June 9, 2016
INDIE FILM WEEKLY

The World's Most Advanced Camera & Death of the Underpaid PA [PODCAST]

PA
This episode of Indie Film Weekly brings word of a collaboration between camera giants Panavision and RED, and a new policy that may change the Hollywood system forever.

Film industry powerhouses Panavision and RED have teamed up to create arguably the world’s most advanced cinema camera, the Panavision Millennium Digital XL 8K. Meanwhile, in Washington, an even more industry-shaking announcement has been made: Obama's plan to require time-and-a-half overtime pay for lower-income workers may forever change the way producers deal with assistants trying to climb the production ladder.

Managing Editor Emily Buder and I discuss these developments, along with some news about Netflix binge-watching, the indie-ness of Amazon's new programming, and updates from last weekend's Cinegear Expo in L.A. As always, the episode includes our Ask No Film School segment, plus grant and festival deadlines, upcoming indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.

Show Links & Mentions

No Film School articles 

Filmmaking Tools

Upcoming Deadlines: Grants & Opportunities

Upcoming Deadlines: Festivals

Film Releases

VOD

Netflix

Theatrical


Please subscribe and rate us on iTunesSoundcloud, or the podcasting app of your choice. You can play all of our Indie Film Weekly episodes right here:

This episode of Indie Film Weekly was produced and edited by Jon Fusco. Featured photo by a katz / Shutterstock.com.

Your Comment

9 Comments

Ugh I love these podcasts..

June 9, 2016 at 10:12AM

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Jamie Cooper
DP / Cinephile
148

Thanks, Jamie! That means a lot!

June 9, 2016 at 10:23AM, Edited June 9, 10:23AM

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Liz Nord
Documentary Filmmaker/Multi-platform Producer

Download link?

June 9, 2016 at 10:37AM

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Scott Vanderbilt
Production Sound mixer
184

Hey Scott, you should be able to download right from the Soundcloud embed above. There's a little "download" icon right next to the "share" button.

June 9, 2016 at 11:37AM, Edited June 9, 11:37AM

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Liz Nord
Documentary Filmmaker/Multi-platform Producer

Thanks! It's there now. It wasn't when it was first posted.

June 10, 2016 at 10:39AM

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Scott Vanderbilt
Production Sound mixer
184

I would think the Lytro camera holds the crown for most advanced camera?http://nofilmschool.com/2016/04/lytro-cinema-camera-cinematography-demo

June 10, 2016 at 11:28AM

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Timothy Cook
Self employed storyteller.
307

I'm not going to disagree that the intern / PA positions have been abused in the past, of course they have. In some ways that's part of the job. In many ways the jobs are the "wax on, wax off" torture test to see who has what it takes to make it in a very, very highly competitive business. I'm not saying that the abuse is always appropriate, but sometimes it's testing.

We have a small production company and a couple of years ago we took on an intern. We busted his butt, we loved him but we worked him hard. After seeing his grit we hired him for a year in a paid position where he gained a foothold in this business and went on to work for much bigger productions than ours. If all positions become only paid potions or at least higher paid potions then I'm only going to hire more experienced people or not hire at all. Worst of all, most employers are only going to hire inexperienced workers who help them politically, like the son or daughter or nephew of someone they want to curry favors with. I disagree that this move will "level the playing field", in fact I think it will have the opposite effect. I think that this is a step backwards to the days where the people that got the job were part of the "Lucky Sperm Donor Club" and familial ties was what opened doors for most of the new film business recruits.

June 10, 2016 at 11:31AM

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Wes Llewellyn
Director
121

Maybe the question you should be asking yourself is would you ask your son or daughter to work for your company for free for a year, with the chance of maybe getting a paid job at the end? If not then why would you ask someone else to do it?

June 11, 2016 at 5:19PM

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matt
880

The name of this website is "No Film School". You pay money to go to school and, as they said in the pod cast, you have interns with $100,000 in student loans. Why? This is one of the few industries where you don't need a degree to work in it, you just need to know what you are doing. Yes, yes I would have my son or daughter work in an unpaid position for a company as long as they are learning and growing. An unpaid internship is cheep in comparison to tuition. I have a friend who had an internship on a sitcom where one of his jobs was to make sure there was enough breakfast cereal for the writers. He noticed that the favorite cereal by far was Lucky Charms, so when the head writer came in and found an empty box my friend just smiled, opened a cabinet and produced a fresh box of the magically delicious treat. It was his hard work and attention to detail that earned him a Jr. writing position and later a head writer position and later a producer position on some big network shows. If he never had the opening opportunity with an unpaid position then he might never have had the opportunity to be a producer. He is not the son of a big Hollywood producer, he is the son of a farmer from Iowa. I just feel if you take away the opportunity for us common folk to work their way into the industry then all you are going to find in the industry are the privileged. The internships are NOT going to turn into paid positions, they are just going to go away. The networks will just make the writers get their own cereal.

June 12, 2016 at 5:25PM, Edited June 12, 5:27PM

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Wes Llewellyn
Director
121