February 22, 2016

Disturbing USC Study Reveals Just How Badly Hollywood Fails Women and Minorities

Just days before the Oscars, a new study casts a damning light upon a Hollywood in desperate need of a diverse facelift.

This morning, USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism released another in a series of eye-opening reports about the dismal state of diversity in film and television production. The Comprehensive Annenberg Report on Diversity in Entertainment (CARD) surveys the lack of representation of women and minorities on-screen and behind the camera in fictional films, TV shows, and digital series distributed by 10 major media companies (21st Century Fox, CBS, Comcast NBC Universal, Sony, The Walt Disney Company, Time Warner, Viacom, Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix). 

Films distributed by independent distribution companies were excluded from the sample, which focused on theatrical releases from 2014 by the major studios or their subsidiaries. The 109 sample films, which included Inherent Vice, Birdman, and Edge of Tomorrow, also had to meet certain domestic box office requirements.

The study's summary states that "the film industry still functions as a straight, white boy’s club." This finding shouldn't be surprising to anyone working in the industry, but the numbers are staggering nonetheless. 

“We have an inclusion crisis,” Stacy L. Smith, director of the Annenberg school’s Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative, and the study’s lead author, told NPR.

Key findings

Female Speaking Roles in Film and TV
Credit: USC Annenberg
  • Across the 11,306 speaking characters evaluated, 66.5% were male and 33.5% were female
  • Female characters fill only 28.7% of all speaking roles in film
  • Film was less likely than broadcast or cable to show women 40 years of age or older
  • There was a gender ratio of 5.6 males to every one female behind the camera in popular media
  • There were 2.5 male screenwriters for every one female screenwriter
  • Stories with a female director attached had 5.4% more girls/women on screen than those stories without female direction 
  • Females represent only 39.1% of executives across the media divisions of companies evaluated
Film distributor USC annenberg study
Credit: USC Annenberg
  • At least half or more of all cinematic, television, or streaming stories fail to portray one speaking or named Asian or Asian American on screen
  • 28.3% of all speaking characters were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, which is below (-9.6%) the proportion in the U.S. population 
  • Underrepresented females 40 and over accounted for less than 2% of all speaking characters
  • 87% of the directors were white; 13% were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.
  • Only two of the 53 underrepresented directors in film and television/digital series were Black women
  • All studio conglomerates fail with regard to inclusivity of girls and women (onscreen, no company earns more than a "Barely Inclusive" score)
  • Hulu and Amazon performed strongly (65%) due to their inclusivity of women
  • Percentage of on screen underrepresented characters increases 17.5% when an underrepresented director is at the helm of a scripted episode or film

Agents of change

The study eschews the idea that "checking a box" in terms of diversity will solve the problem. Instead, it advocates for specific and continued actions that film, television, and streaming companies can employ to combat explicit and implicit biases. Some of these include "target inclusion goals" that are made public to ensure accountability; recognizing and countering stereotypical thinking during the hiring process; and building "inclusive consideration lists" for onscreen characters that better represent the population of the United States (50% women and 38% people of color).

Industry insiders know better than anyone that lasting change must come from within. Just last week, Jessica Chastain launched an all-female production company. Ava DuVernay continues to be a voice of reason advocating for representation of women of color; her company, Array!, dedicates itself to the "amplification of indie films by people of color and women."

Below, we've highlighted a few organizations and resources that diverse filmmakers should keep on their radar, or where producers looking to hire diverse crews may be able to make connections:

We salute these and other organizations that have taken an active stance against #HollywoodSoWhite. Here's to a 2016 full of faces we recognize from the real world, both behind and in front of the camera.     

Featured image via George A. Spiva Center for the Arts

Your Comment

61 Comments

You simply have to follow the money. Studios, cable, Tv networks are in it for the money / ROI. And that trickles down into projects, costs, market appeal, ability to sell advertising, demographics...etc It's just the way the world goes around. I can assure you if you can produce a great product, with broad appeal no one will care the particular mix of the above mentioned groups. Now, color does matter...but that particular color is GREEN.

February 22, 2016 at 7:32PM

2
Reply

I posed the following question to our Facebook page (comprised of indie filmmakers).

"If you were handed a 10 million dollar budget, who is the first person you would hire".

The majority responded with "either a family member or a friend". I would respond that way as well.

The majority of Hollywood is run by people of Jewish ancestry. Not "white people". Jewish people are a minority as much as any other minority. In fact, Hollywood is run by one of the most persecuted minorities in history!

Who would you hire if you were handed a budget?

You hire people you trust, people you know, family, and friends. After that, you hire the best person for the job.

It's not racism, it's not sexism, it's human nature and we are ALL guilty of it in some way (if guilt must be found)

It's about who you know.

February 22, 2016 at 8:22PM, Edited February 22, 8:23PM

8
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Agreed. This is nothing but noise making by people who want to simply be "hired in" for jobs they didn't put the time into earning. If a female director wants to sacrifice her 20's and 30's living in near poverty, forgoing weekend trips/travel/vacation, putting every extra dime into her films, pouring 16-hour weekend-days into set-building... then she'll have the same chance as any man of becoming a working director/producer... which is still pretty poor statistically.

If you're not well connected... like say, Sophia Coppola... there's going to be a inherent risk factor... and you don't get to remove the "risk" factor just because your superficial-group identity is under represented statistically. Put in the work. That is all.

February 22, 2016 at 8:55PM

0
Reply

kinda sucks a person has to give up so much to be equal to a person who gives up so little.

February 23, 2016 at 12:35PM

0
Reply
avatar
Howard L Hughes
Content Creator
164

I know Stacy Smith. Took her class at USC. Interesting but always shoving feminist propaganda down her students' throat.

February 22, 2016 at 9:13PM

8
Reply
sidb
99

Or maybe they're not good enough? If you look at top universities there are not as much black people as white...They have equal chance to get to university, but somehow in medical schools there are like 4 times as much white people as black. Let's face the truth - there are less good female film directors, black film directors than white one. It's as simple as that. You say that Academy is full of racists then why Mexican directors will win 3 Academy Award in a row & Lubezki also 3? Women & black people should stop making excuses & just spend more time on improving...It feels to me that it's the easiest way to stop improving & make dumb excuses that "I can't get a job, coz I'm black or woman". I find that many black people & women instead working hard, love to blame society for their position. That's the main reason why we see such few women, black directors. It's not like they're less talented, they just have bad mindset.

February 22, 2016 at 9:34PM

0
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

You're an idiot...

February 23, 2016 at 3:29AM, Edited February 23, 3:29AM

11
Reply
Mike
76

I think all of these statistics are very misleading. These statistics assume that all professions have equal amount of men and women, both employed and unemployed.
For example, i want to hire two scuba diver welder. In my area, there are 100 scuba diver welder, 99 women, 1 man. So because of diversity I have to hire the man. There is nothing wrong with that, right? Okey, I hired 1 man, 1 woman but this isn't complete yet. I need all kind of transsexuals... and what about all of the races? I have to hire hundreds of people to make everybody happy.

Diversity is the most sexist, racist concept of all time.
Hire the best for the job, end of story.

All-female companies aren't sexist?!

February 22, 2016 at 9:34PM

8
Reply
xxx yyy
81

Black people have special awards for ONLY black people. If that's not racism then what is it? If you create company full of women then it's nothing wrong. Try to do it with all men. We are living in a society full of hypocrisies, where equality is forced by law, rules not by heart & education.

February 22, 2016 at 9:47PM

5
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

Hmm, true as well, it reminds me of those movies were the whole cast is black and they are set in modern day north america, kinda creepy if you ask me...

February 23, 2016 at 3:32AM

0
Reply

Black people have special awards for only black people? What are you trying to say? Literally every other award show is predominately with white people winning awards from other white people.

February 23, 2016 at 11:07AM

5
Reply

Thats not true. Black people have awards for people who effect the black community in positive ways. And when it comes to film they recognize black films but the awards are given to people of many nationalities. Marshal Mathers has won awards and he is white. Bill clinton I believe was given an award and he is white. I can name about 6-7 more but cannot remember what they were for at the moment. Justin Timberlake won R&B album of the year by some other black organization.

February 23, 2016 at 12:42PM

14
Reply
avatar
Howard L Hughes
Content Creator
164

I'm also against forced equality in art. It's becoming just stupid - look at SAG awards, so many black people got awarded only because all black people vote for black people, not because they were the best. They even have their own award for only black people (if that's not racism then what is it?). When game Witcher was released some idiots filled a lawsuit against creators, because there wasn't a gay romance option. It's just sick & stupid. You give stats about how many % women speak & men in movies. Maybe in 10 years if the circle of stupidity won't stop we will see forced 50-50%. Forced equality is the ultimate death to art. Equality is a natural process & it shouldn't be influenced by creating stupid rules, laws. I think women, black people are much more respected & treated equally nowadays & we should increase awareness that every race, sex is equal. But we need to do it, not but rules, laws, but education.

February 22, 2016 at 9:42PM

0
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

Women and minorities are treated better, but ridiculously far from equal. Equality also is not a natural process. After centuries of oppressing people based off of skin color, people are still suffering from the repercussions. You can't possibly say that everyone starts off on the same foot because it is simply not true. From socioeconomic factors to geographic factors, there are simply more barriers making it difficult for non-white males to succeed. Don't get me wrong, with diligence anyone SHOULD have the opportunity to succeed, but to say that it is equal, is simply a lie.

February 23, 2016 at 11:22AM, Edited February 23, 11:22AM

1
Reply

Confirmation bias issues aside, I agree that there's a systemic issue in this industry, and of course many additional systemic issues in the country and world at large in all kinds of industries. When these get brought up, there will always be a high number of people (most of which belong to the demographic being privileged) that try to downplay problems with pseudo-arguments and knee-jerk deflective reasoning as well as well-meaning and ultimately meaningless anecdotes (which don't equal data).

For instance:
@Michael Silvey said "You simply have to follow the money... I can assure you if you can produce a great product, with broad appeal no one will care the particular mix of the above mentioned groups."
My response: Guess which demographic is holding the majority of said money being disseminated? Yep.
Now, a very easy and recent case study: Star Wars has massively broad appeal. Yet Rey, the primary main character, was majorly missing from advertising and products in favor of male characters. Again, you don't get much broader in film appeal than Star Wars, and the new film's grossing numbers confirm this. So yes, systemic sexism, while often "benign" or "subtle", is in fact quite prevalent...and largely invisible to the people not being hurt by it. (Kind of like we don't really think about modern-day slave labor that is happening right now, because we aren't looking at it and it isn't hurting us personally. That's how empathy unfortunately works on a passive level.)

@Luke Neumann said:
"You hire people you trust, people you know, family, and friends. "
Yes! That said, the people you trust and know often look a lot like you. I can recall any year I spent at private school and college where at lunch tables, white people would sit together, and people of color would sit together. Sure, it wasn't *formal* segregation...but it was social circles playing out that way. The Asian students would huddle and sit together etc. because the rest of the students didn't feel comfortable getting to know them and integrate them into existing friend circles. (Plenty of exceptions in different friend groups, but the birds eye view of the lunch tables confirm the trend.) Similarly, girls would often sit together and guys would often sit together.

These social circles coalesce as we grow up and become comfortable with existing social ties, and with no major needs to make new groups of friends to maintain a healthy social life.

So while it's true that we generally hire the people we know, trust, and have existing connections with, the results of that given how we come to know the people we trust in the first place implies that white males will hire other white males. Followed by either male people of color, or white females. Lastly, most likely, female people of color.*

*Keep in mind I've only been talking about the U.S. right now--power structures will look different around the world.

Given that generally it's men walking around with the wealth, they'll be making the hiring decisions, and then we have a cycle. How to break it? That's complex, but a big piece is education (without hysteric propoganda).

"It's not racism, it's not sexism, it's human nature..."
I want to counter this statement, Luke. Do you think racism and sexism are outside the realm of human nature? Very recent history, as well as many places around the world today suggest it isn't. Both exist prevalently in the past and present.

I realize I'm aligning with the "unpopular" side of this "debate", but I also feel that with the amount of research out there today that is easily found with a search engine, there is much less excuse for denial. There's problems. They're not insurmountable. Progress can't be made without talking about them though.

February 22, 2016 at 10:50PM, Edited February 22, 10:50PM

2
Reply
avatar
Samuel Neff
DP / Editor
786

I think the social circles coalesce long before we grow up.

I also don't believe racism and sexism are within human nature, no. Let me explain:

The 2016 definitions of racism and sexism are a bit too broad, in my opinion. If you took a white kid that grew up in a white neighborhood and sat him down with an African American kid for the first time, there would be some inappropriate questions and comments. From both kids. That is not racism. That is a kid seeing someone that looks different from them and being curious. Anything more than that would be an early imprint from their parents, society, or the media. Kids don't care.

I truly believe society forms these opinions early on. By the time they get to school and start making friends, these opinions have already been formed but they are not representative of human nature. Not even close.

Believing that would mean kids don't pick up any habits before they get to Kindergarten.

February 22, 2016 at 11:51PM, Edited February 22, 11:51PM

11
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Definitely agree on kids being kids with their ignorant and pure curiosities. And agreed that impressions and habits form early on. (Which makes the cultural / environmental values silently passed on all the more crucial.)
I'm not sure how much we may actually be in disagreement on this aspect. The conversation of human nature is one I actually love to explore and talk about with people, but I realize that may be a rabbit hole here... :)

February 23, 2016 at 5:00AM

12
Reply
avatar
Samuel Neff
DP / Editor
786

Also, per your Star Wars comments.

Disney would not knowingly cripple such a huge demographic. Either it was a mistake or they were trying to do something in another market (and that's a reach).

You believe they would sacrifice huge amounts of money because all of the people that make decisions have something against women? Kathleen Kennedy is heading the whole thing up. If anything it was a cold business decision with no malice involved outside of trying to make the most money.

Come on now, Disney making a stand against women by giving up toy sales? That's as far fetched a conspiracy theory as any.

You know I love ya Sam. I just had to call that one out :)

February 23, 2016 at 12:00AM, Edited February 23, 12:02AM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

"Also, per your Star Wars comments.
Disney would not knowingly cripple such a huge demographic."

Absolutely agreed. The key word is "knowingly". In broad strokes, much of systemic privilege isn't intentional or aggressive. It doesn't realize its own damage, and is often not self-aware.

To take a couple clearer examples:

If countless Americans had truly *known* (in the full philosophical sense of the word) that all humans have equal value by nature of being human, not a skin color, they would not have recently in history (the abolition in 1865 IS very recent) bought, beaten, whipped, raped, etc. so many African-Americans on a daily basis, nor painted them as animals and oppressed them constantly even after slavery was outlawed. It doesn't take much searching online to notice those kinds of mindsets are alive and well still in this country, sadly.

And women only started being allowed to vote in the 1900's. Less than 100 years ago--even more recent. Is this a case of millions of Americans intentionally living out overt anti-woman behavior? Not really. Rather, millions of men in power holding a flawed ideology of what gender entails as a role in life. It isn't a matter of mass hate, but mass ignorance. (which leads to fear...which leads to hate--thanks Yoda.)

So...back to Disney.
"Come on now, Disney making a stand against women by giving up toy sales? That's as far fetched a conspiracy theory as any."

Yeah. I seriously doubt they have any overt case against women...that is preposterous for me to believe too. I didn't have an intention of implying that in my original post. But were their initial marketing decisions where Rey was conspicuously absent from most toy sets still potentially reflective of a problem which has many other examples? I think so.

Love you too, Luke--I don't mind being called out! Don't worry though, I don't have tin foil hats on...that I'm aware of. ;)

From my point of view, these things boil down like this: Unknowingly breaking the law is still breaking the law. Unknowingly living with underlying sexist / racist mentalities doesn't make those mentalities not sexist / racist.

February 23, 2016 at 5:48AM

7
Reply
avatar
Samuel Neff
DP / Editor
786

This world is bigger than you, me and your statistics. Whatever you do in regards to filmmaking than do it. Who cares about these statistics, seriously who really cares?

If your a lone shooter ,than go out and shoot some videos, if you work for a small or large production team than go out and give it your best and do it, because while your doing all this. There will be people so concern with these statistics and wanting to " change" the world. They will waste to much energy doing so.

in another few months and maybe next year. It will be another topic, another agenda, another social or political agenda and it will only bring contentions towards one another.

Filmmaking is about networking. Who do you know that can lend a hand and get you your first gig? is it a film school teacher? a neighbor that knows JJ abrams cousin sister ? Its always been about networking and " luck of the draw" or " the right timing " Society is so horrible now, that all its been doing lately is bring these agendas. Do a simple search and you will see how bad the forums, comments sections get when you start to bring up these agenda driven topics.

So while everybody else argues and believes they will change the world ( cough cough** they won't) Put your focus and energy on buying your gear, writing your script, editing your film or networking with people who can get your foot in the door to your desired position.

if you get a chance, go to YouTube and search " Advice on Filmmaking " by Magnum Independent pictures. Harold Ramis gives the simplest and best advice on filmmaking.

Hint* The person sitting next to you might be the one to give you your next paid gig.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAojYoFnpOI&index=257&list=LL_zN2u2WRAeY...

February 23, 2016 at 12:17AM

0
Reply

There are a lot truths about hiring practices in this article. For instance, does a casting call for a commercial need to specify race for the majority of commercial scripts? I realize the article is focused on narrative works, but I do hear about instances of this sort of non-inclusive casting from friends who are gifted actors and actresses.

I do not think the point of the article or my leading comment is for anyone who is in the majority groups represented in these industries to feel as if they are being called sexist or racist. The bigger point is to be reflective about the decisions and interactions we are presented with when it comes to collaborating with people from all walks of life. You could be in charge of hiring crew or making casting decisions or whatever. Start thinking of it as a way to present people with opportunities to get their break or make their contribution, no matter their appearance.

As a counter point, it would be interesting to see the numbers from this article contrasted with data regarding minority representation in these fields from past decades.

February 23, 2016 at 12:25AM

10
Reply
avatar
Ryan Haggerty
Director of Photography/Colorist
88

Alrighty, let's recap: women are unwilling to put the time and effort into getting the jobs they want, they (along with other minorities like "the blacks") are simply not as skilled in the craft of filmmaking as "the whites", and Hollywood is run by the Jews, which is important to note because the Jews hire family first, then I guess women, and then blacks (and I guess that's ok?)

There are a lot of progressive minds here. I'm impressed.

February 23, 2016 at 3:01AM, Edited February 23, 3:01AM

10
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

Men and women also have different IQ distribution... men have more idiots and more geniuses. And at the genius end, around IQ 140... men outnumber women by nearly 20:1. Not to mention men also have more auditory and visual/spacial connections in the brain and more developed amygdalas (what regulates emotions and stress)... so yea, the scientific and biological evidence points to men just being better suited to these jobs.

February 23, 2016 at 4:56AM

7
Reply

Considering some other comments here, I can't tell if Chet's is sarcasm or not. Which is kind of scary.

February 23, 2016 at 5:52AM

1
Reply
avatar
Samuel Neff
DP / Editor
786

It's only scary if you don't understand evolution, science, or biology. Look it up if you're actually curious. I just don't understand why in 2016 people can't accept the evolutionary differences of a sexual dimorphic species.

It also doesn't mean "there are no females who can do these jobs"... it just means there's much smaller pool.

The amount of women producers/directors in the industry is actually quite fair when you factor in the biological tendencies and projected aptitudes.

February 23, 2016 at 12:31PM, Edited February 23, 12:34PM

3
Reply

Oh yeah he's for real.

February 23, 2016 at 12:49PM

3
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

Yea, I am for real. Because these are real facts that offer real explanations. If you can show me counter data and offer a different theory of evolution, I'll change my mind. I have no ideology... I just look at biology and data for what it is.

February 23, 2016 at 10:23PM

0
Reply

We are living in society full of lies, don't be surprised people can't accept truth. You give them facts they will call you racist, sexist...It's the easiest way to escape the reality...Society is full of hypocrisies, where everyone is equal, but when you say facts about difference in sex, race you will get publicly scolded & every fact will be neglected. I can't believe you're getting down voted...

February 24, 2016 at 5:07AM

7
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

Um, I do not appreciate the way you summed up my comment and lumped it in with some of the others here.

February 23, 2016 at 10:31AM, Edited February 23, 10:36AM

2
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

This was supposed to be a reply to Steven Bailey.

February 23, 2016 at 11:43AM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Luke, which part of the summary do you take issue with? That Hollywood is run by Jews? That it's all about family, and that's who they hire first? That this accounts for the disparity between female, lgbt, and black speaking roles, directing roles, writing roles - every role?

February 23, 2016 at 12:37PM, Edited February 23, 12:37PM

0
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

"Hollywood is run by Jews"

"Hollywood is run by one of the most persecuted minorities in history".

Which part do you think I take issue with, Steven? Nepotism absolutely can account for disparity. Are you joking?

February 23, 2016 at 1:00PM, Edited February 23, 1:03PM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

I'm still confused. I get that you're saying it's about family. That's what I was saying you were saying.

Are you just upset that someone is implying they disagree with you?

February 23, 2016 at 1:38PM

5
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

"Hollywood is run by Jews"

"Hollywood is run by one of the most persecuted minorities in history".

Which part do you think I take issue with, Steven?

February 23, 2016 at 1:44PM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Nobody cares about how nicely you described a people group, Luke.

February 23, 2016 at 1:50PM

0
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

Um.

(raises hand)

I do.

February 23, 2016 at 1:56PM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

The words you use to describe a person or group of people don't matter. Sure.

Join me in 2016, won't you?

February 23, 2016 at 1:57PM

11
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Man, I can't take you seriously. You're being really self-righteous and patronizing right now and it's bumming me out. =\

I feel like "the jews" vs. "people of jewish descent" might be an interesting discussion, but you're distracting from a really weighty and important topic and I think that's unfortunate and irresponsible. If you've actually got a bone to pick look me up and shoot me an e-mail and we can work it out there.

Also, I wasn't suggesting words don't matter in how you describe an individual or group of people. My comment was specific to you, in this instance, in regards to what you said and how it relates to the larger topic.

February 23, 2016 at 3:23PM

0
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

I had issue with one thing and one thing alone. I have now copied and pasted that issue twice. This turning into a "distraction" likely happened here:

"I wasn't suggesting words don't matter in how you describe an individual or group of people."

Followed by:

"Nobody cares about how nicely you described a people group."

February 23, 2016 at 4:50PM

2
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Luke, I think saying "people of Jewish descent run hollywood" is the same as saying "the Jews run hollywood". I think you keep implying that my description, "the jews", is offensive by copy-pasting them together, but it's hard to be sure because repeatedly copy-pasting is a confusing and indirect way to make an argument. Anyway, I don't think it's offensive, and I don't think it's an inaccurate summary of what you said. It's like saying it's offensive to say "the americans".

And my suggestion that nobody cares about your elaborate description vs. my simple one has nothing to do with whether or not I think being respectful or disrespectful is a good or bad thing. I was just saying it doesn't have anything to do with anything we're talking about. It's off topic. (For clarity, I was mostly using the word "nicely" in the same way I'd use the word "flowery". I was not using it as an indicator of respectful vs. disrespectful. Maybe that's where you're getting caught up with that one? [edit] But really, either interpretation works for what I was getting at. Saying "no one cares that you just described someone nicely" doesn't scale to, "no one cares about being nice ever" or "it would have been ok if you had been mean in describing them".)

February 23, 2016 at 6:06PM, Edited February 23, 6:12PM

8
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

I think saying "people of Jewish descent run hollywood" is the same as saying "the Jews run hollywood".

Within the context of this scenario, that's like the difference between:

"African Americans run the NBA" or "The Blacks run the NBA".

There is a difference. Not as pronounced in our discussion...but it is there. It is the difference between trying to have a real discussion about a sensitive issue and just being socially unaware.

Either way, I'm tired of talking about this so I will leave my end of things there.

I like to think I am socially aware and sensitive to most current issues. I am also aware of the fact that the issue we are discussing is sensitive and important to a lot of people.

So I chose my words very carefully. Upsetting or offending people is the difference between having a discussion or turning someone off instantly.

You seem to be fairly logical so I'm sure a lot of this is just miscommunication due to the fact that we are not having this discussion in person.

February 23, 2016 at 8:55PM, Edited February 23, 9:00PM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Definitely agreed with your last sentence. Happy to leave it at this.

February 23, 2016 at 9:46PM

0
Reply
avatar
Steven Bailey
Writer/Director/Composer
1005

After reading through these comments, it's really no wonder the statistics tell the story they do. Sad.

February 23, 2016 at 3:08AM

4
Reply
Kenneth Merrill
Director
1205

Even though I agree with some of those comments, after reading them all, I arrived at the same conclusion as you. To make my mind clear I will write the same thing I wrote in the last comment section for a similar article. There are too many things wrong in Hollywood industry, this is one. I know that this is not „all the things that are wrong with Hollywood” article but I am just saying. This is only one. In my opinion not even the worst one.

February 23, 2016 at 8:11AM

0
Reply

"There are too many things wrong in Hollywood industry, this is one."

Sure... so go crowd fund some diverse films and start making a new "hollywood".

February 23, 2016 at 12:37PM

0
Reply

That is what is happening with todays music. hopefully film will follow. but it is hard to be a C rated anything. sometimes it doesn't pay off but you have to keep pushing.

February 23, 2016 at 1:24PM

0
Reply
avatar
Howard L Hughes
Content Creator
164

Yep. The vehement denials from people falling in the majority demographic, whenever somebody dares to suggest there might be a problem here that is worth addressing, reinforces my belief that there is a problem worth addressing.

February 23, 2016 at 2:43PM

11
Reply
avatar
Philip Heinrich
Director, Producer
991

Kind of a sausage party in here. In fact, it reeks of dicks...

February 23, 2016 at 3:23AM

2
Reply
Mike
76

Does that surprise you, given the content of this article?

February 23, 2016 at 10:34AM, Edited February 23, 10:34AM

0
Reply
avatar
Luke Neumann
Cinematographer/Composer/Editor
2717

Racism and sexism come from a selfish heart. You put your comfort before serving others and you only work with someone from your culture who makes you feel comfortable. This will be a problem as long as we are selfishly motivated beings, and can't be fixed by finger wagging or being intentionally inclusive to make yourself look good, which is just as selfish as exclusiveness and rings very hollow indeed. It can only be fixed by being selfless and willing to be uncomfortable and work with people who don't immediately fit with you. That being said, a film will often be artistically bankrupt if it starts with inclusiveness. Inclusiveness can be part of the casting process and scripts are always flexible--you can change the sex or the race of a character--or perhaps your film is about inclusiveness or about a different group of people than you; but sometimes you as a filmmaker have to make a film about your personal experience, so if you're a white male filmmaker, you will often make films about what that experience is like, same for black, female etc. I don't see this as racist as much as "writing what you know." It's not so much the fault of white filmmakers as it is the fault of studios that so few minority films get produced. I think the key is to support minority films and filmmakers--let's put our money where our mouths are.

February 23, 2016 at 11:28AM

8
Reply
avatar
Sean Anderson
Video Production Team Member at Fotodiox
89

Well said. Embrace the unknown, collaborate, and be open to the thoughts and ideas of others.

February 23, 2016 at 5:32PM

2
Reply
Sean Taylor
Filmmaker / Actor
88

The fact that there are no female commenters on this post should tell you something.

February 23, 2016 at 11:35AM

0
Reply
Richard Krall
richardkrall.com
1508

But there are minorities. You see? Girls don' like to b part ov nothin'

February 23, 2016 at 11:48AM

0
Reply

I think it says a lot. any business has to make the effort to stand with its viewers. If no effort is made then you will be left with a natural audience. Just like I may be the only person of color responding not because i'm the only person of color on this board but i'm the only one that may want to respond. Stick a white guy at a black lives matter rally and see what he says. probably nothing. its not his place. maybe minorities and women feel this isn't there place to speak there opinion. Look at the majority of the interviews and blogs on film are mostly white males. So you will end up with a majority of white males as your base. not saying there aren't interviews and blogs of minorities and women but the only people that know about this are Minorities and women.

February 23, 2016 at 12:59PM

0
Reply
avatar
Howard L Hughes
Content Creator
164

I should have known the comments section for this post was going to be a train wreck.

I better just chalk it up to "that's the Internet" and leave now lol.

February 23, 2016 at 10:18PM

12
Reply

I know it's now in vogue to lump all males together to highlight male - female disparities, but male minorities aren't anywhere close to having equal footing with their White male counterparts.

February 23, 2016 at 11:16PM, Edited February 23, 11:25PM

4
Reply

I can imagine that (main) characters of films are more likely to be a man, since most screenwriters and directors are men and can identify better with men in general.

But everyone knows - and it's not new - that jobs all over the world are still unevenly distributed, it's unfair but true. So why wouldn't this count for the film industry, an enormous industry with lots of money involved? It's good that it has been researched and also good certain production companies do want to change. People should stop worrying about gender/skintone so much and start worrying about quality of the production and the (end)result of fine teamwork.

February 24, 2016 at 2:50AM

0
Reply
avatar
Michiel Eskens
Director & Editor
211

Yeah, so many women writing here, so many black men too. Just accept the fact that there are much less women, black people interested in & good at filmmaking. How many good movies did you see made by women, black directors? Just how many? If someone is good, race, sex don't matter. The problem is there are just a few good women & black directors. I also think there should be equality, but in reality there are just much more good white men directors than women & black. I personally don't want to see black, women only getting jobs only, because of their sex, race & I'm worried if there will be more such stupid opinions as your, more talented white people won't get work...Talent, skill should be the only thing important in getting a job. Right now women, black are just not as much skilled & they're just not as interested in filmmaking.

February 24, 2016 at 5:18AM

0
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

I personally don't know ANY women or black director, who was/is a true genius & could be compared to the best. There are plenty movies made by women & black, but they're just not as good as made by Spielberg, Innaritu, Kurosawa, Kubrick, Bergman, or even Tarantino. The problem is clearly in quality.

February 24, 2016 at 5:21AM

0
Reply
Andy Tokarski
Director, Editor, Colorist
1178

I think you're overseeing the real problem here; perhaps you have never seen a good film by women and coloured people, because they didn't get the same chances as the average white filmmaking man. That's where the problems start and that's what the article is referring to. In filmschool I've had some female colleagues who made outstanding work, but all the jobs are taken by men. So it's also an issue of getting the right chance, getting someone to trust you and provides you of money to start a pilot/film. In the end it's about quality; if you can hire a female for an job on your filmset - with the same qualities as a white man - why shouldn't you hire her? Because she's a woman?

February 26, 2016 at 1:49AM

4
Reply
avatar
Michiel Eskens
Director & Editor
211

A very good article from a friend of mine who is on the inside of this issue.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/24/11101220/black-list-franklin-leonard-i...

February 24, 2016 at 4:12PM

6
Reply
Tenolian
239