Nikon Introduces D750 DSLR Filmmaker's Kit & D810A for Astrophotography

Nikon D750 DSLR Filmmakers Kit

If you're upgrading from an APS-C DSLR with a kit lens, or this is your first and you want a complete shooting camera right off the bat, Nikon might have the bundle for you. They've just introduced the D750 DSLR Filmmaker's Kit, which contains the full-frame camera as well as three lenses, an Atomos Ninja 2 external recorder, variable ND filters, and more. This kit also saves you a little over $800 if you bought everything separately, so there's more to it than just saving you time and energy from getting these items separately.

Here's everything included in the bundle, which comes in its own special case:

  • Nikon D750 Full-Frame DSLR
  • AF-S NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G ED Lens
  • AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Lens
  • AF-S NIKKOR 85mm f/1.8G Lens
  • Atomos Ninja 2 Video Recorder
  • ME-1 Stereo Microphone
  • Tiffen 58mm Variable ND Filter
  • Tiffen 67mm Variable ND Filter
  • HC-E1 18" HDMI Cable
  • Two Spare EN-EL15 Li-Ion Batteries
  • Availability: February 2015
  • Price: $4,000

Nikon D750 DSLR Filmmakers Kit

You'll still need a few more accessories, like SD cards for the camera and hard drives if you want to record from the Atomos, but it's not a bad kit if you were already looking at Nikon cameras and want something that's basically ready for you to shoot.

Here was Nikon's launch video with the D750:

As for the D750, if you're unfamiliar, here are the specs on that:

  • 24.3MP Full-frame CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processor
  • 3.2" 1,229k-Dot RGBW Tilting LCD Monitor
  • Multi-CAM 3500FX II 51-Point AF Sensor
  • Photo ISO: 100 - 12800 (Extended Mode: 50 - 51200)
  • 1920 x 1080 at 24, 25, 30, 50, 60fps
  • 1280 x 720: 24, 25, 30, 50, 60fps
  • Video Clip Length: 1920 x 1080 at 60 fps: 29 min. 59 seconds
  • Video ISO: 200 - 12800
  • Dual SD Card Slot
  • Continuous Autofocus During Video
  • Continuous Image Shooting Up to 6.5 fps
  • 91k-Pixel RGB Sensor and Group Area AF
  • Built-In Wi-Fi Connectivity
  • Time Lapse Shooting & Exposure Smoothing
  • 1/8" Headphone, 1/8" Microphone, HDMI C (Mini), USB 2.0
  • Uncompressed HDMI 8-bit 4:2:2
Nikon D810A DSLR Front No Lens

Nikon also introduced a camera specifically for astrophotography, the D810A. While you might be wondering why we'd talk about a camera aimed at still shooters, there are plenty of time lapsers who could make some sweet videos with this new model. Here are the specs on this, which are mostly the same as the previous D810 except for the addition of some photo-specific features, like a special filter that lets H-Alpha Wavelengths through:

  • Optimized for Astrophotography
  • IR-Cut Filter Passes H-Alpha Wavelength
  • 36.3MP FX-Format CMOS Sensor
  • No Optical Low Pass Filter
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processor
  • 3.2" 1,229k-Dot LCD Monitor
  • Full HD 1080p Video at 60/30/24 fps
  • Photo ISO: 200-12800 (High Sensitivity Mode: 32-51200)
  • Video ISO: 64 - 12800, Expandable to 51200
  • 5 fps Shooting
  • Shutter: 1/8000 to 15 minutes (and Bulb)
  • Virtual Live View Exposure Preview
  • 1/8" Headphone, 1/8" Microphone, HDMI C (Mini), USB 3.0
  • Availability: May 2015
  • Price: $3,800

It's not cheap but if this is something you enjoy doing or need for shooting at night, this is the only full-frame DSLR that comes from the factory with these specific features specifically for astrophotography.     

Your Comment

6 Comments

Hey, guess what! It does 25 fps and 50 fps PAL too. Remember that you have international readers too, Nofilmschool. Stop being so americentric.

February 12, 2015 at 3:05AM

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Love Nikon and I'm pretty much about to buy my first DSLR. It is nice to see that Nikon is still investing on video, even though the D810 was already great!

February 12, 2015 at 4:49AM

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Lucas Zanella
Director / DP / Editor
112

This is great. The D750 will probably go down in history as a classic. Some of the best high ISO performance of any DSLR, a beautifully filmic type of noise too rather than the ugly chroma noise and banding common to Canon's sensors (see the tests on DPReview), and 14.5 stops of dynamic range, all on a full-frame sensor with just enough pixels to get a nice pixel pitch (6 micrometers), while still being able to really zoom in. And the fact that it can accurately focus down to -3 EV, the limit of a person's ability to see in the dark is stunning. I was looking to get the 5D Mark III, but got this instead and love it!

February 12, 2015 at 12:46PM

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Alexander Max
Cinematographer
74

Dude you sound like a PR guy for Nikon lol! But I have the D750 too and do have to agree with ya.

February 12, 2015 at 8:45PM

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Darren Weckerle
Editor/Colorist
87

This is a pretty neat kit, though I do not think I would buy it due to the fact I have no glass that fits Nikon well so it would be really hard to justify the buy in price without a wide lens.

I am sure for people wanting an excuse to upgrade from their older Nikon models, this would be a great deal!!!

February 19, 2015 at 10:19AM, Edited February 19, 10:19AM

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Kyle Dockum
Videographer and Editor
1343

Hey Joe,

Man, where was your article 3 weeks ago?! LOL I had a old Nikon D300, and found myself with a strong urge to get into astrophotography. I stumbled on https://www.photographytalk.com/astrophotography-tips-for-beginners and found this article referencing the D850 from Nikon. I couldn’t afford that body so I ended up speaking to another member from my photography club that suggested the D800. I had no idea about the D810A, which based on your article seems more in line with astrophotography. Had I seen that, I would have bought that body instead!

Bummer. Oh well. Thanks for the good read. You got a new follower.

July 30, 2019 at 10:49PM, Edited July 30, 10:49PM

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