July 6, 2013

Nikon Seeks to Solve Camera Overheating with Removable Heat Storage Patent

Nikon Removable Heat StorageIf you've ever been on a long shoot, then maybe you have experienced an overheating camera, and if so, then you know the frustration of waiting until it cools. Nikon aims to solve this issue. Nikon has a patent pending on a removable heat storage unit for DSLR cameras that absorbs the heat produced by the sensor. In the same way you might interchange batteries or memory cards, Nikon's removable heat storage will allow you to switch one out for another, allowing one to cool and keeping your longer shoots on schedule. For some more info and schematics, hit the jump.

DSLRs produce and emit a lot of heat, especially from the LCD screen when working in Live Mode for extended periods of time. Nikon's heat storage is arranged between the LCD screen and sensor, and will absorb the heat produced by the sensor through the Pelteir Effect. Once the temperature reaches or exceeds a predetermined level, the heat storage can then be interchanged with another unit like a battery.

This comes to us from Egami, which was machine translated by Nikon Rumors:

In a digital camera, a latent heat storage material is arranged near the image sensor, and there are some which suppressed the temperature rise of the image sensor periphery by carrying out accumulation of the heat emitted from the image sensor to a latent heat storage material by a phase change.

Nikon Removable Heat Storage_2

Since the patent was only recently filed in Japan (and our source is written in Japanese, which I don't speak), there really isn't a ton of information on this, like what cameras will be involved. However, we can all imagine that being able to interchange the heat storage on a DSLR will allow for greater efficiency on set, as well as saving filmmakers the headache of a hot camera.

What do you think? Has overheating caused you problems on set? Would something like this save you a lot of hassle? Let us know in the comments.

Link: Nikon patents removable heat storage -- Nikon Rumors

[via Egami]

Your Comment

14 Comments

Very bizarre, I've never had nor even heard of a Nikon heating up to the point of shutdown. Could this possibly be some solution to an as yet unreleased product that may suffer heat issues? Possibly due to high frame rates at raw data rates? Hint hint ;-)

July 6, 2013 at 9:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Peter

I wonder if they got this idea from playing Mass Effect 2 or 3.

July 6, 2013 at 9:46AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Chris

I get about an hour's shooting time before my Nikon starts to over heat. If there is a higher temp in the room that is more like 20 - 30 minutes. I try to keep live view off when not shooting. I like to think that helps a bit.

July 6, 2013 at 10:37AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Otherwise known as ice cubes.

But seriously, my d600 has never had heat issues.

July 6, 2013 at 11:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Tom

This a brilliant idea! Glad to see someone is thinking over there. Hope the start thinking outside the box on some other things they've been neglecting.

July 6, 2013 at 11:20AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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There is a lot of computation taking place when the raw data is taken from the sensor (and then debayered internally). The more information is relayed and crunched, the more power is needed and the more heat is generated - in other words, 4K generates a lot more heat than 2K. The computational power of the embedded CPU's and GPU's is less of a problem (the biggest development there is for the smart phone and light tablet market, which is enormous) than working through/with the heat these CPU's/GPU's generate. This is why many lower pro 4K/DSLR style cameras have only the outboard and no internal 4K recording capability. So, figuring out how to dissipate heat is potentially huge news for having an all-in-one 4K unit that can write to an off the shelf SSD card.

July 6, 2013 at 11:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

I was recording a Play at my school once with my T2i and because of the overheating, I had to stop recording in the middle of it. However, when I attached a battery grip, I never had that problem since.
I later switched to the 5D mark 3 and didn't have a heating problem with or without a battery grip.

July 6, 2013 at 2:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Hubert

"lower pro 4K/DSLR style cameras"?

What are you even talking about? The only DSLR that shoots 4K is the 1D-C and that's via internal recording... There are absolutely ZERO DSLR's on the market that output a 4K signal to an outboard recorder... The closest you could get to that would be the FS-700 but that's not a "DSLR"...

July 6, 2013 at 2:53PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Angus

I am talking about the 4K DSLR style camera that aren't on the market yet (by the large, due to costs associated with the internal heat factor ... in other words, it can be done but at an extra investment in heat resistant wiring, isolation of heat producing and heat vulnerable components, etc.) but that will be appearing on the market within the next 2-3 years. As I said, CPU's/GPU's generate a lot of heat when working continuously with 4K (way beyond the snap shot photography or 1080p video). The Nikon solution seems like a very inexpensive one. Alexa, not that I've dithered around with the screwdriver inside it, has the luxury of more internal space and higher quality components. 1D C costs $5K more than 1D X and records to essentially an obsolete codec in 8-bit. Low end Sony have likewise eased on the computational demands for the NEX series.

July 6, 2013 at 4:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

My D800's never overheated and at the Australian Open tennis this year it was about 109 degrees and shooting outside all day. I was overheated tho :(

I agree I dont think any of the current Nikons have heat issues.

Also just because a patent is filed doesn't mean they intend to implement it.

July 7, 2013 at 1:09PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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How about converting this 'enormous' heat somehow into electrical charge and charge the battery on the go? Heat dissipation and longer battery time, all in one. Something like turbocharge does to diesel engine.

July 7, 2013 at 11:44PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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That sounds cool but it might be a big camera :)

July 8, 2013 at 2:15AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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But it'll be fast (with with the turbo strapped on and all).

July 8, 2013 at 12:10PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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DLD

That would probably require a thermo couple, but then you are going to need a head sink and a fan. No way it would charge the battery, think about it... Battery runs camera to take film, creates heat, that heat was not 100% of where the power was used. That heat created was only a small inefficiency. Then to use battery to run a fan? More losses.

July 11, 2013 at 7:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

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Andrew