March 24, 2014

What Does Shattering Glass Look Like at 10 Million Frames Per Second?

10,000,000 FPSEveryone knows that slow-motion makes everything cooler. It might as well be a scientific fact. However, there are cameras out there that can exceed the speed of many of our fastest cinema-style slo-mo cameras like the Phantom Flex 4K and the FT-ONE. One such camera is the HyperVision HPV-X from Japanese manufacturer Shimadzu, which can record at an insane speed of up to 10,000,000 frames per second. Of course, these super high-speed cameras are made specifically for scientific use and are typically very low in resolution, but that doesn't mean that they can't produce some absolutely breathtaking images.

Here's a quick example of what 10 million fps looks like in the form of a ball shattering a sheet of glass. Also, before you watch, put on a piece of epic music to play over the video. It makes it quite a bit more exciting. (Here's a suggestion.)

I'm not exactly sure what the playback speed is for this clip, but the considering that the HyperVision HPV-X can only record at 10 million fps in 256 frame bursts, that would mean that the actual time in the clip is in the neighborhood of 0.0000256 seconds, which is pretty mind-blowing.

Does technology of this nature have any place in cinema? Probably not, especially considering that the camera is only capable of recording at a resolution of 400 x 250. However, despite the fact that cameras like the HyperVision are made specifically for capturing scientific reactions, they still provide us with an absolute visual treat, one that's entirely unique and dare I say, slightly educational in regards to the physics of shattering glass.

Let's hear your thoughts about this video down in the comments!

Link: HyperVision HPV-X -- Shimadzu 

[via PetaPixel]

Your Comment

13 Comments

Interesting. That's all I can say. Also nice song suggestion :D

March 24, 2014 at 6:04PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dominik Belancic

Don't you mean 10 thousand not million?

March 24, 2014 at 6:18PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jon

Nope, I definitely mean 10 million.

March 24, 2014 at 6:33PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4510

10 million fps is actually not as cool as I would have thought. I think the sweet spot is between 120-1000 fps.

March 24, 2014 at 7:14PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jesper

Yeah, there is definitely a point of diminishing returns when it comes to high-speed photography and how many fps you can pack into a camera. I still think this is pretty damn cool, especially with the music.

March 24, 2014 at 7:55PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Rob Hardy
Founder of Filmmaker Freedom
4510

I thought it was going to be a still picture, haha

March 24, 2014 at 7:31PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I wish they shot it at infinity so I could see the whole shatter.

March 24, 2014 at 8:46PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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I was thinking the same thing but then the lighting requirements for that sort of frame rate probably demand a large aperture.

March 26, 2014 at 12:19AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Dan Findlay

looks better in real time.

March 24, 2014 at 9:41PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Jester

I wish they would've shot the jack of diamonds instead.

March 24, 2014 at 10:05PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Anthony Marino

Beautiful!

March 24, 2014 at 11:28PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Gene

Rapatronic camera is much better !!!
:)

March 25, 2014 at 2:22PM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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Manji06

I remember a demo from a sensor maker a few years ago. They had an 8K * 8K camera that did 1,000,000 fps at 100 frame bursts, again for scientific/military use only.

The sphere in this video is surely fired at 1000m/s at the glass. And it looks like it wouldn't even move... The well known matrix effect shots would have been a lifetime move this way.

Mindblowing. I wonder how much light they fired during that very short moment. A nuclear bomb lightning?

Axel

March 28, 2014 at 7:11AM, Edited September 4, 11:56AM

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