December 14, 2017

Apple Delivers the Final Cut Update We've Been Waiting For

As the iMac Pro pushes VR, Final Cut is anointed the "premiere" tool for VR filmmakers.

Today marks the long-awaited release of Apple's most powerful hardware yet in the new iMac Pro. And with it, the computer behemoth has peppered in a little surprise: a new update for all you Final Cut X users out there.

Final Cut Pro 10.4's major update reflects one of the new iMac's newest capabilities. The iMac Pro is the first Mac to fully support VR, and so it would only make sense that Apple attempts to make Final Cut the "premiere" tool for VR filmmakers. The company claims you can edit 360-degree footage at 8K "and beyond," complete with motion graphics. And for those motion graphics, Apple has updated its companion app Motion to allow the insertion of text and graphics into the video.

One really cool feature that now makes the editing tool standout from the pack, VR-wise, is the ability to preview your work in real-time on VR-compatible headsets.

There are also updates in store for those of you who couldn't care less about VR. Filmmakers can now finally edit in two of today's most important HDR formats: Rec. 2020 HDR10 and Rec. 2020 Hybrid Log Gamma. Graders will also be happy to learn that, in addition to a whole new slate of advanced color inspection tools, the update also provides both HDR-compatible scopes. This comes with the nifty option to boot up HDR monitoring on external displays through your I/O device. 

Lastly, 10.4 gives users the option to edit HEVC and Cinema RAW Light video, create slow-motion footage, and edit audio using Logic Pro plugins. For first-timers, you can now easily import iMovie or iOS projects into your timeline.      

Your Comment

14 Comments

what's final cut pro ?

December 14, 2017 at 2:57PM, Edited December 14, 2:57PM

0
Reply
avatar
stephen knifton
owner / creative director
320

Last I checked it had a 7 at the end.

December 14, 2017 at 3:38PM

0
Reply

Final Cut X is actually pretty great. I work in both Premiere and FCPX and I prefer X for almost anything. Much, much faster.

December 14, 2017 at 4:37PM, Edited December 14, 4:37PM

0
Reply
Daniel King
Videographer, Editor
296

I can see where you are coming from, but I can never justify the price of Apple's hardware and can't understand why they are always pushing sub par GPU's in their systems. FCPX may run extremely well on that platform but every other piece of software suffers due to their lack of higher spec'd hardware.

December 14, 2017 at 5:40PM

0
Reply
avatar
Kyle Acker
Cinematographer/ Video Editor
463

Depends on what machine you're looking at. Their 5K iMacs are actually very well priced considering what you're getting. Building a comparable PC with a comparable display would be tricky.

December 14, 2017 at 7:56PM

0
Reply
Daniel King
Videographer, Editor
296

As someone who owns 2 macbook pros, a mac pro, built 5 dual boot windows/hackintosh machines. I'd argue you can build a comparable pc for much less, as long as you are building it with your dedicated workload in mind.

December 14, 2017 at 10:48PM

0
Reply

including a decent 5k screen in your PC build and the price isn't that far off from the imac.....

December 17, 2017 at 1:40AM

0
Reply

@Kyle Acker

Do you a lot of post effects?

There is certainly a level that an editing program needs for a GPU... But for the most part it is the bandwidth of the busses, storage media and the CPU that is going to slow you down before the video card is going to make an impact.

Which even the base model as some pretty impressive CPU and memory geared to maximizing the computer’s bandwidth.

Pretty sure on Newegg the only processor from intel that is sub 1k only has 8mb cache.

Sure the Vega 56 is no Titan XP... but if you need more GPU than that you would probably be better off doing a rendering farm than using a all in one computer.

December 14, 2017 at 11:27PM, Edited December 14, 11:29PM

0
Reply
Kyle Dockum
Videographer and Editor
599

I understand the hardware argument, but I have a Macbook and a Xeon Hackintosh. Guess which one I like using more? At some point the extra raw power gives way to practical things like portability, display quality, big arse trackpads and the like.

December 15, 2017 at 2:00PM

1
Reply
avatar
Noah Leon
Videographer editor
218

None of this is the case in their new machines. Especially the new imac pro. PC Gamer tried to build a similar maching spec for spec and the iMac was equal in price and with some upgrades cheaper. Not to mention the new GPU's are brand new from AMD

December 15, 2017 at 2:24PM

0
Reply
avatar
Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
916

Agreed. Glad I'm not the only one. The way the timeline works can be a shock at first but once you really go for it it shaves hours off the process. And the exports are SO freaking fast.

December 14, 2017 at 5:47PM

43
Reply
Marcelo Teson
Filmmaking Instructor/Sound Editor
232

FCPX has become a delight to use. I think that Apple received some necessary chastisement at the beginning. Back then, I couldn't stop tinkering with it, even when I was full-time on Premiere. Now that I'm full-time on FCPX, I don't ever get the urge to tinker with Premiere or do any work back in the Adobe ecosystem. Nothing wrong with it, but FCPX is just so dang nice. That counts for points when you spend ten hours a day using something.

December 15, 2017 at 1:58PM

4
Reply
avatar
Noah Leon
Videographer editor
218

Such an underrated piece of software. Kind of odd the vitriol that still comes from editing professionals who haven't really used FCPx.

December 15, 2017 at 2:32PM, Edited December 15, 2:39PM

0
Reply
avatar
Charles C.
Editor/ Director/ Director of Photography/ Wannabe Thinker
916

Also included: much improved color wheels, color curves and HSL curves. Some very advanced tools for subtle grading and secondary CC.

December 16, 2017 at 8:31PM

0
Reply