August 17, 2016

Adding Captions to Your Film is Super Easy (Thanks to Premiere Pro's Update)

The process of adding captions to your projects is simpler than you might think.

At the end of your long journey of making a film, perhaps the last thing you feel motivated to do is add captions to it. However, it's really not as complicated or as time-consuming as it seems. Editor Jason Boone of PremiumBeat walks you through the very simple steps of of adding both closed and open captions, as well as exporting them using Adobe Premiere Pro.

See, it's really not that bad. Granted, he only had to caption an 8-second clip, and if you're doing, say, closed captions for your entire project or have one that requires a lot of subtitles, it's admittedly going to take a really long time. However, Premiere Pro's new update really streamlines this workflow to make adding captions much quicker and more efficient.

Or, you know, if you have the money, you could always hire someone to do this for you. (Considering how not-hard it is, though, you might want to just do it yourself.)      

Your Comment

10 Comments

The update didn't change this, as far as I know. Doesn't appear to be any different than it has been. Good tutorial though.

August 17, 2016 at 9:20AM

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Rob Viscardis
Filmmaker/Editor
69

I'll stick with rev.com

August 17, 2016 at 11:29AM

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Brad Jones
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor
354

For showing us this kind sir, you will earn one hundred million internets..

November 12, 2016 at 6:43AM

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Terrence Klaverweide
Art Director
166

ARGG! I thought Adobe had finally updated the painful CC Premiere Pro workflow but after watching the video this is EXACTLY how it always has been. There is no new update :(

August 17, 2016 at 12:13PM

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Aaron Nanto
Creator/Filmmaker
243

I found open caption increases the final file size significantly

August 17, 2016 at 4:25PM, Edited August 17, 4:25PM

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I use Annotation Edit. It's so much simpler to use. I translated and captioned 3 interviews (arround 30 minutes each) in less than 6 hours. I guess that's pretty impressive. I used Quick Spotting (creates the captions according to waveform) and exported a png image sequence and a final cut xml, which I then open in premiere and that's it. I can also export an xml with titles and then I'm even able to edit within premiere, but there are some bugs with this workflow, it screws the fonts and positions, I'm still getting a hand of it.

August 18, 2016 at 7:37AM

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I never used that feature before - now I know why... It doesn't make sense that the + sign does not insert the new caption and end the outpoint of the last one - where you are on the time line... You have to actually type in the ins and outs on each caption? That doesn't seem right.

August 18, 2016 at 2:20PM

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Film GRIT
Host With The Most
320

Good tutorial. But wow, what a clunky interface. Still, easier than making titles and using them as subtitles.

August 18, 2016 at 6:32PM, Edited August 18, 6:32PM

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Erik Stenbakken
Videographer & Photographer
353

This is so good http://ClansGuild.com

November 15, 2016 at 7:00AM

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coins
25

In conjunction with this, I've got a tutorial on how to get your script timed free for use within Premiere Pro . While it's common knowledge YouTube will generate captioning automatically, they often aren't great. This same engine will time your scripts to match your video. Here's the short workflow hack on it:

http://michaelkammes.com/workflow/get-your-scripted-content-timed-for-ca...

January 24, 2017 at 5:51PM

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Michael Kammes
Director of Technology, Host of 5 THINGS Tech Series
155