May 2, 2019

How to Light A Scene in 'Minority Report' Like Spielberg

Steven Spielberg is one of the greatest directors of all time, but you can light a scene like him. We promise. 

Minority Report is a masterpiece that I don't think got enough recognition when it hit theaters. The film is gripping and exciting, pulling us along while Tm Cruise tries to solve a mystery where he's the only suspect. While the story is incredible, intricate, and exciting, the cinematography stands out among the best in Spielberg's filmography. 

In fact, when they were planning the shoot, Spielberg told his longtime cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski, that he wanted Minority Report to be the “ugliest, dirtiest movie” he had ever made. 

One shot that everyone talks about in the movie is the long take through the hallway and into the elevator. Here's the original long take

How can I recreate Spielberg lighting? 

Rubidium Wu of Intellytech Lighting asked this question and then became determined to answer it. So, he put together this helpful tutorial documenting all the tips and tricks Spielberg uses in this scene. Check it out below:

Learning to light and film this long, tricky shot like Steven Spielberg's Minority Report was a daunting task. Wu, as well as filmmakers Tom Antos and Armando Ferreira focus on camera movement and lighting. They shot in raw light, in 4K, with a Readirig, and using Intellytech Light Cannon Pro as well as LiteCloth LC-160 and LiteCloth LC-120. They also use the DJI Ronin 2 and Canon C200. 

Plus, they had the ability to work on a sound stage and a lot of time for trial and error. 

You can check out Antos' and Ferreira's videos on how they tackled this difficult shot below:

What's next? Learn basic angles, movement, and camera tools

Have you ever been overwhelmed at the possibility of every camera angle, framing, and shot type available as a filmmaker? Us too. So we provided a cheat sheet with definitions for you! There are so many camera movements and camera angles; it can be hard to keep track. To make film and television like the masters, you need to practice and learn the various camera movements, angles, shots, and tools. But how can you know if you’re hitting all the basics without a comprehensive checklist? We put our heads together and came up with this list that should help any filmmaker master the basics and take on the industry.

Click the link to learn more!      

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