September 4, 2013

Vimeo To Pay Filmmakers $10,000 for Content in New Distribution Model

vimeo-e1378182278821Vimeo has long been known for the quality of their video, and has become a haven for filmmakers who want a higher quality upload than is available from other video sites. Now they are experimenting with a new platform whereby filmmakers who debut their films at the Toronto Film Festival this week are eligible for $10,000 in funding if they distribute through Vimeo On Demand, the site's online distribution channel launched in March earlier this year. Click below to check out this new platform and see what it could mean for indie filmmakers.

Vimeo On Demand will offer filmmakers 90% of sales and a $10,000 advance. While Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor admits this isn't enough to fund most feature films, it could be a real shot in the arm for films that are already at festivals and require additional funding for post-production and marketing:

In exchange, Vimeo gets to be the exclusive distributor of those films online or on other digital platforms for 30 days, or until the film makes back its advance — whichever comes first. After that, filmmakers are free to sell the film on iTunes, license to Netflix or Amazon, or make their movies available wherever they want online.

Many filmmakers have taken advantage of the service so far, including documentary filmmaker Sean Dunne, whose latest film is Oxyana, a feature-length documentary about a West Virginia town ravaged by Oxycontin addiction. Watch the trailer:

Dunne is also the director of the great documentary short American Juggalo, and Vimeo has posted an in-depth interview with him here. Speaking about Vimeo On Demand, the director says:

Vimeo on Demand was something I was drawn to from the first time I heard about it. Tribeca opened a lot of doors but the traditional distribution methods that were being presented to us seemed obsolete and would have tied the film up and prevented it from coming out for a long time.

Check out Dunne's American Juggalos:

What do you think? As an indie filmmaker, how do you feel about this new distribution platform, and would you be willing to pursue a similar path to get your work out there? Let us know!

Links:

[via TechCrunch & paidContent]

Your Comment

18 Comments

I think Sean Dunne is a pompous, self righteous filmmaker who passes off shallow, extractive doc film as observant and aesthetic. Bullshit. That is what I think.

September 4, 2013 at 11:18AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Adam

having a bad day Adam? way off topic...

September 4, 2013 at 11:38AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dan

I am not trying to knock Vimeo, always been a big fan, but has anyone else noticed lately that video quality there seems no better than Youtube, in fact Youtube may actually be better at higher res. Vimeo seems flickery to me. Also, I consistently have trouble playing Vimeo videos, and if I need to back up, rewind, or start over, forget about it. Youtube videos, even at the highest quality always play flawlessly and I can scrub videos forward or backward with ease. Am I the only one?

September 4, 2013 at 11:27AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jonesy

No, I'm with you too. The Vimeo player is SO slow. I think YT 1080p looks way better than Vimeo 720p and it plays/loads much faster. I do like that you can download the original file from Vimeo but that's about it.

September 4, 2013 at 11:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Strange here in Kenya (with poor internet speeds) it is the other way; Vimeo streams steadily, especially on demand; while youtube will mostly just getting stuck!

September 4, 2013 at 11:45PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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yep and the search engine is problematic. I just knocked down from pro to plus because of issues.

September 4, 2013 at 11:39AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dan

yup I totally agree - there are many flaws in the Vimeo software and I really wish they would focus on fixing them instead of throwing out new features every month. I'm sure they could use some of the grant money to fix it all and make it better or just as good as youtube - becuase their engine is indeed flawless but obviously there is more quantity than quality in their content

September 4, 2013 at 12:21PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Tony

I like the look of Vimeo's player and the overall feel of the entire site, and really can't stand Youtube's site at all, but that not enough to keep me from defecting to Youtube. Cool features aside, it's really all about video quality. My current Vimeo plus membership will most likely be my last. It's kinda sad too because I like the overall Vimeo culture.

September 4, 2013 at 12:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Jonesy

I'm right with you. I love Vimeo, the culture, the groups-- the overall "artist vibe".... but it sucks to see youtube 1080 destroying Vimeo 1080 which is a feature of the "plus" membership. I can't justify renewing my subscription either... really too bad.

September 4, 2013 at 8:32PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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James

Totally agree man! I was in love with Vimeo early on because of the quality of its video and the community of artists uploading great stuff. Felt more like a filmmakers venue. But between the speed of the player and the less than great quality of its full HD compared to YouTube, I'm not feeling so enthusiastic about it.

Not to mention the complete set of analytics and higher viewership of YouTube...

Even though I still dislike what I perceive as added contrast to my vids on YouTube that didn't happen on Vimeo, I've been posting way more stuff on YT in the past year...

Get it together Vimeo!

November 19, 2013 at 11:08AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Brad T

I just tried to upload a video there, probably for the last time. I am a lowly non-membership guy but I remember when you could upload full HD, almost any codec at any file size and it would look great. They've really done a number on the non-membership user features. Youtube it is.

September 4, 2013 at 2:52PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Kevin

I echo what Luke said. The only thing other than the ability to download the original file is the fact that Vimeo displays your video in its actual aspect ratio. Those two things are the only things I'm a fan of really when it comes to Vimeo.

September 4, 2013 at 8:24PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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I totally agree on the YouTube retardness of non-16/9 aspect ratio. Horrible black top & bottom bars with 2.40:1 aspect.

September 6, 2013 at 11:25AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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It has it's problems for a producer when you give up world wide IP rights to Vimeo. It might be 30 days but that exclusivity can be detrimental when looking for wider VOD or broadcast rights after the period. The money is in broadcast not in VOD (for the time being) and the only way to recoup your budget. Broadcasters do not look kindly on films that have premiered online for the simple reason it has been seen. Sean Dunne is correct, broadcasters take forever to their exclusive negotiate contracts then find a date for your film. If your film sits in the zero budget to $10k budget, and you have festivals under your belt its an easier decision to take the money and run... and make another film.

September 4, 2013 at 11:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dan

Vimeo has to market to consumers before the pros. Otherwise, who will watch these videos. It's a shame that Barry Diller let this business lay so dormant over the years. Maybe it needs a little fire lit under its butt (not a Barry Diller joke) with a new competitor popping up almost daily.

September 4, 2013 at 3:01PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

Agreed. Not enough everyday consumers venture to vimeo for content. If they figure out how to market to the youtube culture all of us would benefit. Youtube videos get millions of views like its nobodies busines. A video on Vimeo with tens of thousands of views seem like a lot.

September 4, 2013 at 3:15PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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carlos

I hope Vimeo distribution is successful, if they figure it out independent filmmakers could finally have control over distribution and see profits without signing shitty deals with bigger studios.

But they've got to fix a few simple things that should have been addressed a long time ago. Youtube HD now looks as good and many times better, mostly due to easily selected different resolutions.

VImeo player needs the option of SD/720/1080 within a single player. I dont get why its not an option yet. Also the search egine is god awful!!!!! As mentioned above these couple quirks should really be addressed already.

September 4, 2013 at 3:12PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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carlos

I'm a filmmaker, I love films but why does my Vimeo home page give me staff selects I am not interested in?
Don't tell me you love me Vimeo, clean up your home page and make it as simple as possible for ME to navigate.
Your ON DEMAND is hidden at the bottom of the page, that is not a vote of confidence in the films you have signed up.

September 4, 2013 at 5:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Dan