July 7, 2013

Watch Meta-tastic Trailers for Jean-Luc Godard's 3D Films 'Adieu Au Langage' and '3X3D'

Godard 3D glassesAbout a month ago we shared that French filmmaker and all-around storytelling genius (obviously I'm biased) Jean-Luc Godard was dipping his toe in the 3D water, with Adieu Au Langage, a film about "a man and his wife who no longer speak the same language." For those of you who were as astonished as I was that Godard was trying his hand at 3D filmmaking, with a camera setup he and his cinematographer built no less, here's another thing that might be of interest to you: Adieu Au Langage isn't even Godard's first 3D film. Hit the jump to see trailers for the experimental 3X3D as well as his latest feature.

I always feel that before I show my family and friends a Godard film that I have to preface it with the fact that he's a tad eccentric and doesn't follow all the filmmaking conventions, and I feel that sentiment now with this 3-minute trailer. It's -- something else. It switches between footage taken from what seems like different formats, one of which I'd bet is mini-DV. The jump cuts and red, white, and blue color palette remind you that you're watching something Godard created. First, quick word of caution: the trailer is NSFW since there's full frontal nudity, but here it is if you want to check it out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFMTr2UBQWc

Like I said before, this is not Godard's first 3D film. According to The Playlist3X3D, which is compiled of segments by 3 directors: Godard (The Three Disasters,) Peter Greenaway (Just In Time,) and Edgar Pera (Cinesapiens) screened at Cannes this last Spring, "quietly" closing the Cannes’ Critics’ Week.  I'm uncertain about Greenway and Pera, but Godard is known for making self-referential and meta films, and 3X3D is no different. Each segment of the film is about the use and impact of 3D itself. Check out the trailer below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yp6APf1ER4s

What do you think about Jean-Luc Godard's latest film? Why do you think he chose to shoot it in 3D? What do you think Godard is trying to say about 3D in 3X3D? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Link: Jean-Luc Godard Goes 3D: Watch Trailers for 'Adieu Au Langage' & Omnibus '3X3D' -- The Playlist

Your Comment

12 Comments

That trailer looks fucking awesome. The pacing and stilted language reminds me of Dogtooth and Attenberg, I wonder if Godard's been inspired by all the recent weird greek films.

July 7, 2013 at 4:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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colm

Dogtooth is one of my all-time favs! Happy to see a fan!

July 7, 2013 at 5:20PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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V Renée
Nights & Weekends Editor
Writer/Director

How the mighty have fallen, his films have reverted to student-film like quality. He may have been cool and hip once but those days are far behind him.

July 7, 2013 at 4:34PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Marlon

'He may have been cool and hip once'.

Good grief: if anybody seriously believes that JLG's reputation rests upon some perceived level of 'coolness', then they've clearly found their natural level of debate. Let me guess your frame of reference here, Marl: a bare handful of '60s Godards, probably at college when you were trying to look sophisticated, and little else.

July 7, 2013 at 6:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dolly

A lot of New Wave films looked like student films, Because Master Thesis Films at the University of Southern California (USC) have Larger Budgets than many European feature-films, and in some cases larger crews.

Take a look at Eric Rohmer's Pauline at the Beach (1983, Pauline à la plage) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086087/fullcredits?ref_=tt_cl_sm#cast There was no script girl, Rohmer kept his own script notes. The only dolly shot was shot from a convertible that was pushed down the street. Lighting consisted of two Lowel folding 2K soft lights. The info comes from Néstor Almendros book "Man with a Camera.

July 7, 2013 at 8:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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c.d.embrey

I second that, and I also highly recommend the Almendros book.

Almendros was shooting interiors using natural light on 50 ASA colour stocks back in the mid '60s. When someone like that offers advice regarding shooting and lighting on a budget, the wise man listens. There are a few second-hand copies floating around on Amazon, and well worth grabbing.

July 7, 2013 at 9:29PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dolly

First off, questioning whether Godard (who has one of the most impressive track records in the history of cinema) was inspired by Dogtooth and Attenberg is close to unimaginable. Despite the fact that these may be okay films on their own turf, they're in a different ballpark all-together compared to what Godard has been doing for around five decades.

Secondly, I admire Godards progressive vision, which likely prompted him to run through every technology he could get his hands on (witness 'primitive' digital editing of Histoire(s) Du Cinéma, or the handycams visible in JLG/JLG). But one thing I draw from the 'Adieu Au Langage' trailer is that natural acting and unpolished filming might thrive by the instant 'aura' of film. I really have to look for the Godard underneath what simply looks like awkwardly shot 5D footage. Also, even his idiosyncratic use of typography/inserts (Pierrot Le Fou; 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her .. to name a couple?) has been reduced to what looks like the default font of windows movie maker.(3x3D looks kinda cool, though).

Godard+3D? Sounds like something that could really shake things up (again). The trailer for Adieu'? Doesn't look the part.

July 7, 2013 at 7:06PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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tc

I agree the trailer feels somewhat undercooked, but I think the awkwardness of 'new' images or imaging technology has always been part and parcel of Godard's work.

Ditto crude graphics: much of the Groupe Dziga Vertov output has its titles slapped in poster paint or marker pen across cardboard, whilst his video work from the late ‘70s, as well as ‘Ici et Ailleurs’ (1976) makes use of the crudest dot matrix graphics imaginable.

I read an interesting article about how people have been accusing Godard of the same things for nearly fifty years now, and continue to do so without any sense of irony or self-awareness. I can't find the link, so here are the quotes, typed up from 'Godard on Godard' (Milne)...

"This botched film, which its director has the effrontery to dedicate to Jean Vigo..."

"Scenes shot at random, edited any old how, stuffed with continuity errors..."

"A proof of this incapacity to make us see is the reliance on written texts – texys of pitiful inadequacy..."

"Not to mention the wilful mystification…”

“Godard wallows in his own mire by using over-exposed photography…”

“He takes it upon himself to exalt lousy photography into a system…”

“A film shot wild, where each image reveals the director’s supreme contempt for the audience…”

“A badly made, badly lit, badly everything film…”

The above are quotes from contemporary reviews of ‘Les Carabiniers’ (1963). So, whilst Godard’s naysayers may kid themselves that their criticisms of his latest film are somehow bold or daring (and I expect a flood of negative reviews for 'Adieu Au Langage'), all the historical evidence suggests those opinions are of no consequence in the long run. The work will prevail.

July 7, 2013 at 8:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dolly

Don't get me wrong, I totally agree Godard is on another level compared to those new greek filmmakers. I love Dogtooth and Attenberg, but obviously they are entirely different in approach and effect than any Godard film, without even thinking about the influence Godard has inflicted, so to speak, on the world of cinema. However, Godard is obviously a voracious watcher of films, and I don't think its entirely ridiculous to think that he might have seen them and been intrigued or inspired (even a bit) by some of the filmic language they used.

Also, I like what you said about having to "look for the Godard" in this trailer. From what I've read about the man I imagine he'd take that as a compliment!

July 8, 2013 at 5:31AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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colm

May I suggest that Godard's films are in a different ballpark than those of Lanthimos', because there are literally thousands of "ballparks." Certain filmmakers choose to use the medium differently, and comparing them is like comparing apples to oranges. I'm a fanatic of Godard's films and obsess about him daily (I have a problem, guys,) but there are plenty of films that remind me of Godard films and vice versa -- it doesn't take away from Godard's work or an individual's understanding of it. (I guess this would be a bad time to mention that Wes Anderson's films always remind me of Godard's films...)

July 9, 2013 at 12:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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V Renée
Nights & Weekends Editor
Writer/Director

"For those of you who were as astonished as I was that Godard was trying his hand at 3D filmmaking..."

It shouldn't be that astonishing. Even the Three Stooges took a hand at it in 1953. (Although it was crappy technology.)

Oh and Hitch did, too.

July 8, 2013 at 5:19PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Hitch had only one great "relief shot" in the whole film, but I've never seen it in actual depth. Almost flew to NYC for a 3D screening in the 80s.

July 8, 2013 at 5:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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