July 4, 2013

Metabones NEX & MFT Speed Boosters for Nikon Lenses Now Shipping

If you've been living under a rock for the past few months, you may not have heard all the buzz about this amazing adapter called the Speed Booster that can actually make lenses faster, sharper, and wider. How does it does this exactly? Focal reducers, as they are called, have been around forever, but as long as you've got a big enough piece of glass, it basically works like moving a projector closer to a screen. Things get smaller, but they also get sharper. The Canon Speed Booster for NEX has been available for some time, but if you are more comfortable with a native mount attaching to your NEX E-Mount, or you'd like a Micro 4/3 mount version, and you needed to be able to control Nikon G series lenses (the ones without a manual aperture ring), Metabones now has a solution for you with the new Nikon Speed Booster.

 

While other adapters exist, the Speed Booster is made to a very high standard. Here's a review of the previous Canon Speed Booster from Bryant Naro, which allows you to control your lenses with the camera (the Nikon Speed Booster does not do this):

Metabones had a slight delay with the Micro 4/3 version of the adapter, but now it seems they've overcome any issues, as the new Nikon adapter is shipping in addition to the already-shipping Leica R and Contax versions. We still don't know when we might see a Canon version of the Micro 4/3 Speed Booster, but the Nikon version is shipping just in time for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and the BMCC MFT (which is already in stock in many places).

Both the NEX and MFT Speed Boosters will run you $430, so it's a bit of a discount from the Canon version since you're only getting manual control in the adapter. You can find out more information and order one of your own over on the Metabones product page.

Link: Metabones Speed Booster

[via Conurus Twitter]

Your Comment

20 Comments

So given that this Nikon version doesn't do electronic aperture control, does that mean that it is essentially a dumb adapter? In other words, is it mechanical only and therefore not supporting stabilization/VR on Nikon lenses which have this?

July 4, 2013 at 10:49PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

8
Reply

I looks that way: no VR and no autofocus.

It will be interesting to see when they release a Canon to MFT adapter if it supports electronic controls. I think it will considering their EF to NEX speedbooster already does (although with varying degrees of support for various lenses).

July 5, 2013 at 1:58AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Steve

Finally! I've been waiting for the Nikon m43 version ever since they announced the Speedbooster. So excited!

July 4, 2013 at 11:26PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
angusmokphoto

C'mon... hurry up with that EF-to-MFT one already. :-P
It's the one I've been waiting for ever since they announced the product. I'm already a bit disappointed that it's not going to support EF-S mount lenses...

July 5, 2013 at 12:16AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

1
Reply
Blah

Why wouldn't it? The mount on EF and EF-S is the same so what's to stop someone from putting an EF-S on there? Is it just a matter of the electronics working?

July 5, 2013 at 3:05AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Angus

Actual Canon EF-S lenses have a slightly different set of contacts than EF lenses and can damage a full frame body or adapter if you try to mount them on it. Third party EF mount lenses for crop sensor cameras don't have this issue. They are actually just an EF mount with an image circle designed for an APS-C sensor. So when the EF to MFT speed booster comes out, the only Canon mount crop sensor lenses it will be compatible with will most likely be non-Canon lenses. Slightly ironic if you ask me.

July 5, 2013 at 4:45AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

Yeah, like Jay mentioned, the official Canon EF-S lenses are ever so slightly different than the regular EF ones. Canon APS-C cameras with EF-S mounts allow for EF-S lens elements to be closer to the sensor than regular EF glass, so most of the official Canon EF-S lenses take advantage of that extra range; if EF-S lenses were somehow mounted on to regular Canon EF cameras, they'd run the risk of scratching the mirror or sensor. Cameras like the EF-mount BMCC are fine since the company has stated compatibility with EF-S lenses, but you should always make sure.
It sucks to lose out on some great and flexible high-quality image-stabilized Canon EF-S glass like the 17-55 f/2.8 or 15-85 f/3.5-5.6, which would both be amazingly useful on the Speed Booster. Most of the image stabilized and wider-angled Canon glass is mounted for EF-S, so if you want any lenses wider than 24 mm (equivalent to 34 mm an EF-to-MFT Speed Booster), you'll have to go to third party lenses.

July 5, 2013 at 8:16PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Blah

Im confused about the "G" part. Am I going to be able to use a TOKINA 11-16 on my Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera?

July 5, 2013 at 12:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

7
Reply
ZIM

Nikon G lenses don't have aperture rings. Thus the aperture has to be controlled via the camera's electronics.

This is basically giving G lenses an aperture ring, plus the extra stop, wider focal range, and MFT conversion.

Yeah, your tokina should be fine as the speedbooster works with (virtually) all F mount lenses.

July 5, 2013 at 1:44AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

1
Reply
Steve

Metabones is being rather offensively greedy; here's where the price point should be, for a directly equivalent product: http://www.ebay.com/itm/400488753177?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

July 5, 2013 at 12:48AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

Have you got your hands on full res image from that adapter? This is optics we are talking about. Look up the guys that actually designed the real speed booster and compare images, then reevaluate that statement. You will almost certainly change your mind.

July 5, 2013 at 1:52AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

4
Reply

Yes, I have seen some of the optics of the cheap focal reducers...awful. You get what you pay for.

July 5, 2013 at 2:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Patrick M

Well, some of us at least want good optics in a speedbooster. Compare a speedbooster to a teleconverter, which also is electronics, pieces of metal and precision optics - they usually cost around $500 too.

Cheap out on the optics, and the end result won't be that satisfactory...

July 5, 2013 at 9:07AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply

'directly equivalent product', lol

July 5, 2013 at 10:51AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

1
Reply
hansd

While you're laughing based upon mere assumptions, I note that the Fotodiox competition performs poorly (http://personal-view.com/talks/discussion/7356/vizelex-light-cannon-lens...), whereas the Roxsen is basically equivalent in optical quality (especially for video, where anal pixel peepers aren't very useful). Don't be a sucker, folks -- just because something costs more, doesn't mean it's better.

July 5, 2013 at 2:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Paul

I'd like to see a direct comparison between the two adapters before I call them equal. I have seen the footage with the metabones speed booster and it is wonderful. Haven't seen anything comparable in the other adapters. Perhaps you can buy the cheaper one and make a video for us to compare?

July 6, 2013 at 6:07PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Patrick M

Does anyone know if the electronic versions of speed boosters enable IS lenses to work ? I'm looking at/waiting for the EF to Micro 4/3, but if IS wont work, i dont think i will consider it cause i'm really looking for IS glass to use with the Black Magic Pocket Cam...

July 5, 2013 at 9:30AM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

2
Reply

This particular version notwithstanding, yes, the Speed Boosters that support electronic lens controls also support image stabilization. For instance, the most well-known version of the Speed Booster, the EF-to-E-mount version, supports IS on Canon EF lenses.

July 5, 2013 at 8:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

10
Reply
Blah

God knows Vimeo will soon be flooded with BMPC hipsters shooting impossibly shaky footage because "art is in the moment, man!" Gyroscopic stabilizers with silent brushless motors at the same $1k price point as the BMPC will be the great salvation of that interim trainwreck.

July 5, 2013 at 11:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:21AM

0
Reply
Paul

Hi, I don't know what they mean by "It does NOT support electronic aperture control." Does this mean if I have a electronic aperture lens (a lens with no manual aperture control) it will not function on the adapter? Meaning I have to find manual aperture Nikon G mounts if I wish to use the speed booster.

December 13, 2013 at 3:47AM, Edited September 4, 11:45AM

2
Reply