional materials created for a film or TV project, often including production stills, interviews, and bios of the cast and crew.
  176. Preview Screening: An early screening of a film or TV show for a select audience, often used to gauge audience reactions and make changes before the official release.
  177. Producer: A person responsible for overseeing and managing the production of a film or TV project, often involved in tasks such as hiring talent, securing financing, and making creative decisions.
  178. Producer's Cut: A version of a film that has been edited or altered by the film's producer(s), often reflecting their personal vision or creative choices.
  179. Production: The process of actually filming or creating a TV project, following the pre-production phase.
  180. Production Assistant (PA): A member of the film crew responsible for various tasks on set, such as coordinating props or managing extras.
  181. Production Company: A company responsible for funding and overseeing the production of a film or TV project.
  182. Production Designer: The person responsible for creating the visual style and look of a film or TV project, which includes tasks such as designing sets, costumes, and props.
  183. Project Greenlight: A TV series produced by Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, where contestants compete for the chance to direct a feature film.
  184. Production Manager: The person responsible for overseeing the logistical and financial aspects of a film or TV project, often working closely with the producer.
  185. Production Value: The overall quality of a film or TV project, often judged based on factors such as the level of detail in the sets and costumes, and the quality of the special effects.
  186. Prologue: An introductory section of a film or TV show that sets up the story or provides background information.
  187. Promotional Screening: An advance screening of a film or TV show, often held for industry professionals or members of the press, to generate buzz and positive word-of-mouth.
  188. Protagonist: The main character or hero of a story, often opposed by the antagonist.
  189. Protocol: The expected or customary behavior on a film or TV set, often related to safety, professionalism, and respect for others.
  190. Proxy: A representative who acts on behalf of another person, often used to vote or make decisions in their absence.
  191. Public Domain: Works that are not protected by copyright and can be freely used or adapted by anyone, often including older films or literary works.
  192. Pull Focus: A technique used to shift the focus of a shot from one subject to another, often used to create a sense of depth or to draw the viewer's attention to a specific detail.
  193. Pyrotechnics: The use of explosive or fiery effects on a film or TV set, often used in action or sci-fi movies to create excitement or suspense.
  194. Quick Take: A brief shot or series of shots used to capture a spontaneous moment or reaction.
  195. Quota Quickie: A low-budget film produced quickly to meet government production quotas.
  196. Q-score: A measurement of a celebrity's popularity and appeal among audiences, often used in advertising and marketing.
  197. Quiet on Set: A command used to signal that filming is about to begin and everyone should remain quiet.
  198. Quip: A clever or witty remark, often used in dialogue in a film or TV show.
  199. Quick-cut Editing: A style of editing where the shots are cut rapidly and rhythmically, often used to create a sense of energy and urgency.
  200. Quad Track: A recording technique where each instrument is recorded on a separate track, allowing for greater flexibility in the mixing process.
  201. Re-shoot: Additional filming done after principal photography to correct errors or make changes.
  202. R-rating: A rating given to films by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) indicating that the content is intended for mature audiences and is not suitable for children.
  203. Radio play: A drama or comedy performed on the radio.
  204. Ramp: A sudden increase in the loudness of a soundtrack or the speed of an action.
  205. Rap: To discuss and work out details of a script or production.
  206. Raw footage: The unedited, unprocessed footage shot during a production.
  207. Reboot: A new version of a film franchise that starts over with new actors and storylines.
  208. Red carpet: The ceremonial path that celebrities walk on to enter a movie premiere or awards show.
  209. Redub: To record new dialogue or sound effects in post-production.
  210. Reference reel: A collection of clips used to show the style and tone of a film or TV show.
  211. Reframing: Adjusting the framing of a shot during post-production.
  212. Rehearsal: A practice session where actors and crew run through a scene or the entire production.
  213. Release date: The date when a film or TV show is made available to the public.
  214. Remake: A new version of a film using the same basic plot and characters as the original.
  215. Render: The process of turning computer-generated images or special effects into a final visual product.
  216. Reshoots: Additional filming done after principal photography to correct errors or make changes.
  217. Resolution: The clarity and detail of an image or video, often measured in pixels.
  218. Response card: A survey given to test audiences to collect feedback on a film or TV show.
  219. Retake: Filming a scene again because of a mistake or poor performance.
  220. Reverse angle: A shot taken from the opposite side of the main camera angle.
  221. Riser: A platform used to elevate a camera or actor during a production.
  222. Road movie: A film that follows a character or characters on a journey or road trip.
  223. Robotic camera: A camera mounted on a robotic arm for precise and controlled movement.
  224. Rockumentary: A documentary about a rock band or musician.
  225. Rolling: The command given to start filming or recording.
  226. Rough cut: A preliminary version of a film or TV show, with minimal editing and no special effects.
  227. Rotoscoping: A process used in animation and special effects where live-action footage is traced and redrawn frame-by-frame.
  228. Royalty-free: Music or footage that can be used without paying a royalty fee.
  229. Run time: The length of a film or TV show in minutes.
  230. Running gag: A comedic device used repeatedly throughout a film or TV show.
  231. Rushes: The first raw footage shot during a production, often viewed by the director and editor to determine which takes to use in the final cut.
  232. Rural comedy: A type of comedy set in a rural or small-town setting.
  233. Russian arm: A camera rig mounted on a car that allows for smooth tracking shots.
  234. SAG: Screen Actors Guild, a labor union that represents film and television actors.
  235. Scene: A portion of a film or TV show that takes place in a specific location and time.
  236. Scenics: Art department personnel responsible for building and painting sets.
  237. Score: The music created specifically for a film or TV show.
  238. Screenplay: The written version of a film or TV show that includes dialogue and stage directions.
  239. Screen time: The amount of time an actor appears on screen in a film or TV show.
  240. Script: The written version of a film or TV show, including dialogue, scene descriptions, and stage directions.
  241. Script supervisor: A person who oversees continuity during filming and keeps track of script changes.
  242. Second unit: A separate unit responsible for filming action and location shots, often without the main actors.
  243. Sequel: A follow-up film or TV show that continues the story or characters from the original.
  244. Set: The physical location where filming takes place, often built or designed specifically for the production.
  245. Set decorator: A person responsible for the overall look and design of a film or TV show's sets.
  246. Set dresser: A person responsible for the details and finishing touches of a film or TV show's sets.
  247. Set dressing: The process of adding props and decorative elements to a set to create a specific look and feel.
  248. Set extension: The use of special effects or visual effects to extend or enhance a set beyond its physical limitations.
  249. Set list: A list of all the shots and scenes that will be filmed on a given day.
  250. Set up: The preparation and arrangement of equipment, props, and sets before filming begins.
  251. Shooting script: A revised version of the screenplay used during production that includes notes and revisions.
  252. Short: A film or video that is shorter than a feature-length production.
  253. Shot: A single, continuous sequence of film or video captured by a camera.
  254. Shot list: A detailed list of all the shots that will be filmed for a particular scene or sequence.
  255. Show bible: A document that outlines the characters, world, and storylines of a TV show.
  256. Showrunner: The person responsible for overseeing the day-to-day production and creative direction of a TV show.
  257. Sides: Pages from a script used by actors during auditions or rehearsals.
  258. Silent film: A film that has no synchronized dialogue or sound effects.
  259. Single: A shot of a single character, often used in dialogue scenes.
  260. Slate: The clapperboard or digital device used to mark the beginning of a shot for synchronization in post-production.
  261. Slow burn: A gradual build-up of tension or conflict in a scene or story.
  262. Slow motion: A visual effect used to slow down the speed of a shot.
  263. Snipe: A small graphic or text element that appears on a screen for a brief moment, often used for promotional purposes.
  264. Soap opera: A TV show that features a continuous storyline and focuses on interpersonal relationships and melodrama.
  265. Sound design: The process of creating and editing sound effects, music, and dialogue for a film or TV show.
  266. Sound editor: A person responsible for editing and mixing sound elements for a film or TV show.
  267. Sound effects: Audio elements used to enhance or create a specific mood or atmosphere in a film or TV show.
  268. Soundstage: A large indoor space specifically designed for filming, with controlled lighting and sound.
  269. Soundtrack: The music playing behind the scenes of a movie. It includes the score and oftentimes pop music. 
  270. Table read: A rehearsal where the cast reads the script out loud for the first time.
  271. Talent: A performer, including actors, singers, dancers, and other entertainers.
  272. Teleplay: A script written specifically for television.
  273. Teleprompter: A device used to display scrolling text for actors or presenters to read.
  274. Test screening: A preview of a film or TV show shown to a small audience to gauge their reactions and make changes.
  275. Thriller: A genre of film or TV show that creates suspense and excitement through danger and tension.
  276. Title card: A graphic or text element used to introduce a film or TV show, often including the title and credits.
  277. Tracking shot: A shot that follows a moving subject, often with a camera mounted on a dolly or Steadicam.
  278. Trailer: A promotional video or clip used to promote a film or TV show before its release.
  279. Treatment: A written outline of a story or idea for a film or TV show.
  280. Unit production manager: A person responsible for overseeing the day-to-day production and managing the budget and schedule.
  281. Unit publicist: A person responsible for promoting a film or TV show to the media and the public.
  282. Upstage: The area of the stage farthest from the audience.
  283. VFX: Visual effects, used to create or enhance elements of a film or TV show that cannot be captured on camera.
  284. Voice-over: A recording of dialogue or narration that is played over a scene.
  285. Walk and talk: A shot that follows characters as they move and talk, often used to convey a sense of urgency or importance.
  286. Wardrobe: The clothing and accessories worn by the cast of a film or TV show.
  287. Wide shot: A shot that captures a broad view of a scene, often used to establish a location or setting.
  288. Wild sound: Ambient or natural sound recorded on location, used to enhance a scene or add realism.
  289. Wipe: A transition effect where one shot is replaced by another with a horizontal or vertical moving line.
  290. Wrap: The completion of filming for a particular scene or the entire production.
  291. Writer: A person who writes or adapts the script for a film or TV show.
  292. X-rated: A rating used for films or TV shows that contain explicit sexual content.
  293. Yellow screen: A screen used for chroma keying or green screen effects, often painted yellow to avoid conflicts with certain colors.
  294. Zoom: A camera technique that adjusts the focal length to change the size and perspective of the subject.